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July 06, 1963 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1963-07-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAIIA

SATUIRDAY. A

~IcKinley Wins Wimbledon

Title, 9-7, 6-1, 6-4

CLASSIFIEDS

G

WIMBMLEDON, England (A) --
Charles (Chuck) McKinley, a
compact tennis missile, brought
the Wimbledon men's singles
crown back to the United States
after an eight-year absence Fri-
day with a 9-7, 6-1, 6-4 victory in
the finals over Fred Stolle, a tall,
blond bank clerk from Sydney,
Australia.
McKinley, a St. Louis boy who
calls Texas his home now, also
broke a three-year Australian
stranglehold on the title, the most
glittering prize in amateur tennis.
Endurance
And before he swept to victory
he had to endure 35 minutes of
battering from the power-stroking
Stolle that would have wilted a
lesser tennis player. .
Tony Trabert, the Cincinnati
sailor, was the last American-born
star to capture the title, although
Peruvian. Alex Olmedo - who
played for the U. S. in the Davis
Cup - won it in 1959.,
Trabert, now the chief spokes-
man for the touring pro tennis
players, promptly offered McKin-
ley $50,000 for the first year to
turn pro - and McKinley just as
promptly turned it down. He said
he wanted to finish his mathe-
matics course at Trinity Univer-
sity, San Antonio, Tex.
Davis Cup Next
McKinley returns to school in
September and will not finish un-
til January. His next assignment
is with the U. S. Davis Cup team.
The 6-foot-3 Stolle had seven
inches on his American rival, and
for the first 14 games of the
match he reeled off a succession
of hammer blows.
The Australian had the more
powerful serve and he poured it
in, rushed the net behind it and
hit volleys with authority. It
seemed only a matter of time be-
fore McKinley crumbled under
the strain.
But Chuck, 155 pounds of

bounce and acrobatic agility, held
on, retrieving impossible shots and
salvaging his service games after
falling behind again and again.
Then, so suddenly that it took
the 18,000 crowd by surprise, it
was Stolle who cracked.
Double Fault
At 7-7 and 40-15 on his serve,
Stolle double faulted - as he was
to do six times in the match.
Then McKinley lofted a lob just
inches inside the corner that
caught Stolle charging in. He
scuttled back and fluffed it, for
duece.
McKinley hit Stolle's serve right
back at him for one point and
the Australian double-faulted for
the game.
In the tradition of great play-
ers, the 22-year-old McKinley
pounced.
He poured over four straight
serves that Stolle never had a
chance to return, to take the set.
The second set was a proces-
sion. McKinley broke the tall Aus-
tralian, now looking tired and
dispirited, in the first game, and
won the next three as well. The
whole set took only 20 minutes,
only a little more than half the
length of the first.
Last Gasp
Stolle pulled his game together
in the third set.
He got to deuce twice on Mc-
Kinley's serve in the third game,
but the American pulled, it out.
Stolle turned on the power again
in the fifth and got to advantage
despite some great retrieving by
McKinley. Chuck turned on some
great serves to save that game.
Games went with serve to 5-4,
and then McKinley charged right
in for the kill. He poured one re-
turn back that Stolle couldn't
handle, had two kills at the net-
one after throwing himself half-
way across the court - and then
poured across another service re-

turn that Stolle backhanded into
the net.
McKinley threw his racket into
the air and leaped the net.
Princess Marina, mother of the
Duke of Kent and president of
the Lawn Tennis Association, pre-
sented McKinley with the cham-
pionship cup while the gallery
stood and applauded what the ex-
perts called the best final in four
years.
McKinley, seeded fourth, never
lost a set in the tournament.
Stolle, 24, was unseeded and had
never before even reached the
Semifinals. He was the second
Australian in a row to reach the
final from the unseeded ranks.
It was the seventh time the two
had played each other, and Mc-
Kinley's first victory on grass. He
had beaten Stolle twice on other
surfaces and lost four matches.
McKinley said a large part of
his success secret was the fact he
had learned to relax. He said he
was so tense before the 1961 final
against Laver that he had a stiff
arm, and the same thing hap-
pened last year, when Mike Hann
of Britain put him out in an early
round.
Something Extra
"Chuck pulled out something
extra today," Stolle said.
"He was even faster around the
court than usual, if that is pos-
sible, and he varied his service
more. He used one that kicked to
my backhand and I couldn't do
anything with it."
Stolle added, "I was serving
well, but by the end of the match
he was just sending everything
back down my throat."
McKinley said of the pro offer
that he plans to go into business
in Texas, which he now considers
his home.
He said, however, it would be
foolish to say that he definitely
will turn down the pro offer.

-Associated Press
A WINNER'S SMILE-Chuck McKinley of St. Louis, Mo., holds
his trophy high after winning the men's singles tennis title at
Wimbledon, England, yesterday. The Trinity University, San An-
tonio, Texas, student beat Fred Stolle of Australia 9-7, 6-1, 6-4 to
become the first U.S. player to take the title since 1955.
STILL CRITICAL:
Chance of Paralysis
~High'for Vaulter

U. S.'s Year at
Wimbledon
WIMBLEDON, England (') -_
Billie Jean Moffit, a 5-foot-6
chatterbox in horned rim glasses,
gets a chance to make it an
American Wimbledon sweep to-
day, when she battles top-seeded
Margaret Smith of Australia, who
stands four inches taller.
It is the first time in history
that both finals were American-
Australian affairs, since Miss
Smith is the first Australian lass
ever to make the last match.
Uncle Sam also has a shot at
a share of the women's doubles.
and mixed doubles titles. Darlene
Hard, who comes from Long
Beach, Calif., as does Miss Mof-
fitt, is teamed with Maria Bueno
of Brazil in the finals today
against the top seeded pair of
Miss Smith and Robyn Ebbern of
Australia.
The Bueno-Hard combination
won in 1960.
Miss Moffitt won the last two
years teamed with Karen Hantz
Susman of San Antonio, Tex., who
was the singles winner in 1962.
Mrs. Susman, expecting a baby,
did not defend her crown.
It was only the second time
since 1950 that an Australian
team did not make the doubles
final.
In mixed doubles, Miss Hard
and Bob Jewitt of Australia meet
Australian Ken Fletcher and Miss
Smith in the final.
The Hard-Hewitt team elimin-
ated the defenders, Stolle and
Lesley Turner of Australia 5-7,
6-2, 6-2.
Fletcher and Miss Smith beat
Dennis Ralston, of Bakersfield,
Calif., and Mrs. Ann Haydon
Jones of Britain 6-1, 7-5, in yes-
terday's other semifinal.
VISEL HURT:
Unlimiteds
Crack Up
DETROIT (W - The second
accident in preliminaries of the
Gold Cup Race yesterday knocked
veteran racer Morlan Visel and
his hydroplane Miss Madison out
of contention.
Visel, 46, of Lake Tahoe, Nev.,
suffered head cuts, a, broken leg
and a possible shoulder injury
when the left side of the unlinit-
ed class Miss Madison was torn
off in a qualifying run turn in the
Detroit River.
It was the second accident in
Gold Cup trials this week. Danny
Foster escaped uninjured when
Gale VII threw a propeller and
sank.

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all sizes, styles, and prices. Cal 663-
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Cis
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rental-cut rate-2 garages. Call NO
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reasonable. Phone NO2-2625. C
NEW 2 BDRM. APTS. for fall-Furn'd.,
carpeted, balconies. For 3 or 4. Call
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night. C19
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All utilities. $100/mo. NO 2-0879. 012
GIRL TO SHARE campus-two bed-
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Call NO 2-9188. C2
BETWEEN hospitals and Rackham, ef-
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bath. Summer and fall. $75. NO 2-
0070. ,C7
SUMMER-Furnished apartment $50
Mo. Close to I-M Bldg. One room and
kitchen, private bath. Call NO 2-7274.
013
SUMMER ONLY
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bedrooms, jalousied porch. $110/mo.
(another for $70/mo.) NO 3-7268.
Cl
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2260 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod-
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and many other fine features. Low per
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Call NO $-0800 or stop by our rental
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C4
FOXCROFT
APARTMENTS
South State near Hill. Designed and
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occupants. 2 bedrooms each.
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Call Kelly Newton, 3-2260, eves. 2-0110
C13
CAMPUS APTS.
REDUCED
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available for fall. Single student only.
NO 5-9405.
USED CARS
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1960 FIAT Sports Convertible. Excel-
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MUSICAL MDSE.,
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Free pick-up and deliversy service.
CAMPUS RADIO & TV, NO 5-6644,
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A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
Xl

Drive Yourself ...
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS

SEATTLE (P)--Doctors attend-
ing world champion pole vaulter
Brian Sternberg said yesterday
the probability of permanent pa-
ralysis is very high."

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISINb
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DA
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.4C 4.2(
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 overage words tc a lir
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. da
Phone NO 2-4786
TRANSPORTATION

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Washington, Detroit Take Fourth Wins in Cellar Revolt.

CLEVELAND (P) -- V e t e r a n
ght-hander Dick Donovan fired
six-hitter and chipped in with
ro key hits as the Cleveland In-
ans beat the American League-
ading New York Yankees, 4-1
st night.
Hector Lopez' homer in the
venth inning ruined Donovan's
iutout bid.

all-star hurler Jim Bouton. Bou-
ton, who was relieved by Marshall
Bridges after six innings, suf-
fered his fourth loss. He has won
10.
The Tribe scored a run in the
third inning on a walk. Donovan's
double and Tito Francona's sac-
rifice fly. Cleveland added a pair
of runs in the fifth. Al Luplow
beat out a slow roller, Donovan

movan, in1
>ry against

gaining his sixth
five losses, bested

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.

GIB

New York 48 30 .615
Chicago 46 37 .554 4p,
x-Minnesota 44 36 .550 5
Boston 43 35 .544 59,
x-Baltimore 45 39 .536 6
Cleveland 43 38 .532 0
Los Angeles 41 43 .488 10
Kansas City 35 44 .443 139,
Detroit 33 46 .418159,
Washington 27 56 .325 233,
x--Playing night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 4, New York '
Washington 5, Los Angeles 1
Baltimore 4, Minnesota 3 (2nd inc)
Boston, 8, Chicago 3
Detroit 4, Kansas City 3
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Detroit
New York at Cleveland
Los Angeles at Washington
Minnesota at Baltimore
Chicago at Boston

.B
2

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
x-Los Angeles 48 29 .595
x-St. Louis 45 35 .563
Chicago 45 35 .563
x-San Francisco 45 36 .556
x-Cincinnati 44 37 .543
x-Milwaukee 40 39 .506
Pittsburgh 38 42 .481
Philadelphia 38 44 .463:
x-Houston 32 51 .386
New York 29 53 .354
x-Playing night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati at Los Angeles (Inc)
St. Louis at San Francisco (inc)
Milwaukee at Houston (Inc)
Chicago 3, Philadelphia 2
New York 3, Pittsburgh 1
TODAV'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at New York (n)
Philadelphia at Chicago
Milwaukee at Houston (2, t-n)
Cincinnati at Los Angeles
St. Louis at San Francisco

GB
2f
2/
3
4
7
9
10f
17
1912

singled and Luplow romped home
on Mike de la Eoz' double. Dono-
van scored when Clete Boyer
fumbled Willie Kirkland's ground-
er to third.
* * *
Bad Week
DETROIT (R) - Detroit added
to the woes of mistake-plagued
John Wyatt last night, pushing
around the deciding run when he
made two wild throws in the
Tigers' 4-3 victory over the Kan-
sas City Athletics.
Wyatt, who balked and walked
across winning runs in a double-
header defeat by Washington
Thursday, let the Tigers break a
3-3 tie in the seventh on an un-
earned run produced without a
hit.
The ace A's reliever walked Bill
Freehan and let himn advance to
second when he threw wide to
second on a bunt attempt. Free-
han went to third on a sacrifice
and scored when Wyatt threw
high and wide to the plate on
Dick McAuliffe s tapper.
The throw home appeared' to
have Freehan beaten, but Wyatt
was not charged with an error.
* * *

fcr four runs before a man was
out in the first inning and held
on to defeat the faltering; Minne-
sota Twins 4-3 last night in the
first game of a twi-night double-
header.
The Twins scored two runs off
Oriole reliever Dick Hall before
a man was retired in the ninth on
doubles by Earl Battey and Zorro
Versalles and a single by John
Coryl.
With the score 4-3, reliever Stu
Miller came on and retired the
side by striking out pinch hitter
Harmon Killebrew and getting
two me non force p'ays.
Senators Fourth
WASHINGTON OP)-Don Zim-
mer stroked a tie-breaking single
in a three-run seventh inning up-
rising as the Washington Sena-
tors won their fourth straight,
whipping the Los Angeles Angels
5-1.
The loss was the fifth straight
for the Angels.
Don Rudolph won his first
game since May 8 and his fourth
in the last two seasons over the
Angels. He pitched a seven-hitter,
giving up a run in the seventh on
Lee Thomas' single, a sacrifice,
and Albie Pearson's single.

Sternberg was injured Tuesday
night when he fell 14 feet while
performing a difficult double som-
mersault and twist during gym-
nastic practice on a trampoline.
He used gymnastics as an aid to
the pole vaulting technique which
saw him twice break the world
record and establish a new stand-
ard of 16 feet, 8 inches, now up
for recognition as a world mark.'
The latest medical bulletin on
Sternberg issued by Dr. William
Robertson, medical director for
the University Hospital, said:
"Brian Sternberg is still in criti-'
cal condition. Respiratory prob-
lems have stabilized. No fever.-
Traction may be increased.
"Probability of permanent pa-
ralysis is very high. No further!
condition reports will be made un-
less the aforementioned condition
changes."
The doctor's report was issued
at a news conference in which
Sternberg's parents discussed his
future.
They said he had told them:
"Watch the motion in my hand.
I am working on it now. Watch-
my fingers. I'm sending impulses
for them to move. I really believe
I'm going to make it."

Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan
GI
FOR SALE
600 CC BMW Like new $450. Call NO
3-2331 B7
HI FI-Garrard Rr-88 changer, Picker-
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rately. Sacrifice. Leave message for
Jim at NO 2-9890. B4
FOR SALE-Antique four-poster bed.
Call HU 3-5973.
WANTED TO RENT
WOULD LIKE TO RENT a house- or
apt from Jan 1-July 1, 1964, while
attending the U of M as a Post-Doc-
toral Fellow in College Administra-
tion. Have three daughters. Ref-
erences furn'd. Write, Robert A.
Bohannon, 1015 N. Juliette, Man-
hattan, Kansas. L
PERSONAL
My darling Cy,
I can't wait any longer. I have this
uncontrollable urge to hit you. I anm
waiting for an explanation.
Therapeutically,
Birch
F4
DEAR LADY FERG,
Lord Wug misses your endearing
communiques which used to appear
in this column...
-Friends- of Lord Wug
F5
Dear therapeutic ch,
BEWARE MR. O SHALL RETURN ...
YOU HAVE ONLY 57 DAYS LEFT.
More friends of Lord Wug
F6
Question for the day
DO YOU KNOW WHO SUBSCRIBES
TO THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY?
campus.)
Answer: The Daily staff members (in
addition to all other notable figures on
campus.)
Therefore, if You want to be known
as a notable, SUBSCRIBE now at $1.50
for the rest of the summer. Phone
2-3241.
F3
THE RESIDENTS of 706 E. University
proudly announce the birth at 4:15
a.m. July 5 of one pure white kitten.
Write Box 105 Michigan Daily with
suggestions for kitten's name.
TO A SELECT GROUP OF MEDICAL
STUDENTS:
It has been brought to the atten-
tion of this staff that a number of
bruised egos have resulted from the
lack of coverage ofrsports events in
which the "famed" Nu Sig fraternity
participates. We (I think) sincerely
regret this gross oversight.
Medicinally yours, ch F
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
'63 VESPA BS-1000 ml., luggage rack,
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665-9281
Z2'

HENLEY REGATTA:
Cornell Eight Wins Semi;
Amlongs Face Tough Finale'

Reverse Streak
BALTIMORE (P) - The
more Orioles clubbed Ray

Balti-
Moore

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s;fie^]19 !'
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;:

But Dear,

Everyone Do
Why don't
you order
your summer
subscription
the Michigar

eS!!
r
to
N!r

HENLEY, England (-) - Cor-
nell's national champion crew
overcame a spell of overconfidence
yesterday and rowed into the fi-
nals of the Grand Challenge Cup
of the Henley Royal Regatta.
The Philadelphia Amlong
brothers, Joe and Tom, also
stroked their way into the finals
of the Silver Goblets for paired
oars, and a Rollins College crew,
surprising themselves most of all,
made it to the semifinals in the
Thames Cup for lightweight
eights.
Cornell's lightweights, the East-
ern Sprint Champions, fell by the
wayside in the Thames Cup com-
petition, losing by nearly two
lengths to a Queen's College crew
from Cambridge.
Mile Distance
The finals, all rowed at the
Henley distance of one mile, 550
yards on the River Thames, will
be today.
Cornell's big boat came off the
river grumbling after they were
nearly caught flat-footed in the
semifinals by a squad from the
London Rowing Club. The Big
Red eight trailed for the first mile
Fleck Leads
Third Round of
Canadian Open
TORONTO (R) - Jack Fleck
of Los Angeles, the 1955 U. S.
Open champion, shot an even
par 71 yesterday to take the early
third round lead in the Canadian
Open Golf Championship with a
54-hole total of 212.
Dan Keefe of Wayland, Mass.,
shot 69 for a 213, to move into
second place among the early
finishers.

and only scratched out a three-
quarter length victory.
"The kids weren't happy," said
coach Stork Sanford. "I guess
they were a bit overconfident aft-
er beating the Germans yester-
day."
London in Finals
Cornell will face a rugged Lon-
don University crew in the finals.
The Amlong boys will meet
Chris Davidge and Stuart Mac-
kenzie of the British Leander
Club in the final. They have won
all their races by big margins but
should have a tough time in the
finals. Australian-born Macken-
zie won the Diamond singles
sculls here six straight years.
The Rollins crew went flat out
to win by one-quarter length from
another Cambridge boat, and
promptly called the whole trip a
success, regardless of how they
fare today.
"We frankly didn't expect to get
this far," said the Rollins cap-
tain, Edward Rudd.

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