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July 30, 1963 - Image 5

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Michigan Daily, 1963-07-30

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% JULY 30, 1963

l~L 0 93THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

MILLION:

Congress Hits 'Big Time'in Spending

Study Shows Absence
Of IntegratedSchools

CLASSIFIEDS

By PAUL DUKE
WASHINGTON-Along busy In-
dependence Avenue, a massive
marble palace is jutting into the
Capital's skyline.
By completion time next sum-
mer, the block-long, 10-story co-
lossus will have cost more than
$83' million. The sum is said to be
the most ever spent on a Govern-
ment building in the United
States, perhaps in the world.
Big Government spending?
Indeed so. More specifically, big
Congressional spending.
The elegant edifice, which will
provide new office space for mem-
bers of the House of Representa-.
tives, is costing more than the
combined sum spent for building
the Capitol and four other Con-
gressional office structures now in
use. It illustrates a significant -but
little-observed trend in Govern-
ment finance: Spending for Con-
gress and its affiliated agencies,
while still tiny alongside total Fed-
erel outlays, is rising at a faster,
rate than for the big executive
branch. Some members are feeling
pangs of conscience, but most seem
blithely unconcerned.
Whereas the nation's legislative,
budget totaled $59 million 10 years
ago, the lawmakers now are con-
sidering outlays of $168 million
for the fiscal year begun July 1.
During this same span, total bud-
get spending has increased from
$65.2 billion to an expected $98.8
billion. The latest year-to-year
budgeted. spending rise for Con-'
gress is due to approach 12 per
cent; for the executive branch the
ascent may be less than seven per
cent.
Expanding Payrolls
Congressional programs, pay-
rolls and privileges are all ex-
panding. The total number of"
people working in legislators' of-
fices, for Congressional commit-,
tees and in sundry other Capitol
jobs has swelled to 7,727 from
7,654 a year ago and 5,300 a dec-
ade ago; the Capitol Architect's
office, which acts as Congress'
housekeeper, has increased its
staff by nearly 50 per cent in the
past five years.
Eight 'U' Students
Work in Europe
Eight University students are
spending this summer working in
Europe, while ' ght foreign stu-
dents are"holding jobs in Michigan
business firms.
This exchange is a part of the
program established by the Inter-
national Association of Students
in Economics and Commerce, an
organization active in 38 countries.
The traineeships in foreign
firms last from eight weeks to
six -months. The trainee receives
living expenses as well as an
allowance.

Free mailings sent out by House
and Senate members cost the tax-
payers $4.9 million last year,
dwarfing the $1.2 million of a
decade ago. House members re-
cently voted themselves two more
Government-paid trips back home
each session; heretofore they have
had only one.
Though loud volleys against big
Federal spending echo through the
legislative halls, there is no econ-
omy wave in Congress for Con-
gress. A Republican task force has
been clamoring for. a $10 billion
reduction in President Kennedy's
budget proposals but has been
noticeably silent about Capitol
Hill cutbacks.
Never Cut Home
'The rule around here is that
economy never begins at home,"
wryly remarks a Northern Demo-
crat who believes it should. Com-
ments a Western Republican: "It's
a lot harder to point an accusing.
finger at the executive branch
when we ignore our own spend-
thrift habits."
Because Congress is generally
soft on spending for itself, a
double standard frequently pre-
vails in the allocation of Uncle
Sam's billions.
PARADOX: While many Con-
gressmen advocate frill-less fru-
gality in government, there is
little demand that Congress abide
by the same standards. House
budgetcutters recently exoriated
officials of the U. S. Travel Ser-
vice for shelling out $1,860 for
a rug for the agency's Tokyo of-
fice, but raised not a peep at an
outlay of $37,350 for snazzy new
drapes for some \50 Capitol win-
dows-a cost of roughly $700 per
window.
PARADOX: Though conserva-
tives complain about swelling Fed-
eral employment rolls, many favor
an expansion of the Congressional
bureaucracy for patronage pur-
poses. Some existing Capitol jobs
are sinecures, used primarily to
pay political obligations.
The Democrats have appointed
people listed on the rolls as male
telephone operators who don't per-
form such duties at all. A few
days ago, House Republicans had
quite a squabble over filling a
$13,000-a-year job formally de-
scribed as House Minority Post-
master; actually, this office-
holder does little except some poli-
tical chores for the GOP.
PARADOX: Criticism often is
hurled at the agriculture depart-
ment and other agencies for print-
ing too many free' booklets. Yet
Congressmen mail them out by
the thousands to their, constitu-
ents. Congress' own printing bill
is bulking bigger. Although the
Congressional Record costs $90
a page, it is crammed with ex-
traneous matter. Rep. William M.
Tuck (D-Va), who regularly at-
tacks federal waste, inserted the

minutes of his home county farm
board the other day.
PARADOX: Whereas Congress
maintains the General Account-
ing Office as a watchdog against
executive extravagance, there is
is no comparable unit to scrutinize
spending at the lawmaking level.
The architect's office, which
supervises Capitol Hill's building.
plans, is headed not by an archi-
tect but by a one-time Congress-
man. Moreover, there is the same
kind of duplication that occurs in
other federal spheres. Example:
The Capitol's janitorial duties are
split up among three different
business offices.
It is true some congressmen are
pressing for various reforms.
Among Republicans, they include
Representatives H. R. Goss (R-
Ia) and John Kyl (R-Ia) and Sen.
John Williams (R-Del); on the
Democratic side, Rep. Paul C.
Jones (D-Mo) and Senators Paul
Douglas (D-Ill) and William Prox-
mire (D-Wis).
"Congress should not only avoid
doing wrong; but avoid doing those
things which may look wrong even
if they aren't," Kyl cautions.
Among the proposals: A joint
House-Senate commision for bet-
ter planning of building projects,
an annual audit of Congressional
spending and lifting of the secrecy
that now enshrouds much of the
money-handling. A few would
even curb some of the sacred sub-
sidized services such as free medi-
cal care, reduced restaurant prices,
low-cost haircuts and the privi-
leges of buying at discout in Con-
gressional stationery shops items
ranging up to television sets.
"Those of us who are concerned
about creeping socialism should be
willing to do away with socialized
swimming, socialized meals, social-
ized flowers, socialized haircuts
and other unnecessary expenses,"
freshman Rep. Snyder (R-Ky) in
a recent House speech that shock-
ed some of his elders.
Much of the criticism is heap-
ed on Architect of the Capitol J.
George Stewart, whose office is
accused of harboring too many
grandiose plans, permitting too
many building goofs and for-
ever underestimating construction
costs. One of his schemes calls
for an underground parking ga-
rage beneath the Capitol grounds
at a cost of $22,000 per space.
Cut Funds
The hostility toward Stewart
burst into the open a few weeks
ago when the Senate voted to re-
voke his authority to proceed with
plans for a $20 million expansion
of the Capitol's west front. But the
House, more friendly to the archi-
tect, could reverse the verdict.
As it is, some lawmakers feel
Congress' self-pampering is basic-
ally to blame. When Gross re-
cently offered a motion to junk
plans for a House swimming pool,
only 26 brave souls supported

him. Even conservative Rep. Bruce
Alger (R-Tex), a fierce foe of
federal spending, spoke up for the
pool.
Last year Rep. Frank T. Bow (R-
Ohio) queried the architect's of-
fice about plans for remodeling a
House barbershop, suggesting it
should include more comfortable
seats. Result: Modernization with
new round-backed, cushiony seats.
More recently, Bow has made
news as chairman of this year's
Republican economy task force.
Sometimes Congressional em-
ployes take the rap for Congress-
men. Not long ago, there were
news stories about House clerk
Ralph Roberts' Government-paid
limousine being spotted at a Mary-
land racetrack. What the stories
didn't say was that Mr. Roberts
wasn't using the car; it had been
"borrowed" by three Democratic
members from Chicago.
Withal, morality on Capitol Hill
may be no worse than elsewhere.
At any rate, many Washington
offices are fancier than those of
the legislative branch. The Federal
Reserve Board meets around a
$12,000 mahogany table beneath
an $8,000 chandelier.
Copyright 1963, wall Street Journal

By HOYT HARWELL
ATLANTA (MP)-Fewer than one
in 100 Negro pupils in 11 southern
states are attending desegregated
schools, a recent study showed.
The study, "Token Integration
and Beyond," was published by
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith and the Southern Re-
gional Council, a non-profit, non-
political, biracial research and ed-
ucational organization.
Prof. J. Kenneth Morland, at
Randolph-Macon Woman's College
in Lynchburg, Va., summarized the
findings.
Integration Fear
He said continued segregation
was a result of "fear of integra-
tion itself" and "subterfuge in
complying with the Supreme Court
directive" of 1954 which ruled pub-
lic school segregation unconstitu-
tional.
The study, based on compila-,
tions in November 1962, showed
that Alabama, Mississippi and
South Carolina had no integration
at all in public primary and sec-
ondary schools.
Prof. Morland's findings dealt
with Southern and border states
school districts. They showed that'
31.8 per cent of biracial districts

CLASS SYSTEM:
Wenriek Notes Changes
In Today's Employment

"There is a basic difference be-
tween unemployment today and in
times past," Prof. Ralph C. Wein-
rich of the education school said
recently.
"During the depression we had
mass unemployment, today we
have class unemployment. The
categories of people hardest hit
SRC Receives
Research Grant
The Survey Research Center has,
received a grant of, $325,000 to
assist the Dominican Republic in
developing a program of socio-
economic survey.
The grant, given by the Agency
for International Development,
will be used by the SRC to do re-
search in the Dominican Republic
on current social and economic
problems.
The project will be headed by
Prof. Angus Campbell, director of
SRC. Citizens of the Dominican
Republic will be employed in re-
search, conducting interviews to
sample -public opinion on those
social a n d economic matters
which concern the government of
the Dominican Republic.

by unempoyment are youth, color-
ed, aging, uneducated. A person
in these groups is doubly or triply
handicapped in finding employ-
ment."
Prof. Weinrich notea that there
is a demand for workers in occu-
pations requiring education and
training. The greatest increase in
job openings will be in profes-
sional and technical work.
- Semi-Skilled Workers
The need for semi-skilled work-
ers will increase slightly, but there
will be no change in the oppor-
tunities for unskilled workers.
"Workers under 25 years of age
will account for nearly half of the
labor force growth during this
decade, even though they will
stay in school longer," Prof.
Weinrich added.
This means that employers will,
find they have a big stake in a
sound educational system. They
will have to employ a larger pro-
portion of young and inexperienc-
ed persons and provide more train-
ing on the job, Prof. Weinrich
said.
"Young workers will have to
prepare themselves for a rapidly
changing and more complex world
of work. They will need more edu-
cation and training," he con-
cluded.

have been desegregated in the
area.
An over-all percentage of 90.6
was listed for Delaware, District
of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland,
Missouri, Oklahamo and West
Virginia.
In the 11 other states, which
Prof. Morland labeled "resistant"
toward desegregation, 11.8 per cent
of the districts have been desegre-
gated.
States in which all school dis-
tricts have been desegregated were
listed as Delaware, Maryland and
West Virginia, plus the District of
Columbia.
'Resistant' States
In the "resistant" states, .4 per
cent of the Negro pupils were in
desegregated schools. In the oth-
er "compliant" states, Prof. Mor-
land said, the percentage was 51.1.
He said that state legislatures
passed at least 379 laws since 1954
in attempts to legally avoid com-
pliance with the Supreme Court
ruling.
"A basic method for keeping de-
segregation in public schools at
token levels has been through the
adoption of pupil placement laws,"
he said.
In actual operation, Prof. Mor-
land contended, these laws "have
been used with the assumption
that initial assignments could be
by race. Negroes have been assign-
ed to all-Negro schools and whites
to all-white schools, even though
ostensibly on criteria other than
race.
"In practice, the children who
have applied for transfers from
schools to which members of their
race have been assigned have al-
most always been Negroes. Thus
actual integration of schools has
depended upon whether Negro par-
ents and their children were will-
ing to go through time-consum-
ing, expensive steps to contest the
initial assignment."
A second anti-integration meth-
od, he said, has been "local op-
tion" provisions which allow com-
munities to close schools ordered
to desegregate.
Tuition Grants
"Another device for avoiding in-
tegrated schools has been the of-
fer of tuition grants to allow pu-
pils to attend private, nonsectar-
ian schools instead of public
schools," Prof. Morland said. "Six
states-Alabama, Arkansas, Geor-
gia, Louisiana, North Carolina and
Virginia-have passed such legis-
lation.
"Still another way of keeping
integration at low levels has been
the grade-a-year or stair-step
plan."
Prof. Morland said that if com-
munities "continue to try to main-
tain de facto racial segregation in
their public schools, they can be
assured of two things. It will be
futile in the long run, and it will
be costly."
He said the federal courts have
become "less and less patient" with
token integration plans and have
"blunted and eliminated" many
such plans.
"Federal courts," he concluded,
"are not going to permit the con-
tinuation of racial schools, and
states may well be faced with eith-
er closing all of their public schools
or extending integration beyond
token levels."
Wender To Speak
On Negro Voting
Susan Wender, 65, summer
field secretary for the Student
Non-violent Coordinating Com-
mittee, will speak on "Voter Reg-
istration Activities in Albany and
Southwest Georgia" at the Friends
of SNCC meeting at 8 p.m. today
in Room 3-G of the Union.

FOR SALE
VW LUGGAGE Rack. tarpaulin, $20. Call
NO 5-5162 evenings. B16
20 MINUTES from campus, year round
log cabin, 2 bdrm. screened porch,
fireplace, picture window views hill-
side and river. Approx. 3 acred fenced
wooded lot. Fruit trees, etc. Lake priv-
ileges. $9000. liberal financing. Call
Mrs. Burnstein, University extension.
200 N. Campus. B13
FOR SALE-Antique four-poster bed.
Call HU 3-5973.
REAL ESTATE
MUST SELL - Leaving state. 3 bdrm.
ranch with basement and screened
porch. 13,000 ft. lot, Ann Arbor. 665-
3203. R2
CALIFORNIA BOUND
One block from Haisley School. Large
lot, 10 large shade trees. Excellent
three bedroom home, study in full
basement, dishwasher. By owner. NO
3-0719. R
PERSONAL
LADY WANTS RIDE to Stratford
Shakespeare plays. Call NO 3-4543
after 6 p.m. F35
UNIVERSITY STUDENT can baby-sit
evenings, week-days or week-ends,
and during the day or Saturday or
Sunday.1Experienced. Dependable.
Phone 5-8130. F32
WANTED-Ride to Grosse Pointe Thurs-
day afternoon after 2 p.m. with re-
turn on Saturday morning. Call
Gloria Bowles, NO 2-7554. F29
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS.
HI, FI, TV, RADIO, and PHONO SER-
VICE. TV rentals, speaker reconing.
Free pick-up and deliversy service
CAMPUS RADIO & TV, NO 5-6644,
325 E. Hoover. X
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR

119 W. Washington

xi

HI F1 & STEREO
H I F1 & STER EO
PICKUP & DELIVERY
SERVICE & REPAIRS E
THE MUSIC CENTER
NO 5-8607
NO 2-1335
Guaranteed Diamond Needles
$5.95
304 S. THAYER ST.
1304 S. UNIVERSITY
USED CARS
TR-4-Best offer. Call 663-6990 or 665-
0625. N1O
VW '56, sunroof, R & H, WSW. Must
sell. 5-0012 after 6 p.m. on weekdays.
N9
'57 V-W.-Lov mileage. R. & H. Reason-
able. 213 Glen. N8
1960 FIAT-In good condition, less than
10,000 miles. Phone NO 2-2625. N10
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to cellege
students with which to buy life in-
surance. 25-35 married, 2 yrs. college
credit. No experience preferred. Write
Box 2, Michigan Daily. J1
665-8184
Manuscript typing, transcription, medi-
cal, legal, technical conferences, mim-
eographing, off-set. Quick-Accurate-
Experienced.

B. E. French & Co.
Sodas n Sundaes
French Vanila Ice Cream
for extra creamy richness

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Se red 11 a.m. to 8 P.m.

VIEUX

CARRE

215 State St.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
TUESDAY, JULY 30
Day Calendar
8:30 a.m.-Bureau of School Services
Leadership Training Conference-Mich.
Union.
8:30 a.m.-American Institute of CPA
Staff Training Program-Mich. Union.
1:00 p.m.-School of Education Film
Programs on Storytelling (produced by
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
German Club, Coffee Hour, July 31,
10-12 a.m., 2-4 p.m., 4072 FB. German
Conversation - Music - Singing - Re-
freshments. Herzlich Wilkommen!
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Room
3-G Union, Wed., July 31, 7:30 p.m.
William Bullard speaking.

the U-M Television Center)-"Tales:
Tall and Otherwise" and "Telling Stor-
ies to Children": Multipurpose Room,
Undergrad Lib.
2:00 p.m.-Audio-Visual Education
Center Film Preview-"Discovering Tex-
ture" and "Living Stone": Multipurpose
Room, Undergrad Lib.
3:15 p.m.-CIC Far Eastern Language
Institute Film Series-Japanese film,
"Portraits of Shame": Architecture Aud.
4:15 p.m.-School of Music Lecture -
Philip Duey, Professor of Voice and
Conductor of Men's Glee Club, "Im-
provisation and Ornamentation": Rack-
ham Amphitheatre:
7:30 p.m. - Linguistics Curriculum
Committee Linguistic Forum Lecture-
Winfred P. Lehmann, Univ. of Texas,
"The Laryngeal Theory: An Example
of Internal Reconstruction": Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Cercle Francais Presents the classic
film "Clochemerle" at 7:30 tonight in
the Multipurpose Room in UGLL
Colloquium in Theatre: Speech Dept.
will sponsor a colloquium at 3:00 p.m.
today entitled "Research Opportunities
in the Labroratory for the Performing
Arts" by, Joseph J. Wehrer. East Con-
ference Room, Rackham Bldg.
Colloquium in Speech Pathology -
The Speech Dept. will sponsor a collo-
quium by Dr. Fred Grundbacher, Dept.
of Human Genetics, entitled "Cleft Pal-

SUMMER
BARGAINS
FOR THE
'RECQRD COLLECTOR

et and Heredity." At 3:00 p.m., today,I
In the West Conference Room, Rack-
ham Bldg.
Doctoral Examination for Owen Rob-
ert Loveless, Linguistics; thesis: "The
Okinawan Language (A Synchronic
Description)," today, 2419 Mason Hall,
at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, Hide Shohara.
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Sept. 20. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Sept. 6.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
South Carolina State Hospital, Colum-
bia, S.C.-The hospital has a project for
the rehabilitation of the mentally ill &
Is seeking two clinical-vocational psy-
chologists. MA in Psych. required with
preference given to those with at least
1 year's exper. in vocational and/or per-
sonality assassment. Male or female.
U.S. Civil Service-Many & various
openings including: Supv. Research
Physical Scientists; Engineers (all
types); Physicists; Medical Record Li-
brarian; Nurses; Fiscal Accounts Supv.;
Clinical Psychologist; Hosp. Recreation
Specialist; Social Worker; Physical
Therapist; Med. Tech.; Manual Arts
Therapist; etc.
U.S. Public Health Service Hosp., Chi-
cago, 1II.-Medical ,Technologist-BS in
Med. Tech. or BS in Chem. (or one of
the biological sciences) & at least 1 yr.
of practical exper. or training covering
several fields of medical lab. work.
Wilson & Co., Inc., Chicago, 111. -
Project Engineer-Electrical or Struc-
tural Engnr. Some additional exper. de-
sirable, preferably in food or related
industry. Man selected w"ll have op-
portunity to handle all phases of proj-
ect from planning to completion. Also
Production Trainee-Degree Biology,
Chem. or related science field. Work in-
volves training for production supervi-
sion & assisting in laboratory controls
of prod. for our gelatin processing plant.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
King Strand Hotel, Beaver Island,
Mich.-Position open for waitress for
the remainder of the season. Experience
preferred but not necessary. Resort
closes after Labor Day. Women interest-
ed should contact the Summer Place-
mnent Bureau, 212 SAB for more informa-
tion.

Ann Arbor Professional Service
Associates 334 Catherine

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