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January 17, 1959 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-17
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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0

ncient,

,

I were ord
within two

s

S."

CUT OUT
AND SAVE

MOVIl

I

'Spy Author and Educator

By THOMAS KABAKER

ROBERT MAGIDOFF, now a
teaching fellow in the Slavic
languages department, once shot
to international prominence by
being the first man to be thrown
out of Russiaton thetgrounds that
he was a spy.
"I was awakened quite early In
the morning by the head of the
Moscow Bureau of the Associated
Press - my old boss before I went
towork with the National Broad-
casting Company," Magidoff said.
He turned in his chair to face
the window of his office although
his eyes never seemed to focus
on what was outside.
"It was then, for the first time,
. . just published
Leslie White's
EVOLUTION
OF CULTURE
McGraw-Hill Book Co.

I learned that my secretary had
accused me of spying for the
United States Defense Depart-
ment. The news actually came as
a relief after a week of suspense.
My wife and I had been followed
for seven days - it was spring
and you can always spot the po-
lice agents in the spring. They're
outside so much. They're the first
ones to get a suntan. We used to
call them the Sunburned Com-
rades.
"Anyway, I called our ambas-
sador, Walter Smith, and broke
the news to him. I asked for an
embassy car - not only to gain
time: I feared that I would be ar-
rested the moment I stepped out
of the house, and then I never
would get a chance to see the
ambassador at all."
HE TURNED back from the win-
dow and frowned. "Mr. Smith
wanted to give us asylum at the
embassy,"
He paused and seemed to be
making his decision all over
again. "I had to refuse. Despite
the risk, I couldn't run; that

would give the Russians the
chance they were looking for. In
a way it would be a confession of
my guilt. My guilt and the guilt
of the American Embassy. We
would wait and see what would
happen.
"My wife, Nila, and I left the
Embassy on foot. We were not
being followed. The Russians had;
their case and needed to know
no more about us."
ROBERT MAGIDOFF leaned
back m his chair and half-
smiled.
"It was strange about Cecelia,
my secretary. She was born in
Michigan. It seems her family mi-
grated to Russia during the de-
pression. I don't think she wrote
that letter. It had a certain in-
evitable, hackneyed style which
only comes out of the Soviet For-
eign Office. I suppose it wasn't
her fault; she was a Soviet citi-
zen and when the authorities tell
you to find something, you find
it,
What Cecilia found was a ques-
tionnaire which McGraw-Hill
sent to all its bureaus. (Magidoff
was the head of their Moscow
Bureau.)
"I had no information on the
first two questions, concerning
underground installations and
atomic research, nor did I have
any legitimate means of obtain-
ing the information desired, since
every aspect of such matters, in-
cluding their application to peace-
time industrial production, is con-
sidered top secret in Russia. I

"THE THIRD question con-
cerned Soviet air transport.
On the day I got the question-
naire the Soviet papers were full
of information in preparation for
Russia's "Aviation Day." There
was nothing in the answer to Mc-
Graw-Hill's question that didn't
appear in the papers.
"The truth is that I didn't even
write that story. My assistant did
it for me and the article appeared
in three magazines in the United
States with his by-line.
"Well, I went to the office and
wrote an answer to the charges
which the letter had brought
against me. The letter, of course,.

AND SO Robert and Nila Magi-
doff left the Soviet Union to
return to the United States and
for a brief while became celeb-
rities of international importance.
But people forget, and the world
forgot the first American to be
ejected from Russia as the world
entered the cold war.
"Covering the Soviet-German
war. That was the most interest-
ing," he said. "A most accurate
history of the war can be told
from the graves. I saw it at Sta-
lingrad. Neat graves with crosses
when the Germans were advanc-
(Concluded on Page 12)

NOW

DIAL NO 8-6416
Ending Tonight
"CITIZEN KANE"

:nmWs J; P.
TIP

ENDS
TONIGHT

"AUN

"BICYCLE
I'

TH IEF"

Awljr A1 irkijan &ziIg
MAGAZINE

Starting Sunday
"LOVERS OF
PARIS
(Pot Bouille)

*

Starting S
JERRY LEWIS in '
The Greatest Double La
Plays Jan. 25th I
"DON'T GO NEAR
THE WATER"
COMING FRIDAY,
E S , S N S
-WHOSEMRE MLI
Youwill seeandhearita#.,the wld
jaz horns..the parade of men..tt

Vol. V No. 4

Saturday, January 17, 1959

A Talk With Robert Magidoff
By Thomas Kaboker Page Two
Michigan's Search for More Doctors
By Lane Vanderslice Page Three
Dilemma of College Athletics
By Alan Jones Page Fine
Tunisia Today
By Ahmed Belkhodia Page Eight
A Liberal Education
By Harold Taylor Page Nine
Individualism in College
By Robert Krohn Page Thirteen
Herb Gardner--A Review
By Burton Beerman Page Fourteen
MAGAZINE EDITOR-David Tarr
COYER:-An eight-year-old Tunisian boy, bottom, is already profes-
sional in engraving silver plates and other metal work. See the
story on Tunisia on page eight.
Walk between library and Mason Hall is shown in top photograph.
Harold Taylor discusses liberal education on page nine.

also
TOM and JERRY
STARTING
THURSDAY
JAN. 29
"THE 7th.VOYAGE
OF SINDBAD"
in DYNAMATION

Starting Wed., Jan. 21
MICHAEL
REDGRAVE
a the British
Murder Mystery
"Time Without
Pity"
Starting Sun., Jan. 25 -
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S. - TUDAANAR1--
SATURDAY, JANUARY 17

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