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January 15, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIFulA1T DI

AN DAILY

CALLED SUB-STANDARD:
Ohio Educators Seek
Amish School Closing

Women's Judiciary Cou
Changes Lateness Penal
(Continued from Page 1

GEORGE RICHARD STORRY
.. talks on pre-war Japan
Storry Talks
On Japanese
George Richard Storry of St.
Antony's College at Oxford Uni-
versity compared the superpatriots
of pre-war Japan to a group of
"holy rollers" in the devout con-
gregation of an orthodox cathedral
in his lecture yesterday.
Comparing the Japanese popu-
lation to a great religious con-
gregation "trained in a single
ideal," he said the scattered groups
of superpatriots were looked on
"with distaste" by the clergy.
Saigo, one of Japan's national
heroes who is depicted by a bronze
statue in Tokyo which was over-
looked during the destruction fol-
lowing World War II, is a "proto-
type of the 20th century super-
patriot."
A teacher of military tactics and
a man of action, he was "both a
Robin Hood and Davy Crockett
rolled into one," Storry said.
In the early 19th century several
patriotic societies were formed,
such as the "Black Dragon" to
promote Japan's interests in Man-
churia. The superpatriots were
largely individualists including
criminals, professional trouble-
makers and bullies.
"The superpatriot group was to
a large extent composed of mis-
fits of Japanese society," he said.
"All of them were incorrigible in-
dividualists."

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TOM&JERRY in
"The Two ousketeers.

A battle is currently raging be-
tween Ohio school officials and
the Amish. a religious sect which
is using the Bible as their shield.
Primary points of contention are
the Amish schools and how long
children should go to school.
Both state and county officials
have inspected some of the Amish
schools and claim they are not up
to minimum Ohio standards. In
Ohio local districts have the re-
sponsibility for enforcing state
standards. Monday the state board
of education asked the state de-
partment of education to give as-
sistance to local authorities in en-
forcing requirements.
At Kenton, Ohio, the county
board of education has appealed to
the common pleas court to close
two Amish schools fof allegedly
failing to meet minimum stand-
ards.
An investigation by the school
superintendant Frank Blackburn
of two Amish schools disclosed
that some state-prescribed courses
are not being taught and that
three of the four teachers have
only attended school through the
eighth grade.
Paris Organist
To Perform
Jean Langlais, composer and or-
ganist from the Basilica of Ste.
Clotilde in Paris, will present a
concert at 8:30 p.m. tonight in
Hill Aud.
Included in the program will be
Bach's "Fuge in E flat," "Les
Mages" by Messiaen and "Rhyth-
mic Trumpet" by Seth Bingham.
"Communion de la Nativite -de
la Sainte Vierge" by Charles
Tournemire and "Finale from
First Symphony" by Louis Vierne
will also be played.
Langlais' performance will also
include several of his own cdmpo-
sitions entitled "Scherzando,"
"Pasticcio," and "Piece Modale No,
1."9
Langlais, who is blind, has at-
tended the Paris Conservatory of
Music where he worked with Mar-
cel Dupre and studied orchestra-
tion with Paul Dukas. He has giv-
en concerts in the United States
and Canada every year since his
first tour in 1952.
Actor To Give
Play Readings
Eddie Dowling, Broadway actor,
director, producer and playwright,
will present a lecture-recital of
excerpts "From Shakespeare to
Saroyan," at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow
in Hill Aud.
In the fourth of the current'
series of University Platform At-
tractions, Dowling will read por-
tions from "Richard IL" "Ham-
let," "The Glass Menagerie,"
"Time of Your Life," and "The
Iceman Cometh."
He will also include readingsa
from "Shadow and Substance,"i
"Angel in the Pawnshop" and
"Here Come the Clowns."7
Tickets may be purchased fromI
10 a.m. through 5 p.m. at Hill Aud.
box office.

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P'll- WANOWSOV,

+ Use

Carlos Faulkner, attorney for
the school board, said no infringe-
ment of religious rights or restric-
tiol of the number of schools the
Amish may want to maintain is
intended.
He said the only thing sought is
an injunction against the Amish
operating the schools as they now
do.
The Amish sect began in Swit-
zerland in 1693 when Jacob Am-
man thought that the Mennonite
Church's doctrine was too liberal.

Chislolm Explains Concepts
Defining Knowledge, Belief

vide for a 12 midnight closing for
upperclassmen and an 11 p.m.
closing for freshmen Sunday
through Thursday. Sophomore
stsnding will be determined by one
year of college attendance rather!
than by number of credit hours.1
In the procedure for signing
out, white slips will be assigned to
freshmen and pink slips to upper-
classwomen. Blue slips will still be
used by all women to sign out
overnight.
The individual housing units
may lock the doors or leave them

unlocked until 12 midnight at
discretion of the staff mem'
with regard to their own parti
situation.
These changes were propose
a committee which met be
Christmas vacation to discuss
alterations necessary in the
chanics concerning the new ho
The committee included repre
tatives from the Dean of Won
office, the business office, b
directors of dormitories
sororities, Assembly Associa
Panhellenic Association and W
en's Judiciary Council.
Two other changes in won
hours will also go into effect :
semester. F'reshmen will be gra
eight automatic Late P ermlssi
per semester, and housing i
will be closed to visitors at I
p.m. Sunday through Thurs
No changes will be made in
present weekend hours, ope:
hours or calling hours.
Individual housing units n
rwith the concurrence of Won
Judiciary Council, enforce an e
closing date for house meet
whenever they feel it necessary
Automatic Late Permissions
upperclassmen, special se
hours and the 45-minute exten
plan for University-sponse
events will be eliminated.

Daily Classifieds +

By GILBERT WINER
Socrates wanted to bring knowl-
edge under one definition but was
confronted with the problem of
distinguishing between knowing
and believing truly, Prof. Roder-
ick M. Chisholm of Brown Uni-
versity told a University audience
Tuesday.
The philosopher, lecturing on
"Know as a Normative Concept,"
said there is no easy answer as to
what knowing is -- it still remains
an elusive concept.
Offering an hypothetical situa-
tion to illustrate his argument,C
Prof. Chisholm said, "Suppose
there is a Prof. Fox in the audi-
ence whom I know by correspond-
ence only. You, the audience, see
him but I don't. What is the dif-
ference between your knowing and
my believing truly that Prof. Fox
is there?"
Questions Validity
Some philosophers argue that
knowing isn't a species of believ-
ing. Prof. Chisholm questioned the
validity of the statement that if
we know a species is man, we
know that he isn't an animal.
In examining "What you (the
audience) have in seeing Prof. Fox
that I don't," he doubted the value
of such statements as these : "Fox
falls within the cognizance of the
audience," and "the audience has
adequate evidence of Fox."
Furthermore, phrases like "know
that, see that, perceive that, rec-
ognize that and remember that"
are concepts based on subjective
intellectual perception, he pointed
out, emphasizing that such cases
are difficult to distinguish.
Prof. Chisholm remarked that
knowing may be a personal dispo-
sition. If not, the "grammar of
know" might be.instructive. Does
"I know" perform a function the
phrase "I believe" doesn't?
Notes Grammar
He noted that this grammar ana-
lysis only alludes to complexities
of the past and future tenses.
There rests a descriptive And per-
formative fallacy, the two being
incompatible.
One philosopher stated that
knowledge is "sui generis" and any
description of it would only apply
to something else. This alterna-
tive, frustrating as it may be, is
the only serious alternative to any
search of knowing,'Prof. Chisholm
added.
Presenting these arguments,
Prof. Chisholm then gave his
normative concept of knowing.
Viewing concepts of right and duty
from an ethical standpoint, he

I

Positively
Must Clos
Saturday

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U IT'S MAD!I1T'$ MARVELOUSI
IK-,Tl
AWYI

.DIA
NO 2-!

said that the audience has a prima1
facie right and duty to believe in
Prof. Fox. The audience also has
this prima facie duty to act upon
Fox and to give their word about
him
Citing grounds of evidence that
don't involve concepts of knowl-
edge, Prof. Chisholm concluded:
"Knowing may be explicated in
terms of a moral notion, the prima
face right to know."

Shows at 1:00 - 3-40 - 6:20 - 8:55

"win

Playing
Through
Saturday

b

DIAL
NO 8-6416

ORSON WELLES
in "the most sensational
product of the U.S. Movie
industry!" -TIME
"C ITIZEN

I

BROADWAY'S FOREMOST ACTOR, DIRECTOR,
PRODUCER, PLAYWRIGHT
In a Brilliant Lecture-Recital
"FROM SHAKESPEARE TO SAROYAN"
FRIDAY, Jan.16--8:30
Tickets $1.50 -$1.00 ... STUDENT RATES $1.00, 75c, 50c
Box Office Now Open 10 A.M.-5 P.M.

40

KANE.
Plus
De Sica's
"Bicycle Thief "

U O F M. PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

One Show Nightly at 7:15
"Citizen Kane" a 9 P.M.
Saturday Show Is Continuous From 1 o'clock
Sunday "LOVERS OF PARIS" (Pot Bouille)

# HILL AUDITORIUM;

mwmmwmm

wommom r,

...it's "Out of this

World"

S

ITUR

...Feb. 7, 1959

To be held at the
LEAGUE
from 9:30 P.M.-2 A.M.
Women's permission
4 MA.M

TOMMY DORSEY
ORCHESTRA
under direction of
WARREN COVINGTON

Tonight at 7:00 and 9:00
MARCEL PAGNOL'S
THE PRIZE
with Bourvil
SHORT: THE 'IMMIGRANT
with Charlie Chaplin
*
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
ROBT. PENN WARREN'S
ALL THE KING'S MEl
with BRODERICK CRAWFORD,

TICKETS
On Sale thru Friday
1-4:30 P.M.; Ad. Bldg.
during exams until Feb. 7
8 A.M.-noon! 1-5 P.M.
at 2503 SAB

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