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January 14, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY-_

SPORT-WHYS
.-- d. ne4

Tidwell Amazes
Wolverine Fans

A Job at Hand
THE ROLE of the student in the governing of University affairs
has become a paramount issue this semester. In fact, it has finally
wended its way into the athletic department. The latest group to fall
under criticism because of supposedly ineffectual student representa-
tion is the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics.
The ideas that have been discussed in reference to other govern-
ing groups are varied. Some people have felt that students should have
equal voice with administrators; others have felt that students should
have certain areas in which they are the last voice, while still others
feel that students should simply be in an advisory capacity, where
they can make their ideas known.-
In the case of the Board in Control, the situation is slightly dif-
ferent from most other boards and councils, since the subjects that
are under discussion are usually of a more technical and sometimes
economically crucial kind. Because of this, complete student control,
or even student control of certain areas, is not feasible, and such sug-
gestions haven't even been made.
However, there has been great criticism of the present set-up.
Many people feel that the students now representing the student
body are not good representatives for many reasons, and that they
also are not given a sufficient degree of power by the Board in Con-
trol.
Bored in Control.. .
THE PRESENT procedure calls for two student members of the
Board, one elected each year for a two-year term. Thus, it is
necessary that those running be either freshmen or sophomores, usual-
ly the latter. They are to be elected by the entire student body, al-
though few ever vote. However, those that do turn the process into
a popularity contest, since the majority of the candidates that run
are varsity athletes (other having little chance), and the most popu-
lar or biggest name is generally chosen.
However, the wbrst problems develop after the members are
elected, since they seldom serve adequately or are given the chance
to serve adequately. The present two members have attended few
meetingsthis year, for a number of reasons. In the first place, be-
ing on the football team, they were unable to attend meetings that
are always held on Friday evenings, because there were games Sat-
urday. One of the two pointed out that he was able to get to a few
meetings, but felt he should leave because they were 'discussing
coaches.
Nevertheless, there seems to be some indication that the mem-
bers often are not extremely interested. This is not to say that in-
terested and competent people are never elected by the present pro-
cess, but there have been many instances where a lack of interest
has been obvious. It is rumored that one of the present members
hasn't attended a meeting all this semester.'

I

By WAYNE MORTBERGO
Whenever a young sophomore
makes an auspicious start in his
varsity career, followers of the;
team are sure to make statements
that the yearling will be even bet-
ter when he has gained a year or
two of experiences.
However many basketball fans
are asking themselves if John Tid-
well can improve very much upon
his brilliant 37-point scoring spree
against Wisconsin yesterday. The
sophomore sensation clicked on 15
field goals and seven of nine foul
shots as he reached the zenith of
his young varsity career.
New Record
Tidwell's point total represents
a new Michigan single-game rec-
ord in Big Ten competition. How-
ever, Tidwell failed to make a foul
shot with ten seconds to play
which would have enabled him to
tie M. C. Burton's all-time high
of 37 points scored against Butler
earlier this season.
The soph star has been a con-
sistent point getter all season and
has on occasion flashed on de-
fense. One such defensive per-
formance was against All-Ameri-
can Don Hennon, of Pittsburgh, in
Tidwell's debut with the Maize and
Blue varsity. Although Hennon
managed to score 28 points, his
shooting percentage was well below
his usual high standards due to
Tidwell's close guarding.
Versatile Performer
The versatile sophomore has also
provided M. C. Burton and George
Lee with some help under the
backboards in addition to helping
Terry Miller with the play making
duties.

Most observers agree that Tid-
well has the potential to become
a Michigan cage great. So far this
season he has given every indica-
tion that he will live up to the-
rave press clippings he received
during his high school career.
The latest scoring averages re-
leased by the Big Ten seem to bear
out the contention that Tidwell
has made a resounding crash into
the collegiate basketball world.
Fourth Top Scorer
The high scoring backcourt ace
from Herrin, Ill. now holds fourth
place among Big Ten scorers for
the combined point total in both
conference and non-conference
games. The slim Wolverine star
has tallied 216 points in 11 games
for a 19.6 average.
Teammates Burton and Lee with
19.1 and 17.9 averages respectively
hold down the fifth and sixth slots.
Blaik Resigns
As Army
Head Coach
WEST POINT, N.Y. (A)- Earl
(Red) Blaik, who remade Army
into a football power when he
returned to his alma mater in
1941, resigned yesterday as head
coach and athletic director.
The resignation will become offi-
cial on Feb. 15 - Blaik's 62nd
birthday, and it will be a farewell
to all coaching. He's quitting foot-
ball for good.
"At the present time, there is no
personal commitment to any fu-
ture plan," he said, "though with-
in a reasonable time I shall accept
one of several opportunities either
in television or business."
Michigan's athletic director, H.
0. (Fritz) Crisler, said he was
"terribly sorry to hear that 'Red'
resigned. He is one of the greatest
coaches in the profession and we
are losing a very fine person. He

I.1

-Daily-Peter Anderson
OOOOPH!-John Tidwell, Michigan's amazing sophomore forward,
forces his way to the basket. The high-scoring yearling turned in
his best performance against Wisconsin, Monday, with a 37-point
scoring spree. He has already marked himself an "M' great.

EYES YARDLEY'S RECORD:
Petit Paces NBA's High Scorers

New Blood Needed .0..

SO, IT LOOKS like a change wouldn't hurt. The suggestion that
came before SGC last week, and was tabled until today's meeting
suggests that the number of students be increased to three. One of
them will now automatically be a varsity athlete, while the other
two will definitely not. The athlete, according to the suggested mo-
tion, will be selected for a one year term by all of the letter winners
and team managers in an election process yet to be arranged.
The big change is that the two other students will be selected,
according to the motion, by the President of the University from a
panel of names to be selected by SOC. To be eligible for these two-year
posts one must be a sophomore or junior and not a varsity athlete.
This would certainly be an improvement, but there are still many
areas that could be cleared up. For instance, some athletes :have
stated they still think the most popular athlete would be selected,
or else the one from the team with the greatest number of lettermen.
It seems the most reasonable solution would be selection of the same
sort as that suggested for the other two members: by a board, perhaps
the officers of 'M' club, and then appointment by some person, per-
haps the Dean of Men.
The selection of the other two members also could use some
clearing up. In the first place, one year terms would be more reason-
able, simply because it would eliminate the possibility of a poor se-
lection being in for a longer period of time,* and also would lessen
the chance of someone becoming disinterested, which seems to be
a problem with the present two-year terms. And it would certainly
be possible for someone to be reappointed if they are doing a fine job.
It would also be better if students of any year could be considered
for these two positions, including graduate students, since the idea
is to have those who know the most and have the most interest. It is
not fair to eliminate a group as large as the Michigan graduate school.
One final suggestion, and that is to have the Vice-President for Stu-
dent Affairs make the choice of these two, since he has greater
familiarity with the students than the University President.

By CLIFF MARKS y
Bob Pettit, star of the St. Louis
Hawks, appears to be well on the
way toward breaking the NBA
scoring record this year.
If Pettit continues at his present
scoring rate, an average of 29.1
per game, he can break the record
of 2,001 set last season by Detroit's
George Yardley. Yardley is sixth
in this year's race.
Hawks Ahead
Pettit's tremendous output is one
of the main reasons why the
Hawks are again running away
with the Western Division title.
It looks like the same old story
in the NBA as the Hawks' peren-

IME
SCORES

nial rival. the Boston Celtics, are
likewise making a shambles of the
Eastern Division, although the
Celtics have only one player in the
top ten scorers. He is Bill Sher-
man, who is ninth.
Distant Second
The Detroit Pistons are a dis-
tant second to the Hawks in the
West, closely followed by Minne-
apolis, with Cincinnati mired deep,
in the cellar.
New York is Boston's pursuer in
the East, with Syracuse third and
Philadelphia bringing up the rear.
The last-place Warriors suffered
a serious blow to whatever hopes
they had of improving their posi-
tion when they learned that 6'8"
center Neil Johnston would be lost
to the team for three weeks be-
cause of the recurrence of a knee
injury.
Leading Scorers
Johnston's teammate, Paul Ari-
zin, is holding down second place
in the scoring race behind Pettit.
Jack Twyman of Cincinnati comes
next, thus giving the two last place
clubs the second and third best
individual scorers, proving that a
team needs more than one high
scorer in the NBA.
Baylor Fourth
Rookie Elgin Baylor, of Min-
neapolis, is fourth in the scoring
race and he helped his average
Monday night when he poured in
30 points in a losing cause against
Boston. That game was played as
an experiment in Seattle where
Baylor went to college before a

crowd of 11,500 and Baylor didn't
let down his admiring fans.
In looking at the scoring race,
it is observed that the game aver-
ages are higher this year, and with
the possibility of Pettit breaking
the individual record, one can de-
duce that the 24 second rule which
the pros introduced a few years
ago has accomplished its pur-
pose, that of high scoring.
'M' Coaching
Job Refused
Jerry Hilgenberg, assistant foot-
ball coach at Iowa, yesterday
turned down an offer to join
Michigan's coaching staff.
The former Iowa All-America
center decided to maintain his
present position with the Hawk-
eyes.
Wolverine Coach Bump Elliott
was not available for comment.
Hilgenberg, it was reported, was
being considered for the position
as assistant line coach to Bob
Hollway. Hollway is expected to
move into the head line coach po-
sition.
Hilgenberg and Elliott developed
a close friendship when Elliott
was at Iowa.
Jerry Burns, also an assistant
coach at Iowa, turned down, an
offer several days ago.
No new names have come up
for consideration.

has a
nmade
ball."

COEDS
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for Winter will enhance
YOU!T
NO APPOINTMENTS NEEDED
The Dascola Barbers
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very inventive mind and has
a great contribution to foot-

FRATERNITY BASKETBALL 'B'
Phi Delta Theta 23, Pi Lambda Phi
12
Delta Upsilon 32, Delta Sigma Phi 14
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 41, Alpha Ep-
silon Pi 12
Theta Xi 2, Phi Kappa Psi 0 (for-
feit)
Lambda Chi Alpha 44, Delta Chi 17
Alpha Tau Omega 46, Phi Kappa
Tau 16
Sigma Chi 2, Phi Kappa Sigma 0
(forfeit)
Chi Psi 39, Theta Delta Chi 22
Sigma Nu 27, Tau Delta Phi 13
Chi Phi 62, Phi Epsilon Pi 12
Kappa Sigma 19, Phi Sigma Kappa
13
Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, Acacia 0 (for-
feit)
Alpha Delta Phi 18, Zeta Beta Tau
16
Delta Tau Delta 42, Zeta Psi 17
Theta Chi 19, Phi Sigma Delta 17
(overtime)
Phi Gamma Delta 2, Tau Kappa Ep-
silon 0 (forfeit)
Beta Theta Pi 42, Alpha Sigma Phi
20
Sigma Alpha Mu 38, Psi Upsilon 11

Search for Change ... .

AS SAID BEFORE, a change is certainly needed. SGC is in a posi-
tion to present a recommendation to the Regents, and there can
be little doubt that this should be done. All the parties involved should
be asked for suggestions, so that the best. solution possible may be
arrived at. Students will be able to offer something in such positions
only if the right students are selected in the right manner. The Job
at hand is to find this manner.

College Scores
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
George Washington 72, Richmond 64
Dartmouth 74, Harvard 56
W. Virginia 88, William and Mary 76
Miami (O.) 56, Ohio University 54
(overtime)
Baylor 70, Southern Methodist 53
Mem~phis State 75, Florida State 72
NBA
Detroit 112, Cincinnati 92
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