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January 13, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUMSDI

7I' Cagers

Defeat

Wisconsin,

84

=7--4

_. ... .. . , .r d Ibl lY

FST SEMESTER

Michigan in First-Place Tie;'
Tidwel's 37 Breaks Mark

4

(Continued from Page 1)
proved too weak and the Badgers,
sparked by the shooting of Brian
Kulas and Bob Barneson, whittled
the Wolverine lead down to seven
points with surprising speed.
This forced Perigo to put his
starting team back into the game
with 1:43 remaining in the con-
test.
Sink Four Free Shots
Wisconsin managed to narrow
the gap to five, but that was as
close as it got as Tidwell and his
backcourt partner Terry Miller
sank two crucial foul shots apiece
to put the game out of the Badg-
ers' reach.
Michigan opened the contest,
from a running start and literally
ran Wisconsin out of the game in
the first five minutes, piling up a
16-4 lead.
With the Wolverines' fast-break
offense working nearly to perfec-
tion for the first time in Big Ten
play, Tidwell scored eight and
Burton six of Michigan's first 16
points.
Small Crowd
Wisconsin bounced back quick-
ly to narrow the lead to 24-19 as
the two teams treated the small
Statistics

crowd of 3.000 in the huge 13.000-
seat field house to a fast. crowd-
pleasing brand of basketball.
M. C. Burton once again had a
great first half, clearing the
boards effectively to launch the
Michigan fast break. He also add-
ed 16 points to lead the Wolver-
ine scorers at halftime, but handi-
capped by four fouls which kept
him on the bench a great deal of
the time, he managed only one
point after the intermission.
Lee, Burton Clear Boards
Although scoring only 12 points,
well below his 21-point Big Ten
average, George Lee combined
with Burton to dominate the back-
boards.
Michigan started the second
half with a burst also-and quick-
ly enlarged its 38-30 lead to four-
teen points. Miller, playing his
usual good ball-hawking game,
took advantage of Wisconsin mis-
takes to add two baskets in this
burst.
The Wolverine guard ended up
with eight points, all in the sec-
ond half.
Rogers Plays Well
Gordie Rogers, who came into
the game midway during the first
half, after starter Lovell Farris
had drawn two quick fouls, played
his best game thus far in Big Ten
competition. The 6'6" senior cen-
ter scored nine points, four of
them coming on nice tip-ins.
The cold northern air didn't
seem to affect the Wolverine
shooting percentage, which was
one of the season's hottest. The
cagers made 39 per cent from the
floor in the first half, and boosted
by Tidwell's terrific second half
accuracy, wound up with an over-
all average of 45 per cent on 34
for 75. The Badgers remained
comparatively cold, making 29 out
of 91 for 32 per cent.
Tidwell had the. greatest game
of his short collegiate career,
playing against a former high
school teammate who guarded
him on several occasions. Badger
Ivan Jefferson, also a sophomore,
was a co-captain along with Tid-
well of the Herrin high school
team, which won the Illinois state
title in 1957.
Jefferson, who is one of a flock
of promising sophomores that
Wisconsin Coach Bud Foster used
in last night's game. He finished
the game with 13 points, to finish
third in scoring for the Badgers,
behind Barneson who had 17 and
Kulas who had 14.

-Daily-Peter Anderson
FINGERTIP CONTROL-George Lee, in his third season as one of the mainstays on the Wolverine
basketball team, lunges out to control the loose ballwith one finger in the recent Motor City
Tournament action. Lee was again in double figures last night, scoring 12 points as Michigan topped
Wisconsin, 84-74. The victory gave Michigan a first-place Conference tie with Indiana and Illinois.
INDIANA ALSO KEEPS PACE:
Illinois Outscores Ioaa 103-9 7

High Court
Rules IBC
monopoly'
WASHINGTON (A') -The Su-
preme Court yesterday knocked
out the International Boxing Club.
By a 5-3 vote, the high court
upheld the decree of a Federal
District Judge ordering the IBC
organizations of New York and
Chicago to break up their giant
prizefighting empire.
Speaking for the majority, Jus-
tice Tom Clark said the IBC had
gained a stranglehold on the fight
business and "an odorous mon-
opoly background which was
known and still feared in the box-
ing world."
Clark said that from all ap-
pearances its "illegal activity"
continues.
The decision was greeted glee-
fully by Cus D'Amato, manager of
heavyweight champion Floyd Pat-
terson. D'Amato has been carry-
ing on a bitter personal feud with
the IBC.
'First Good Break'
Calling it "the first good break
I've gotten," D'Amato said in New
York he now may put the champ
on view more frequently through
an independent promoter.
Patterson has defended his
crown only three times through
independent promoters since win-
ning it on Nov. 30, 1956. That was
when he knocked out Archie Moore
in an IBC-sponsored bout in Chi-
cago.
Truman Gibson, president of
the New York and Illinois clubs,
said the IBC would begin comply-
ing immediately with the court
order.
All eight Supreme Court justices
participating in the case agreed
the IBC had violated Federal anti-
trust laws. They split 5-3, how-
ever, on whether to uphold the
stiff dissolutionorder of Federal
Judge Sylvester J. Ryan in New
York.
Ryan ruled two years ago that
the IBC had monopolized cham-
pionship bouts from 1949 to 1953.
I-M

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
$ORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
JANUARY 19 TO JANUARY 29, 1959
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

I

I

Time of Class *

MICHIGAN
Lee, f
Burton, f
Farris, c
Tidwell, g
T. Miller, g
Rogers, c
R. Miller, g
Kingsbury, g
Robins, g
TOTALS
WISCONSIN
Biarneson, f
Jefferson, I
Gross, c
Kulas, g
Mills, g
Cliow, t
Stack, f
Dutrisac, >g
Serbiak, g
Stephens, g
TOTALS
HALFTIME:

FG FT PF
5 2-4 4
7 3-4 4
0 1-2 2
15 7-9 1
3 2-2 2
4 1-1 3
0 0-0 3
o 0-1 0
0 0-0 1
34 16-23 20
FG FT PF
6 S-56 2
5 3-4 0
4 0-3 1
5 4-6 5
3 142 5
1 1-2 1
1 0-0 0
1 0-0 0
1 0-0 1
2 2-3 2
29 16-26 17
Michigan 38, Wise.

TP
12
17
1
37
9
0
0
0
84
TP
17
13
s
14
7
3
2
2
2
6
74
30

By The Associated Press
CHAMPAIGN - Roger Taylor
and Mannie Jackson each scored
24 points last night to lead Illinois
to a 103-97 victory over Iowa in a
Big Ten basketball game.,
The victory was Illinois' third
against one Conference loss. Iowa
is now 1-2 for the campaign.
Shooting at a phenomenal .528
percentage, Illinois rolled to a 57-
41 lead at halftime. The Illini
stretched it to 22 points in the
second half and never were in
danger.
Wessels Adds 18
Iowa came within 10 points
several times but got no closer
than the final spread of six points.
Aside from the 48 points tossed
in by Taylor and Jackson, John
Wessels had 18 for Illinois and Al
Gosnell added 10.
Iowa haddfivescorers in double
figures. Dave Gunther was high
with 19= followed by Clarence
Wordlaw's 18 and Nolden Gentry's
16.
Indiana Barely' Wins
BLOOMINGTON-Indiana had
to shift from its new zone to its
old man-to-nan defense last night
and finally stopped Minnesota's

Gophers in a sizzling Big Ten
basketball game, 63-59.
Minnesota hit five more field
goals than Indiana, the edge be-
ing largely the deadly outside
shooting of Tom Benson. He hit
seven of 11 shots in the first half,
which ended with Indiana nursing
a 31-28 lead.
Free Throws Vital
The Hoosiers converted 21 of
29 free throws to overcome their
26-21 deficit on field goals. Per-
sonal fouls finally cost Minnesota
the services of Jerry Butler, 6'6"
sophomore, who held Indiana's
6'10%" Walt Bellamy to 12 points.
BIG TEN STANDINGS
W L Pct.
MICHIGAN ...... 3 1 .750
Indiana......... 3 1 .750
Illinois..........3 1 .750
Michigan State .. 2 1 .667
Northwestern .... 2 1 .667
Minnesota ....... 1 1 .500
Iowa ............ 1 2 .333
Purdue ......... 1 2 .333
Ohio State ....... 0 2 .000
Wisconsin ....... 0 4 .000
LAST NIGHT'S SCORES
Michigan 84, Wisconsin 74
Illinois 103, Iowa 97
Indiana 63, Minnesota 59

Bellamy got five more after But-
ler was whistled out of the game
with almost eight minutes left.
The score was tied 10 times be-
fore Indiana went ahead to stay at
56-55, on a layup by Gary Long,
with 4:44 to play.
Dull Three Minutes.
Minnesota pulled an odd stunt
in the first half while leading,
22-20. Coach Ozzie Cowles sent in
his second five and they passed the
ball around almost three minutes
without attempting a shot.
The Gophers had won their
only previous Big Ten game from
Wisconsin. Indiana's record is 3-1,
good for a share of first place.
Russian Icers
Rout Harvard
BOSTON (M-)-Russia's scientific
skaters, warming slowly to the
task, dissected outclassed Harvard,
11-1, in a hockey game before
11,880 fans at Boston Garden last
night.
Alexis Guryshev, Igor Dekonskii,
and Victor Prizahnikov scored
three goals apiece.

MONDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3

Time of Examination
Wednesday, January 21
Saturday, January 24
Tuesday, January 27
Monday, January'19
Tuesday, January 20
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Friday, January 23
Monday, January 2$
Wednesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Wednesday, January 28

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-15
2-5

U-P Selects
New Coach
DETROIT (P)-- The University
of Detroit, determined to get back
into the national football limelight
it enjoyed under Gus Dorais,
reached into the Big Ten yesterday
for a new head coach.
He is Jim Miller, defensive line
coach at Purdue the last four sea-
sons.
The 38-year-old Miller, who
learned his football under Paul
Brown at Massillon, O. High
School, where many gridiron
greats have had their beginnings,
will-be here tomorrow to sign the
formal contract.
Undisclosed Sum
Terms were not disclosed but
U-D officials said Miller will have
a free hand in selecting his assist-
ants. Miller also carries the title
of Director of Football.
The one-time Purdue lineman,
whose only previous college head
coaching experience came during
two seasons at Niagara University,
replaces Wally Fromhart. U-D
fired Fromhart Dec. 2 after his
1958 team produced a 4-4-1 record.
Tries To Regain Prestige
Under the Very Rev. Celestin J.
Steiner, U-D President, the school
has attempted to regain national
prestige. So far, the move has
been something less than success-
ful.
Fromhart, a former Notre Dame
quarterback, posted a 19-25-2 rec-
ord in five seasons but school
officials and alumni groups had
high hopes after his 1957 team won
six and lost only three.
Miller was the second Purdue
assistant coach to leave in a 48-
hour period. Only Saturday, Bill
Daddio resigned his Purdue job
to become an assistant coach at
Notre Dame under new coach Joe
Kuharich.

1

*Classes beginning
preceding hour.

on the half hour will be scheduled at the

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AD1INISTRATION

Accounting 100, 101, 200, 201
Finance 210
Ind. Relations 100, 200
Marketing 210
Marketing 211
Statistics 100, 200

Wednesday, January 28
Monday, January 19
Monday, January 19
Monday, January 19
Wednesday, January 21
Wednesday, January 21

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

INJURIES CUT RENFREW'S SQUAD:
M' Icers Lick Wounds After Double Loss to Tech

RESIDENCE BASKETBALL
Van Tyne 36, Michigan 30
Hinsdale 29, Huber 18
Lloyd 26, Allen-Rumsey 24
Taylor 53, Winchell 14
Cooley 45, Williams 23
Chicago 31, Strauss 23
Anderson 27, Green 26
Reeves 29, Wenley 27
Hayden 39, Gomberg 25
RESIDENCE BASKETBALL
Allen-Rumsey 24, Hayden 23
Scott 25, Cooley 23
Lloyd 29, Kelsey 27
Michigan 17, Wenley 11
Adams 22, Greene 12
Williams 20, Anderson 15
Taylor 39, Huber 17
Reeves 34, Van Tyne 32
Hilnsdale 50, Winchell 22

"A"
"B'*

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

By DAVE POHLOD
Michigan's hockey team had
just absorbed its second straight
loss to Michigan Tech in a rather
one-sided contest (10-2) Satur-j
day night, and the "home" locker'
room located deep within the con-
fines of the Coliseum was a
strangely quiet place.
The walls which had in the past
College Scores
Duquesne 85, Loyola (Chi.) 65
Nebraska 71, Missouri 69
Tennessee 65, La. State 58
Wayne State 63, W8. Ontario 53
Central Mich. 79, Ferris 41
Kansas 69, Iowa Statae 48
Kansas State 90, Oklahoma 45
Furman 87, South Carolina 63
Alabama 82, Florida 77
Wichita 61, Drake 54
Aquinas 8', Olivet 68
Kentucky 85, Tulane 68
Texas A&M 63, Arkansas 62
Wash. & Jeff. 77, St. Vincent (Pa.)
68
Cincinnati 64, North Texas St. 56
(overtime)
St. Francis (Pa.) 89, Morehead 77
Loyola (New Orleans) 69, Centenary
K 67

heard the victory celebrations of Michigan's futile effort to stop
six teams that became NCAA Tech Saturday night.
champions were now only mute For instance, left winger Gary
witness to a battered and ex- Mattson, after suffering a painful
hausted group of young men going broken nose in the first period,
through the motions of dressing still talked Renfrew into letting
and individually reliving every him return to the lineup later in
important play of the game just the game to help the undermanned
ended. Wolverines hold off the Huskies,
Hockey mentor Al Renfrew, a who were changing lines every
familiar figure in his red cap and minute and a half.
smoldering cigar, was telling a Or, for another example, one
small group of friends that with a could point to the play of defense-
few breaks it could have been a man Barrie Hayton, who played
different story, as well it might the whole game Saturday night,
have been.
For instance, if Wolverine left
wing Dale MacDonald had been Criser Mum
able" to out-maneuver Tech's su-
perlative goalie George CuculickPossible
on any one of his three break-On P s bl
aways in the first period, it might
have given the out-manned Michi-
gan squad the lift it needed to
bumps and bruises. LOS ANGELES, (W) - The men
For, as Renfrew said after the who make college football rules
game, "A team that's ahead always began a three-day meeting yes-
can find the strength to skate a terday.
little harder," A prime topic is sure to be pro-

leaving only when he was forced
to serve time in the penalty box.
Bobbie Watt, with 45 stitches
in his lacerated jaw, was also on
hand to lend a hand until he was
unable to continue playing.
Although the series was a tough
one for Renfrew to lose, he was in
no position to brood over it Satur-
day night. He had more immediate
problems facing him, as he had
seen his already injury-ridden
squad cut down once again.
This was shown only too graphi-
cally yesterday when only six
varsity players reported for prac-
tice.

WELCOME
STUDENTS!
Try us for:
* CREW-CUTS
" PRINCETONS
" FLAT-TOPS
Today!
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

Aero. 135
Ch.-Met. 1, Lee A, B, and U
C. E. 22
C.E.52
Drawing 1
Drawing 2, 21
E. E. 5
E. M. 1
E. M. 2
English 11
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
401
UT EI P SI
Botany 2
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 15, 182
Economics 71, 72, 173
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 153
English 23, 24
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31, 32,
61, 62
GeologyI1
German 1, 2,11, 31, 32, 35
Latin 21
Physics 53
Psychology 190
Russian 1, 2, 31
Sociology 1, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
401

Monday, January 26
Friday, January 23
Wednesday, January 21
Monday, January26
Monday, January 19
Saturday, January 24
Monday, January 19
Monday, January 26
Friday, January 23
Wednesday, January 21
Friday, January 23 7
tIENCE AND THE ARTS
Monday, January 19
Wednesday, January 28
Wednesday, January 28
Thursday, January 22
Wednesday, January 21
Saturday, January 24
Monday, January 19
Tuesday, January 27
Saturday, January 24
Monday, January 26
Wednesday, January 21
Saturday, January 24
Friday, January 23
Tuesday, January 27
Friday, January 23 1

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

{1

-10 p.m.
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
f-10 p.m.

_ _ _ _ _

t
3

COMPLETE
FORMAL RENTAL
S ER VICE,

It would be hard to single out
any one player as a standout in

YALE CHIEF CONTENDER:
Michigan Eyes NCAA Swim Crown

By BILL ZOLLA

Michigan's defending NCAA
swimming champions last Satur-
day appeared to eliminate two
sources of competition from their
path to a third consecutive crown.
By soundly trouncing Michigant
State and Indiana, the Wolverines
showed their enormous depth and
power. But the Big Ten Invita-
tional was a series of relays. How
will the Wolverines do in meets
with mainly individual events,I
when depth will not be as im-
portant?
"Consistently Good"
"M" swim coach Gus Stager
1'Aflhied,"We shoul~d dona-, well in

boost in an indirect sort of way
last week.
Southern California, acknowl-
edged to have the second-best
swim team in the nation, was ban-
ned by the NCAA from competing
in events sponsored by or associ-
ated with that group.
With Southern California out of
competition, Yale has moved into
the position as the prime challenge
to Michigan supremacy. The Eli
have the same team as last seasqn,
and will be bolstered by some top
newcomers.
Ohio State, whose swimmers did
not compete in the Big Ten Relays
due to a previously scheduled meet,

Gerlach, were unable to compete,
Kimball being at a gymnastics
contest and Gerlach ineligible until
next semester.
Alvaro Gaxiola and Bob Webster,
the men who did dive Saturday
and lost by only a single point, are
only the third and fourth men on
the squad. Tony Turner, another
"M" diver, who beat Gaxiola on
Friday night against Iowa State,
was given a rest.
Thus, the Michigan divers also
look as if they should be able to
win in the NCAA meet.

posals to put the goal posts back
where they were 28 years ago-on
the goal line.
H. 0. (Fritz) Crisler, Michigan
Athletic Director and chairman of
the NCAA Rules Committee, re-
fused to discuss the closed-door
talks.
But re-locating the goal posts--
bringing them from ten yards back
of the goal line right up to it-has
been sought by many coaches.
Crisler did say that rules written
a year ago would be reviewed. Most
controversial of these include the
two-point conversion rule, liberal-
ized substitution, and the use of
arms and forearms in blocking.
Lou Little of Columbia said his
Coaches' Advisory Committee
would recommend keeping the
two-point conversion rule.
Crisler said no definite news
would be released until after the
final meeting tomorrow afternoon.

T ice &SWre
1107 S. University Ae,
STORE HOURS: 9 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.
WORRIED?
EXAM TIME
is Outline Time
If ~( Use our condensed

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported.for adjustment.
See Instructions posted outside Room 441 W. E. between Decem-
ber 10 and 20.
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES

11

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