100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 11, 1959 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, Ji

ArUT,! TCUTf:AN UATTY

ttT~~ bT~SUDY
FIT REU~i ~ER.jE E ~tU~ Z~r.RUJ z

_

M'

Cage rs

Edge

Buck~eyes

on

TV,

78 74

GRADUAT ES
(By August of 1959)
(Salary $4802 to start)
STATE GOVERNMENT
OFFERS COMPREHENSIVE
TRAINING PROGRAMS
IN:

PORT-WHYS
Who's Who in '59
HE ANNUAL winter intrigue held by the collegiate football coaches
is all over for another year. For the past week the coaches, ath-
letic directors, faculty representatives, and most of the other import-
ant persons from all college athletics departments have been tossing
around ideas in Cincinnati.
- Whether anything comes of these ideas, of course, will depend
on the subsequent meetings of the NCAA Football Rules Committee,
and the other groups that will take final action on most of the
suggestions.
There appear to be two major rules changes undergoing an in-
cubation period at present. It looks like college football fields may
look more like their professional counterparts next fall, as the Rules
Committee may decide to move the goal posts back up to the goal
line. They have been at the end of the end zones since the 1930's.
The other change will also lean toward professional football, as
there is a chance that free substitution, or something close to it,
may be back in force. There can be little doubt what inspires either
of these changes, since they both will make college football more
like the professional game - which, by the way, is quite a financial
success at present.,
Elliott Needs Coaches .. .
THE GAME of college football may or may not change as a result
of the Cincinnatai meetings, but there can be no doubt that foot-
ball fortunes at Michigan have taken some sort of turn. This was
Hump Elliott's first meeting as head coach, and one of special im-
portance to him, since he is still searching for a staff to help him
guide the Wolverines this coming year.
Since he needs to have a staff by April for spring practice, ande
obviously he will want to have plenty of time beforehand to work
on plans, the chances are that Elliott will want to get his choicesU
to the Regents at their monthly meeting this Friday.t
There are a number of positions that have to be filled: in fact,
they all may be. The Michigan coaching staff in the past has con-
sisted, besides the head coach, of a backfield coach and assistant, a1
line coach and assistant, and an end coach, plus the freshman coach.
Of this troupe, line coach Jack Blott, assistant line coach Bob Holl-
way, end coach Matt Patanelli and freshman coach Don Dufek,
remain from Bennie Oosterbaan's reign.
There have been a number of well-calculated guesses offered by
people who should know, and the majority of these say that only
Hollway and Dufek will remain when Elliott is through selecting his1
crew. It is rumored that Hollway will move up to the head line coach
Job, while Dufek will remain with the freshmen.
It seems that Blott and Patanelli will be moved to other ath-
letic department posts, either in the I-M system, or to assistantships.
in other sports. At present Patanelli is an assistant in both basket-
ball and baseball, and is one of the scouts for football and basketballl.
Some Will Be New.. ..
WHETHER OR NOT he retains the present holdovers, Elliott has
a number of positions to fill. The most important one, and the
one that has caused the most controversy and guesswork, is that of
backfield coach. A number of names have been mentioned, including
Jerry Burns (Iowa backfield coach), Dave Nelson (head coach at
Delaware) and Hank Fonde (Ann Arbor high school coach).
Apparently Burns has gone by the wayside, as he has had a num-
$er of offers for head coaching positions, and he has a great winning
combination under him at present. He will either stay or move up.
Nelson, of course, would be moving down in rank, and also seems
uninterested.
A number of factors point to Fonde as the man. First of all, he
and Elliott played on the same 'M' team (Fonde was understudy to
Elliott at right halfback), and they have always been close friends.
Up until last season, Fonde had a fabulous winning percentage with
the Pioneers (65-4-2). This year's squad, however, split at 4-4, and it
is certainly time to get out while he still has a record superior even
to Paul Brown's famous Massillon teams.
Not only that, but Fonde was assistant principal at Ann Arbor
until he resigned that position to concentrate on coaching this fall.
This came after Oosterbaan's secret spring resignation, and Elliott's
knowledge that he would be taking over.
Presuming that Hollway moves up to head line coach, Elliott will
be seeking an assistant. The big name so far has been Jerry Hilden-
berg, who holds that position at Iowa presently.
The other positions have engendered no scuttlebutt, since they
will not appeal to name men, and will probably be filled with re-
cently-graduated M' players. Elliott, only 33, is the youngest head
coach in Michigan history, and it seems that he will be heading the
youngest staff ever. By .next Friday, in any case, this should all
come, out.

* ECONOMIC RESEARCH
EMPLOYMENT COUNSELING
*HIGHWAY PLANNING
*PERSONNEL
INSURANCE EXAMINING
INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT
PROPERTY APPRAISING
RIGHT OF WAY BUYING

I

.L 5J- -.F.A
GEORGE LEE (35) AND JOHN TIDWELL (43) SCORE FOR MICHIGAN AS THE

TV CAMERAS SEND THE GAME TO A REGIONAL ALDIENCE

THE MICHIGAN CIVIL SERV-
ICE COMMISSION is now re-
cruiting applicants for its spring
examination program. A large
number of trainee positions in-
volving extensive on-the-job
development programs will be
filled from this examination.
These positions lead to full
professional status in a given
field.
APPLICANTS must be college
graduates by August, 1959.
Varieties in majors required ac-
cording to class, Those classes
starred require submission of
a transcript of your college
credits.
WRITE for application for ex-
amination before January 28,
1959 to Michigan Civil Service,
Lansing 13. Examinations to be
held on Saturday, March 7,
1959 on the campus if the
number of applicants warrant.

Wolverines Fight Off Ohio State Surge;
Lee's 23 Heads Scorers, Burton Bags 21

Statistics '

(Continued from Page 1)
in - giving the hosts a 66-63
edge.
The score came only moments
after the Ohioans had missed six
tip-in attempts in one backboard
scramble.
Lee was the next aid to the
Michigan cause, as he tipped in a
goal, pulling his mates out in
front, 68-65. A minute later, it
was Tidwell hitting from the out-
side to quench Ohio hopes.
Then, with 1:14 to play, Miller
sank the first pair of five straight
M i c h i g a n f r e e t h r o w s that
clinched the victory.

The members of this quartet,
each scoring in double figures for
the third straight league game,
zombined for 70 of the Wolver-
ines' 78 point total.'
Lee's 23 spearheaded the attack,
while Burton had 21, Miller 14,
and Tidwell 12.
Going into the game as under-
dog, Ohio jumped to a quick 4-0
lead, then boosted its margin to
6-1 for the biggest gap it had all
day.
Lee Hits First
Lee~hit on a jump shot and two
free throws a few seconds later to
get the Michigan attack rolling.
It was his shooting and Burton's

BIG TEN CAGE:
Hoosiers Dump 'Cats*
MSUPurdue Victors

By The Associated Press
EVANSTON, Ill.-Indiana's de-
fending Big Ten basketball cham-
pions handed Northwestern its
first Conference loss of the season
last night. 76-69, behind a bal-
ancea scoring attack and a tight
zone defense.
All five Indiana starters scored
in double figures. Walt Bellamy
and Herbie Lee led the way with
18 points each. Gene Flowers had
17, Frank Radovich 13 and Bob
Wilkinson 10.
Indiana, scoring its second tri-
umph in three league games,
spurted to a 34-20 lead in the first
half but Northwestern came and

cut the margin to five points at
halftime, 38-33.
im * * *
MSU 97, Illini 96
CHAMPAIGN, Ill.-John Green's
rebound basket in the last eight,
seconds after teammate Bob An-
deregg missed a free throw yes-
Iterday gave Michigan State a
97-96 victory over Illinois.
Green hit 23 of his 33 points in
the first half as fifth ranked MSU
came from behind for a 54-36 lead
at intermission after hitting .568
per cent of its floor shots.
The Spartans, gaining their sec-
and Big Ten victory in three starts
and handing Illinois its first con-
ference loss in three games, built
up a 68-56 margin with 15 minutes
to go.
Purdue 84, Wisconsin 61
LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Purdue's
Veteran Boilermakers, upset in
their first two games, got back in
form last night with an 84-61 vic-
tory over Wisconsin's Badgers.
Six-foot-six Brian Kulas of Wis-
consin was high scorer of the game
with 26 points, but no other Bad-
ger got over 10.

rebounding that spoiled Ohio's
chances for a first half lead.
But Ohio, shooting a 40 per
cent average from the floor dur-
ing the initial half, wouldn't al-
low Michigan to get a spread
either.
Michigan came out with a zone
defense in the second half that
stunned the visitors completelyj
for the first eight minutes.
New Defense
Perigo stated after the game
that this was one of only three
times that he used a zone since
he began coaching here.
"We had to do something to
protect the middle of our defense
against Huston," he said. "The
zone also set up our fast break."
The breaking game enabled'the
Wolverines to get their 11-point
margin. But then Hoyt and Hus-
On Radio
Michigan's basketball team
will leave at 2:30 p.m. today for
Madison, Wis., where it will
meet Wisconsin in a Big Ten
clash tomorrow night.
The game will be broadcast
by WUOM-FM, 91.7 megacycles,
at 8:55 p.m. (Ann Arbor time).
Announcing the game will be
Bill Stegeth.
ton began piercing the zone withI
their deadly shots.
Two Bucks Score
The pair combined for 24 of the
Bucks' last 30 points.
Their shooting helped Ohio
edge Michigan, 35-33, on field
goals. But the losers' cold night
on free throws - they hit only
four of 12 tries - proved costly.
In their first Big Ten game this
year, they made 26 of /29.
Fouls Help
Meanwhile, Michigan stepped to
the charity line and sank 12 of
21 attempts,
Michigan had only' 10 fouls
called on its team - its lowest
total this year.
It was this low foul total and
late-game poise that prompted
Perigo to comment: "We are be-
coming a real steady ball club."

OHIO STATE
Furry, f
HOyt, f
Husaton, c
Niehaus, g
S ieg fried, g
Roberts, f
Barker, g
TOTALS
MICHIGAN
Burton, f
Lee, f
Farris, c
Tidwell, g
T. Miller, g
Rogers, c
TOTALS
H1ALFTIME:
Ohio State 34

35 4-12 16

FGFT PFTP

FG
4
7
10
4
6
4
0

8 5-9
10 3-5
2 0-2
5 2-3
6 2-2
2 0-0
33 12-21

1 21
a 23
4 4
4 12
0 14
1 4
10,78

FT PF
0-0 2
1-1 2
1-1 2
1-5 5
1-3 3
0-2 2
0-0 0

TP
8
15
21
9
13
8
0
74

Michigan 36,

lave aWORLD of FUN
T ravelwith HT
. Unbelievable Low Cost
, O Days from $645
43-65 Days fm$998
o many fours include
college credt.*
SE 9 Also low-cost trips to Mexico
1 $169 up, South America $699 up,
tiawaii Study Tour $549 up and
Around the World $1798 up.
Ask Your Travel Agent
26th 332So. Midign Ave.
Year W tULB t. mC. Chkago 4, HA 7.SS

_. -- .
i

Subscribe

Who isn't at exam time? But the
dog days will soon be over and
(so they tell us) a new era awaits.
When that breathing spell comes,
maybe you should take a glance at
the future. Have you given much
thought to financial planning?
Probably not. That's why we sug-
gest a talk with our campus
representative. Starting your life
insurance program now gives you
a head start, and offers the
advantage of lower premiums!
227 MUNICIPAL COURT BLDG.
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
NO 3-4151
PROVIDENT MUTUAL
Life'Insurance Company
of Philadelphia

I

..- (By the Author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boysl"and,
"Barefoot Boy with Cheek.")

I

I ____

THE DATING SEASON

to The

Michigan Daily

I have recently returned from a tour of 950,000 American col-
leges where I made a survey of undeirgraduate dating customs
and sold Zorro whips. 1 have tabulated my findings and I am
now prepared to tell you the simple secret of successful dating.
The simple secret is simply tiis: A date is successful when
the man knows how to treat the girl.

t

V
" '

.t i
4+ ,. ' ,
. s

1

STANDINGS
W
Minnesota........ 1
MICHIGAN ....... 2
Michigan State .... 2
Illinois. ........ 2
Northwestern ..... 2
Indiana .......... 2
Iowa ..i.......... 1
Purdue .......... 1
Ohio State ........ 0
Wisconsin.........0

L
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3

Pet.
1.000
.667
.667
.667
.667
.667
.500
.333
.000
.000

MICHIGAN EDGES IOWA, 56 -55 H:
Gymnasts Defeat Hawkeyes, Gophers

Special to the Daily
IOWA CITY, Ia. - Michigan's
gymnastics team got off to a win-
ning season here yesterday after-
noon as they nipped Iowa by a
single point and swamped Minne-
sota in a double dual meet.
Coach Newt Loken's Wolverines
had to come from behind in the
last event to nose out the Hawk-
eyes, 56 V2,-551', while they easily
disposed of the Gophers, 73-39.
With the pressure on, Michigan
tumblers Bill Skinner, Jim Brown
and Dick Kimball placed second,
third and fourth behind Iowa's
Staffan Carlsson to outpoint the
Hawks, 9-7, in that event.
'Best Ever'
"Those three boys turned in
their best tumbling performances
ever," Loken declared. "They cer-
tainly came through in the clutch."
In the other event the Wolver-
ines depended on good team depth
to stay even with the Iowa squad,
and the same depth completely
crushed Minnesota,
Sophomore Rich Montpetit per-
formed well, getting firsts on the
side horse and in free exercise
against Minnesota, plus four sec-
onds. one third and one fourth
in other events against the two
teams.

last year, place third, while Iowa's
other trampoline aces, John Mc-
Curdy and Bill Buck, were fourth,
and fifth.
Iowa's top man was Carlsson,
who took three other firsts be-
sides tumbling. He was one of the
top men in the Conference last
year, but will graduate this Feb-
ruary, and will not be around for
the 1959 championships.
MINNESOTA MEET
FREE EXERCISE: I. Monpetlt
Mich.), 2. Dozauer (Mich.), 3. Hoech-
erl (Minn.), 4. Marion (Mich.), 5.
Roller (Minn.)
TRAMPOLINE: 1. Kimball (Mich.),
2. Cole (Mich.), 3. Newman (Mich,.),
4. Webster (Mlinn.), 5. Wolf (Minn.)
HIGH BAR: 1. Hoecherl (liinn.),
2. Dozauer (Mich.), 3. Stall (Michi.),
4. Marion (Mich.),.5. Webster (Minn.)
PARALLEL BARS: 1. H o e c h e r l
(Minn.), 2. Monpetit (Mich.), 3.
Marion (Mh.) 4. Dozauer (Mich.), 5.
Roller (Minn.)
SIDE HORSE: 1. Monpetit (Mich.),
2. Hoecherl (Minn.), 3. Stall (Rich.),
4. Roller (Minn.), 5. Marion (Mich.)
STILL RINGS: 1. Schwartztops
(Minn.), 2. Marion (Mich.), 3. Iloech-
f

erl (Minn.). 4. Monpetit (Mich.), S.
Dozauer (Mich.)
TUMBLING: 1. Skinner (:Mich), 2.
Brown (Mich.), 3. Kimball (Mich.), 4.
Wolf (Minn.), 5. Roller (Minn.)
TOTALS: MICHIGAN 73, MINNE-
SOTA 39,
IOWA MEET
FREE EXERCISE: 1. Carlsson (1),
2. Monpetit (M), 3. tie-Claus (1), and
Dozauer (1), 5. Buck (1)
TRAMPOLINE: 1. Kimball (M), 2.
Cole (M), 3. Tim (1), 4. McCurdy (I),
5. Buck (1)
SIDE HORSE: 1. Buck (1), 2. Mon-
petit (M), 3. Stall (1), 4. Marion
(MT), 5. Carlsson (I)
HIGH BAR: 1. Carlsson (1), 2. Mon-
petit (M), 3. Claus (1) 4. Dozauer (M),
5. Marion (1I).
PARALLEL (BARS: 1. Carlsson (1),
2. Buck (I), 3. Monpetit (M) 4. tie-
DIozauer (I) and Marion (1).
STILL RINGS: 1. 'Marion (M), ?.
Novak (I), 3. Carlsson (I), 4. Mento
(I), 5. Dozauer (M).
TUMBLING: 1. Carlsson (I), 2.
Skinner (1), 3. Brown (M), 4. Kim-
ball (M), 5. Buck (1)
TOTALS: MICHIGAN 56', IOWA
551.

For that "Regal" effect
n - for i-Hop 59 -
~ 131EAUTIFUL
0~ 0
NECKLACES
BRACELETS
EARRINGS & PINS
BRUNDAGE GIFTS
307 SouTiH SrA ii Sumii T
-4- C}-}{}, ,}{}*C' ---Cot^---}}{) ---yC ---( --- - ) « { ----y } --- o

And how does a girl like to be treated? If you want to know,
read and remember these four cardinal rules of dating:
1. A girllikes to be reated With respect.
When you call for your girl, do not drive up in front of the
sorority house and yell, "I ey, fat lady !" (Aet out of your car,
Walk respectfully to the door. Knock respectfully. When yourr
girl comes out, tug your forelock and say respectfully, Good
evening, Your Honor." Then offer her a Marlboro, for what
greater respect can you show your girl than to offer Marlboro
with its "better makin's," fine flavor and new improved filter? It
will indicate immediatelythat you respect her taste, respect her
discernment, respect her intelligence. So, good buddies, before
going out on a date, always remember to buy some Marlboros,
noW a'ailable in soft pack or flip-top box at your friendly
vending machine.
. A girl likes a good lister.
Do not monopolize the conversation. Let her talk while you
listen attentively. Make sure, however, that she herself is not
a good listener. I recollect a date I had once with a coed named
Greeleve-Sgaoosa ovey grlut unforunateyalener,
not a talker. I too was a listener so we just sat all night long,
each with his hand cupped over his ear, straining to catch a
word, not talking hour after hour until finally a policeman
caMe by and arrested us oth for vagrancy. I did a year and a
day. She got by with a suspended sentence because she was
the sole support of her aged housemother.
If. A girl lils to be tk10n to nice placs.
B"'nice"pl"es I do notmeanexpensive places. A girl does
not demand luxury. All she asks is a place that is pleasant and
gracious. The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, for example. Or
Alount Rushnore. Or the Taj Mahal. Or the Bureau of Weights
and Measures. Find places like these to take your girl. In no
circulnutances mu.t you take her to an oil-cracking plant.
4. A girl lkes a man to bc well-informed.
CQome prpare pd ith a few interesting facts that you can
drop casually into the conversation. Like this: "Did you know,
nookiepuss, that when cttle, sheep, camels, goats, antelopes,
and other members of the cud-chewing family get up, they

,

71

RICHARD MONPETIT
,.. side horse winner

I

where will YOU live
Next Semester?
in Co-ops you get:
.-- mk ^ A . . .U.I I .I - . . ^,

'-

WORRIED?
EXAM TIME
is OutlinenTime
Use our condensed

I

I

III

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan