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January 08, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-08

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TLE MICHIGAN DAILY

TOPS FOR 1959!
COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING
Tonsorial Queries Invited
TRY US! d
DASCOLA BARBERS
neor Michigan Theatre
Read Daily Classifieds

College Scores
Texas Christian 52, Arkansas 45
Georgia Tech 66, Georgia 62
Slippery Rock 101, Alliance (Pa.) 94
Temple 86, Pitt 73
Maryland 64, Duke 33
Rutgers 87, Delaware 58
Dayton 57, Duquesne 47
Bowling Green 86, Western Mich. 65
Fordham 86, Long Island 5
illsdale 56, Eastern Michigan 55
LaSalle 70, Bucknell 68 (ovt.)
Utah 71, Montana 69

Russian

Coach Pra

ises M'-MSU Icer
Tarasov Says Americans Superior
To Student Hockey Teams in USSL

U

SHOE SALE

On Entire Stock

There will be a double swim
feature here this weekend, with
the Big Ten Invitational Relays
Saturday at 2 p.m., preceded by
a dual meet with Iowa State to-
morrow night.
Swimmers from seven schools-
Michigan, Michigan State, Indi-
ana, Ohio State, Western Ontario,
Iowa State, and Kenyon will per-
form at the fourth annual Relays.
The Buckeyes will bring only their
divers, though, because of a pre-
viously scheduled meet with Miami
(0.).
( Predict Close Battle
Coach Gus Stager commented,
"The meet should develop into
two tight battles, with the three
Big Ten teams fighting for the
title. The other entries have
enough good swimmers to score in
some of the events, and these
three teams should have their own
existing contest for fourth place."
The Wolverines will be at full
force for the meet, and Stager
will exhibit the potential power
that is expected to repeat the
championship performances of last
year. The "M" coach, however, is
not overconfident.
Trio of NCAA Champs
Looking over the opposition, he
remarked, "Both the Spartans and'
Hoosiers should give us a close
match, and Ohio State's divers,
Sam Hall and Ron O'Brien, will
make that event tight."
Michigan State has three re-
turning national champions to
bolster its squad: Don Patterson
in the 100-yd. freestyle, Billy
Steuart at the 440-yd. and 1500-
meter freestyle events, and Frank
Modine, title-holder at 100- and
200-yard breastroke.
Indiana also boasts new stars
to strengthen its team in Frank
McKinney, AAU backstroke king;
Bill Barton, a top butterfly per-
former who has beaten Michigan's
Tony Tashnick and Cy Hopkins;
and sprinter John Parke.
Relays' Purpose
Stager, co-originator of the In-
vitational Relays, said the purpose
of the meet is to give competing
swim teams the advantage of hav-
ing one more "big" meet each
season within the Conference
schedule. Other non-Big Ten
schools have been invited to add
competition, he added.
Commenting on tomorrow's meet
against Iowa State, the Wolverine
mentor said, "I'll use this match
to test most of my younger swim-
mers." Michigan is heavily favored.

Fleccia Brothers

1109 South University

-Daily-Peter Anderson
FROM BENCH TO FRONT LINE--Michigan's basketball hopes.
for the coming season have received an unexpected boost from
Lovell Farris (34), previously just another reserve. Farris' spring-
board to the starting lineup came in the recent Motor City
basketball tournament, where this action occurred. Teammate
M. C. Burton (24) looks on as Farris prepares to grab a rebound
from a Princeton player.
Farris Rises from Benebsc
To1 Position on Frrst ITeam
By MIKE GILLMAN
Rogers in the Ohio State gami
"Lovell Farris, who's he?" this Saturday.
Before the Christmas vacation, Commenting on the recent per-
Michigan basketball fans could formance of his new find, Perigc
have asked each other this and said, "He had two real fine game.
not too many of them would have at Detroit, but has looked medi-
known the answer. ocre in our last two. This is prob.
Lovell Farris was Just a name ably due to the pressure of Con-
on the roster, a bench warmer that ference play. A little experience
only got into the game in the last should help him a lot."
minutes when the Wolverines
were far behind or ahead. But the Noticeable by his bull-like work
Motor City tournament at Detroit under the boards, Farris ha.
changed all this. earned the nickname "Crash'
He got his big chance when given to him by last year's team-
Gordie Rogers missed a pre-tour- mate, Billy Wright. To some ob-
nament practice. Having looked servers this calls to mind the pla3
sharp in the last drill before the of farmer Wolverine eager Ran
opener with Princeton, Farris got Kramer. And, in fact, the resem-
the nod from Coach Bill Perigo as blance is even physical.
the fifth starter. While it is doubtful that he will
The soft-spoken junior, who ever match the records of Kramer,
hadn't started a. game since his few Michigan fans will have oc-
had't tared gae sncehiscasion to ask each other, "Whod
high school days in Cleveland he?" whe as take the flo
(where he gained all-state laur-hs"whnFarriakest oor
els), came through with two tre- thiswinter.
mendous performances. Against
Princeton in the opener, he con- CANADIENS STI
tributed 12 points to the Wolver-
ine victory.
And in the finale he poured in liI
19 for the best evening of his CnI ag
career as Michigan walloped the
University of Detroit, 93-68, for
the tourney championship.
Makes Honor Team By TOM WITECKI
He looked so impressive in this Two victories over the weekend
two-game stint that he was voted boosted the surprising Chicagc
to the all-tournament first team Black Hawks' winning streak tc
along with his teammates, George six games and moved them intc
Lee and M. C. Burton, and even second place in the National Hock-
received one vote as the most ey League standings, 12 points
valuable player. behind front-running Montreal.
While he has not looked as im- However, the Hawks' second
pressive in the last two outings place tenure may be a short one
against Purdue and Northwestern, since they entered* last night's
Perigo indicates that he will con- game against New York a scant
tinue to alternate Farris with two points ahead of the Rangers.

By HAL APPLEBAUM
"Are all these players stu-
dents?"
When informed they were, Ana-
toli Tarasov, coach of the Rus-
sian National hockey team, ex-
claimed,. "Then they are worthy
of more praise than I have al-
ready given them."
Speaking to inquisitive news-
men, players, and coaches in the
Michigan locker room after his
team had won a 7-3 decision at
Detroit Tuesday night, Tarasov
went on to say, "In Russia we
have no student teams which can
compare tothis one.
"They are truly fine hockey
players and if they had more time
to practice they would become
much better."
W hen asked about the evening's
game he said, "We play better
against the American style of play
than against the Canadian style.
Tonight we played against a Ca-
nadian-style team and they gave
us much trouble."
Roughest Yet
"It was the roughest game we
have played in this country so
far. The Canadian style is the
roughest game played and tonight
we played against Canadian boys
who have learned their lessons
well.
Unlike many American coaches,
Trasov was unwilling just to an-
swer questions, shooting back
many queries himself to the at-
tentive audience.
He was especially interested in
what the Americans thought were
his team's weaknesses. He hearti-
ly concurred when the players and
coaches said the Soviets' greatest
dificulties are in clearing the
puck out of their own defensive
zone - especially when poke-
checked - and failing to take ad-
vantage of fast-break opportuni-
ties.
Set Up Plays
Time after time, with a one or
two man advantage, they would
I-M Results
Social Fraternity "A" Basketball
Sigma Chi 69, Tau Kappa Epsilon 13
Alpha Tau Omega 42, Lambda Chi
Alpha 38
Sigma Phi Epsilon 50, Zeta Psi 10
SigmaEAlpha Epsilon 52, Delta Kap-
pa Epsilon 25
Alpha Epsilon Pi 37, Phi Epsilon
Pi 32
Tau Delta Phi 40, Sigma Phi 21
Sigma Alpha Mu 22, Zeta Beta Tau
21
Theta X1 32, Phi Gamma Delta 2
Psi Upsilon 29, Phi Sigma Delta 2
Alpha Delta Phi 36, Trigon 19
Kappa sigma 31, P1 Lambda Phi 25
Phi Kappa Psi 46, Acacia 28
Phi Delta Theta 40, Delta Chi 19
Sigma Nu 41, Phi Sigma Kappa 33
Chi Psi 41, Phi Kappa Tau 12
Beta Theta Pi 41, Alpha Sigma Phi
12
Delta Sigma Phi 37, Theta Chi 19
Kappa Alpha Psi 49, Phi Kappa Sig-.
ma 37
Delta Upsilon 2, Triangle 0 (forfeit)
Chi Phi 0, Delta Tau Delta 0 (double
forfeit)

Ss.
k
Ls
x,

slow up play to let their team-
mates catch up and then set up
the well-patterned plays which
are their forte.
"Do you think it is worth four
dollars to see us play?" he asked
the writers. He again agreed with
them when they answered that
this particular game was worth
that much, but that on the av-
erage National Hockey League
games are more exciting, and fans
would rather pay four dollars to
see Gordie Howe or Maurice Ri-
chard than amateurs.
Tarasov and the Russian team
manager originally came into thej
home team's dressing room to
congratulate the players and pre-
sent Russian team pins to Michi-
gan Coach Al Renfrew and MSU
mentor Amo Bessone.
Congratulate White
After praising the team for their
fine play and sportsmanship, they
shook hands with each player and
\mmmmxmN'ommNXXZ t

congratulated Bob White, whom
they first met when the husky
center was a member of the Capa-
dian Olympic team in 1956.
They then wilingly posed before
the anxious photographers and
calmly answered the stream of
never-ending questions posed to
them.
'M' Goalies Stand Out
Renfrew said, "I think ,we
played a pretty good game. Take
away their four power-play goals
and we held them even. Our de-
fense was very good. They worked
hard and did a really fine Job.
Ross Childs was excellent in the
nets in the first period, Joe Se-
linger didn't have a chance in the
second and Jim Coyle played well
in the last period."
Michigan State participants El-
don Miller, Ed Pollesel, Dick Ham-
ilton, Fred De Vuono, Joe Palano,
and Bill MacKenzie distinguished
themselves.

-Daily-Peter Andersox
HOCKEY CZAR-Russian hockey coach Anatoli Tarasov looks
somewhat distressed as he listens to a question posed by an
American sportswriter after Tuesday night's game against a
combined Michigan-MSU team. 'M' defenseman Barrie Hayton
(upper right) attentively waits for his answer.

LL DOMINATE:
o Rises to Second in NHL

d
0
0
O
Is
d
e
s
t

SPORT SHORTS:
USC Stays on Probation

In a tight race, Detroit and
Boston are hot on the heels of both
these clubs and f even last-place
Toronto-a mere nine points be-
hind-is within striking distance
of second position.
Castoffs Star
A big factor in the Chicago club's
rise has been the play of its cast-
offs-players received from other
NHL clubs.
Saturday night former Maple
Leafs Eric Nesterenko and Earl
Balfour scored a goal apiece to
lead the Hawks to a 2-1 victory
over their former teammates from
Toronto.
Sunday it was another former
Maple Leaf, Tod Sloan, who trig-
gered the key goal in the Hawks'.
5-3 win over Boston. Ex-Detroit
great Ted Lindsay, who has been
on a recent scoring spree, scored
two goals to aid the Chicago win.
Montreal's Canadiens, who seem
to be in another hockey league,
picked up a 5-1 win over New York'
and a 2-2 tie with Detroit in the
weekend's action to further boost
NHL STANDINGS
(Not including last night's games)
W L T Pts. GF GA
Montreal 22 9 7 51 141 79
Chicago 15 14 9 39 105 117
New York 14 15 9 37 105 109
Detroit 16 17 4 36 88 99
Boston 15 20 5 35 110 124
Toronto 11 18 8 30 83 104 1

their lead over the distant con-
tenders.
Defeat JiMa Team
The New York romp was par-
ticularly sweet for the Canadiens,
since the Rangers have been some-
what of a Jinx club for them this
year, handing them four of their
nine defeats, including the one
that ended their 13-game un-
beaten streak.

Collegiate Wrestling Rules
Differ Vastly from 'Pros'
e

The tie continued Montreal's
domination of the Red Wings, who
have yet to win a game out of the
eight the two clubs have played.
Boston, which has faded to fifth,
did some player shuffing yesterday
in an effort to break out of its
slump. Sold to Toronto was Larry
Regan, to New York Earl Reibel,
and to Chicago Norm Johnson.

By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI -The powerful
NCAA Council last night slapped
another two-year probationary
period on the University of South-
ern California,
The probationary period, com-
ing just as a previous penalty
could have been lifted, was based
on charges USC had offered air
transportation to two student ath-
letes - now in school - beyond
that permitted by the NCAA codes.
USC will not be permitted to
enter athletes or teams in any
NCAA championship events or

of 28 cooperating events for the
first year; it will not be permitted
to participate in any television
programs under control of the
NCAA for the full two years; and
any further violation of rules dur-
ing the period will be cause of
a recommendation for expulsion
from the NCAA.
Pearson Honored
BOSTON - Little Albie Pear-
son of the Washington Senators
yesterday was named American
League 1958 Rookie of the Year
by an overwhelming margin.

By IRWIN BOROF
A far cry from the shenanigans
of the professional wrestling which
appears on television every week,
the college mat sport has its own
set of rules, which promote the
sportsmanship and competition
common in all college sports.
A college meet, such as tomor-
row's Michigan-Indiana contest
here, is decided on the results of
the eight individual matches.
Team scoring is determined by
whether a match results in a fall,
a decision, or a draw.
Five points are awarded a team
for a fall and three for a decision.
In a dual meet the two teams split
four points in case of a draw.
Classified by Weight
Wrestlers are classified for their
matches according to the eight
weight divisions, which range from
123 pounds to heavyweight (over
177 pounds).

scoring system provides for pc
in offensive and defensive
neuvers. This point system is
tirely independent of team s
ing and is used only to detern
the winner of a match by d
sion.
The scoring system gives
points for a take-down, one
an escape and two for a man
reverses the advantage.
One or two points for "rk
time" are awarded a man who
the advantage of his opponent
one or more minutes durin
match. One or three points
awarded a wrestler who ne
pins his opponent's shoulders
the mat. The number of pc
awarded is determined by the
eree.
Two Minor Changes
The rules are the same as
year except for two minor chan
A wrestler who is "stalling"

ANN ARBOR CIVI C THEATRE, INC.
presents
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S
......... ..- ..-..... . .-.. ... .. .. . . r .r . ..

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