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January 07, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE

TUT ICNUKf AN UnATIV

SDAY, JAS

yIUARY 7 ,,1989 1lu. ~ S llwl t~

omen's Housing Improves with Age

Althoygh many of today's Uni-
versty coeds may be confined
within dormitory walls, the early
history of the housing of women
students reveals a lack of super-
vised living quarters.
The history of housing for wo-
men begins properly in 1870, the
year in which women students
first entered the University. These
thirty-four women, who had over-
come the prejudice of the Regents,
now had to contend with a bigoted
faculty, student body and town
citizenry.
This prejudiced attitude mani-
fested itself in many ways, but in
none more painful a manner than
in the reluctance of Ann Arbor's
rooming house owners to take in
women for room and board. Land-
lords reportedly regarded women
students with scorn and accepted
them only when male students
were not available as roomers,
Had Poor Conditions
The result in the first years of
their attendance was that women
had notoriously poor living con-
ditions and very little recognition
in the social life of the town.
The problem was somewhat re-
solved by the creation of sororities
and' the prevalence of "mixed"
rooming houses, but no effort was
made by the University to estab-
lish separate houses for girls.
'The resident of a modern resi-
dence hall would find these living
conditions just short of barbaric.
No sitting rooms were provided for
the reception of callers, bedrooms
were sparsely furnished and the
bathroom facilities inadequate.
Change Made
No radical change took place
until the fall of 1904, when a
united movement among the girls
to secure rooming places with re-
ception rooms was begun. This re-
sulted in the creation of "league"
houses, the first of which was
opened the same year.
In these houses, rooms were
rented only to women, and parlor
privileges were included in the
rental - a big step forward in
women's living.
The first dormitories as such
came on campus several years
later, Helen Newberry Residence
being the first in the summer of
1915. Martha Cook Building iol-
lowed in September of the same
year,
Buys Alumnae House
With the organization of the
Alumnae Council, the Detroit
branch announced In 1917 that it
would buy and remodel a house
for women, Alumnae House. In
1944, at the request of the Alum-
nae Council, Alumnae House had
been renamed in honor of Mary
Butler Markley, one of the first
women to graduate from the Uni-
versity.
Markley House was closed in
1950, however, because the house
was rin poor condition and too
small to be operated efficiently,
a far cry from the building that
now bears Mary Markley's name.
While league houses were un-
i-Hop Plans
Competition
In Dancing
A free dance contest at 11 p
Saturday in the League snack b
will be sponsored by the -Hoop
committee in preparation for the
annual dance to be held the week-
end of second semester registra-
tion:
Winners of free style, jitterburg,
and cha-cha dances will receive
free tickets to the J-Hop dance,
which will be held from 9:30 p.m.-
2 am. Feb. 7 in the I-M Building.

"Out of this World,," this year's
dance theme, will feature the
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra under
the direction of Warren Coving-
ton.
Covington, who plays trombone
as Dorsey did, has starred in
many of America's top dance
bands and in his own radio show.
He follows the style of Dorsey,
playing such songs as "I'm Get-
ting Sentimental Over You,"
"Marie" and "Song of India."
~The annual "Junior Hop" be-
gan in 1877 as a big social event
featuring an orchestra of two vio-
lins and a piano which played for
the 20 couples who attended the
dance. The Hop was sponsored by
a group of fraternities during the
fifth year of its existence on cam-
pus, and the name was changed
to the 'Society Hop."
"Junior Social" in 1883 was
sponsored by that class, but dur-
ing the next decade it was given
by the juniors in some years and
the fraternity men in others.
Tickets for this year's J-Hop are
on sale from 1-4:30 p.m. weekdays
until Jan. 16, in the Administra-
tion Building.

BETWEEN SEMESTERS:
Rendezvous Offers Pause
For Discussion, Recreation
"Sick, Sick, Sick?"
The subject for this year's Win- thinking in Christianity, Judaism,
ter Rendezvous, a three-day re- the "Beat Generation." popular
treat between semesters at win- religion and existentialism sees as
terized Cedar Lake Camp, will be the meaning in it all."
contemporary man's situation and "With our flexible schedule,"
some of the current responses to
it. Duerksen continued, "there will
Sponsored by the Office of Re- be blocks of time when students
ligious Affairs, the Rendezvous will be free to use any of the re-
offers a "withdrawal" from Jan. sources we provide -- a library,
27 to 30 for three days of relaxed craft and drawing materials, a
discussion, mental stimulation, frozen lake and people with whom
and recreation, according to Har- to discuss their pet ideas. There
old Duerksen, program director. will also be workshops on jazz and
"Once we have defined the folk singing."
dilemma faced by contemporary Winter Rendezvous is open to
man," he explained, "we will look any interested student, although
critically at what the most recent the group will be limited to 40.

hr 'I'S

Our Annual
JANUARY

Be a step ahead
in warm, waterproof, winter boots
MARKED DOWN
for campus comfort at bargain prices.

-Daily-Allan winder
FIRST HOUSE-Helen Newberry Residence, built in the summer of 1915, was the first women's
dormitory on campus. Before this, women students at the University endured semi-barbaric living
conditions in the few rooming houses which would accept women roomers. The creation of league
houses in 1904 eased the situation, but the building of Helen Newberry Residence was a significant
step in the history of women students at the University.

CLEARANCE CONTINUES
of FALL and WINTER STOCK
* DRESSES
* JACKETS
* COATS
* BLOUSES
* WESKITS
*SUIT S
* HANDBAGS'
* SWEATERS
*HATS
SCARFS
* JEWELRY
* SKIRTS
It's Your Chance To Save Up To 50%Q

I

dergoing a period of Alternate
growth and recession, the dormi-
tory system was gaining impetus.
Betsy Barbour House was opened
in 1920, and Adelia Cheever, a
co-operative enterprise, the next
year.
Facilities Taxed
In spite of the additional hous-
ing provided by the new dormi-
tories, housing facilities of Ann
Arbor were taxed to the utmost. As
a result the Regents, in 1928,
authorized the building of a dor-
mitory to house 440 girls.
The prospect of such a large
dormitory, however, caused a
great deal of controversy between
the landladies of Ann Arbor and
the University. The landladies
feared that their rooms would be
left empty and their means of
livelihood thus endangered.
The proposed dormitory was
also criticized as being too large
and its site "too far away from
campus."

listing more league houses and
renting fraternity houses. -With
the end of the war and the return
of several thousand veterans,
however, the situation became in-
creasingly difficult.
A new building and purchasing
movement resulted in the pur-
chase of Mary Barton Henderson
House in 1945, the construction of
Alice Crocker Lloyd Hall by 1949,
League Holds
I n terv iews
Petitioning and interviewing for
positions on the central commit-
tee for Frosh Weekend is in prog-
ress at the League, according to
Mary Kay Office, '61, of the Inter-
viewing and Nominating Commit-
tee.

and the addition of Geddes House
in 1953.
September, 1950, marked the
inauguration of a policy to house
all freshman women in the Uni-
versity system rather than to par-
cel out latecomers to league hou'ses
or rooms. This policy, however,
produced enormous difficulties,
and resulted in reconverted rooms
to accommodate the increase.
Several more extensions in room
availability were necessary, these
being met by the acquisition of
Victor Vaughan House and Fletch-
er Hall for the use of women stu-
dents in 1951 and 1954, respective-
ly.
Couzens Hall was obtained from
the hospital administration in
1954.
Add New Houses
To the delight of men students,
Tyler and Prescott Houses in East
Quadrangle became women's resi-
dences in 1952 and Frederick
House in the West Quadrangle
joined the group in 1953-54.
With the opening of Mary
Markley Hall this fall, the wo-
men's residence halls system has
reached a new height in accom-
modations and facilities, Mark-
ley's modern rooms being a far
cry from the dingy hovels that the
early alumnae occupied.

ON FOREST
off corner S. University
opposite Campus Theatre

Petitions must

Need Felt day and a half p
The desperate need for housing view. Appointm
prevailed, and the construction of views should bex
Mosher-Jordan, the first large ly as interviewin
women's dormitory at the Univer- Any girl who v
sity, was completed in 1930-31. tension on her1
* The first attempt to establish to call, either M
a correlated program for residence 3-9365 or Marci
halls arose during the depression. 2-5618.
When, in 1933, it became neces-
sary to lower room and board
rates because of financial pressure
on students, it was difficult for
Mosher-Jordan Hall, w i t h o u t
some assistance, to meet its large
annual payments.
As a result, it was united with LONG
all of the other University dormi- DISTANCE
tories, except the privately en-M G
dowed Martha Cook Building, to
save in general overhead expense.
Shortage Increases
By 1935 the housing shortage
for women had increased to the
point where the dormitories were
seriously overcrowded. The con-
struction of Madelon Louisa
Stockwell Hall, completed in 1940, Phone C l4ect
helped to ease the situation, but Flint CEdar 4-i
the advent of the war brought a Fnter
new housing shortage. UInterstate Rotes
During World War II the Uni- W
versity augmented its facilities by

be turned in a
rior to the inter-
ents for inter-
made immediate-
ng ends Monday.
would like an ex-
petition is asked
iss Office at NO
a Wafter at NO

/&nP/,A

CAMPUS TOGS
W 111 S. University
near E. University
STORE HOURS 9:30 to 5:30 ALL WEEKDAYS
Read and Use Michigan Dachy Classifieds

s'

HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
1273 Broadway
Flint 6, Michigan Bill
Stevens
686Manage
Free Estimates Lit. '40
Every Friday
perate, schedule and dispatch our awn fleet of vans
for better direct service without transfer.

STARTING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, AT 8:30 A.M.

ONE
WEEK
ONLY

ONE

.WEEK
ONLY,

We Must Reduce Our.Stock!i

I1

ONE GROUP 97c a Bushel (Buy them b y the Bushel)

I

i

RIDICULOUSLY LOW PRICES

SHOE SALE

9c 19c 39c:69c 97c up

WOMEN'S STYLES ONLY

Selected styles from our regular stocks including some
British Brevitts Penaljos-Sandler Sportsters and
Cobblers.

THE MOST FABULOUS SALE
IN OUR STORE, HISTORY

GROUP A
$1 95
GROUP B
$777
GROUP C

A black calf cuban heel pump by Brevitt and a few
pairs of black or tan low heel pumps. A half-dozen
pairs of the shearling lined outdoor snow-boots. Val-
ues to $17.95.
A varied selection of Penalios in both the slip-on or
tie variety - scattering sizes in Haymakers and a few
pumps by California Cobblers with the inch and a
quarter wedge. Values to $12.95.
Finally a group of Sandler flats and oxfords in both
suede or smooth mclf in orev, ton or Hork.ls A n Cfl

Many of these titles are out of print and in limited editions.
HUNDREDS OF SETS AT A VERY LOW PRICE

HUNDREDS OF
CHILDREN'S BOOKS
INCLUDED

ALL SALES FINAL
NO LAY-AWAY
CASH!

0 0

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I

11

IL

A" an.

III

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