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December 14, 1958 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-12-14

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[4, 19s THE MICHIGAN DAILY

leligion Remains Domi ant in French Christmas

By JUDITH HITZIG
Though convivial Christmas spirit
eists throughout the wurld, it is
particularly prevalent in France.,
a predominantly Catlooic country.
This is paiticularly "visible in
the customs of the people.' said
Michel Enamcu. a native of Paris
presently tehi nch t
U,-oversity, He cexpl'ained thah
f sti e spi Tit apprtwovweeks
preceding rChrstmas when ech
.icurch will have Its own display
of the Nativity scene or "Creche"-

which, he added. "replaces the
customary Christmas tree." These
flyes or statues that compose
the Creche are moulded out of
ar~:stic colored clay and are called
sarton."
'The climax of all this prepara-
tion is the midnight Mass," Bena-
nou enost everyone at-
tend curh, ee toe h
aren't devout. Benamou claims
that the greatest celebration is
held at Notre - Dame Cathedral
vwhere everyone, including those
vwho pursue no religious activity
go to hear this magnificient spec-
tacle-
Observe Custom
Midnight Mass in France is
followed by the custom of reverie.
"This custom." Benamou said, "is
observed even more than Mass it-
self." Reverie entails a tremendous
banquet or "reveillon" which is
comparable to our Thanksgiving
feast.
The reveillon consists of a huge
dinner comprising wine and goose
stuffed with chestnuts, which
comprise a major portion, and
many other delicacies especiallyj
reserved for this festive and joyous
occasion. In many homes the re-
veillon is a family dinner at mid-
night, continuing late into the
morning.
In Paris the usual family din-I
ner at home turns into an expen-
sive evening of dining out in one
of Paris' more luxurious restau-
rants. "This is a huge meal for a
huge occasion," Benamou said,
adding this is '"an evening of
dancing and drinking" which lasts
far into the wee hours of morning
for everyone concerned.
Customs Vary
Benamou stated that customs
vary from province to province in
France, but differ especially in

southern France where the prop
employ an alto;wher d:f ur
ritual. Here the amo Shc >
Act, a depiction of the
scene, is enacted by real shp
who come down to Les au i
real lambs to present the Adora-
tion of the Lamb, This cumtonm
prevais throughoute suhcrn and
"Christmas in France is more
of a children's celebration than an
adult's," Benamou said. Just as
American children believe in Satna

C:s. the French have their
:.valent in Le Pere de Noel.
hey, too. prepare large lists for
S nta. comprised of all the toys
they hope to receite, but instead4
ed hanging up stockings, the
French place their wooden shoes
in front of the chimney.
The factories play a big part

the children's enjoyment.

wishes for a happy holiday season.

... FEATURING . . .
THE LARGEST SELECTION of P PIPES IN MICHIGAN
BARLING- DUNHILL -COMOY
Everything in Smoking AccessoriesY
POUCHES - RACKS - HUMIDORS - LIGHTERS
IMPORTED and DOMESTIC TOBACCOS and CIGARS
ALWAYS HUMIDOR FRESH
PIPE INEt
1209-A South University NO 3-6236
g p-.}:'

in contributing to the Christmas Benamou explained that the
spirit. At this time. the factory sending of Christmas cards is a
administration holds a special new innovation in France, just
ceremony for their employee's recently imported from England
children, This ceremony is called and America. The usual custom
the "gouter,' a 4 p.m. feast which was to send out a simple calling
consists of refreshments, distribu- card with just the name engraved
tion of toys, and a sin. all for and a simple phrase expressing

GAGE LINEN SHOP
iS the lgiclcii7f ~G~r
Bath Towel sets 340- 3.S5-5 00-6.25
Matching fingertips 40c -3c 65c - c each
Scarfs, silk or wool, square or long
Handkerchiefs for men'ond women
A wide selection of Christmas designs in table cloths,
tea towels with matching aprons, cocktail napkins
and handkerchiefs, aprons of all descriptio's and
prices.
Place Mats - Straw, plastic, match stick and Looper
--35c, 50c, 75c 1.00 and up. .
Tablecloths, place mat sets, bridge and luncheon sets
F Linen toaster and Mixmaster covrs- A
Hot roll covers, guest towels, sheet sets, pillow cases
Bathroom rugs, Lidcovers, shower curtains are just
a few of our many gift items,
Coi in u. hil ourl' c/ions arc at /hcir bes/
and hcerc Quali/y has ino sub/titutc.
GAGE L-INEN SHO
Open 9:00 to 5:30 Monday thru Saturday
11 NICKELS ARCADE

IVORY STATUE
* . Sainte Chapelle of Paris

VIRGIN AND C iLD
- -. detail of altar piece

PEACE ON EARTH:
Commercialism Keeps
Christmas SpiritAlive

By RALPH LAN(GER
Commercialism has been berated
and denounced for its deleterious
effect on the Christmas spirit,.
However, according to a recent
report from the National "Keep
the Cashregister in Christmas"
Council, commercialism is ac-
tually responsible for keeping thea
Christmas season alive.
Visions of sugar plums, tan-
gerines, candy canes, and other
goodies have been replaced by
visions of model nuclear power;
plants, Vanguard rocket kits, and
full size reproductions of the
Mackinac Bridge in the heads of
those snuggling in their beds on
Christmas Eve.
Kid sused to get a half dozen
tang'fnes as a special treat but
now tangerines have become com-
monplace and kids get their vita-
nins every day instead of just
during December and January.
Stan Freberg has a new recordI
out which pokes fun at commei-

cialism. One verse, perverted from
"The Twelve Days of Christmas,"
says, "On the fifth day of Christ-
mas my true love gave to me, five
tubeless tires" - obviously a de-
monstration of the practicality
which business has succeeded in
instilling in the 'American char-
acter.
Still another beneficial effect
of commercialism is in the field of
mental health. Scrooge no longer
need be neurotically obsessed with
money. It's all automatic. He has
the products, people buy them and
Scrooge can smile and be merry
and wealthy.
And, in days of economic down-
swing, the Christmas hypodermic
gives that well known disease
"sales deficiency anemia" (some
call it "tired unemployment) a
killing dose and sends the gross
national consumption curve soar-
ing.
Peace on Earth and Good
Shopping.

1

GOOD TASTE
PREVAILS
in Roblee
Cordosheen

ii
CIHf R"fS]1FMAS TRIE
S5*
1. Swiss-Lanella and English Viyella. Smooth as silk, warm as
toast andguaranteed washable - inauthentic tartan
plaids and solid colors. fromn 13.95
$t
2. All silk and 52 inches long - hand made - ancient madder
ties in neat foulard patterns. 3.50
3. The world's best two-ply Scottish cashmeres, fashioned for
us by Braemer, Mac George, Ballantyne - cardigans and
crew neck.
4. The duck brush. Imported from England, this one stands
12", is actually a pure bristle clothes brush. 6.50
5. Ancient madder silk vest made especially for us by Welch,
Margetson and Co. Ltd. of London. 25.00
Wool challis and other styles from 11.50.
6. Designed for expansive hosts and toasts. This luxurious metal
tankard is encased in solid leather. Removable lining is treated
against moisture damage. 12.50
fi .: x.7. Our own exclusive crew neck shetland sweater. Hand-knit-
ted for us by Robertson of Scotland and six-foot scarf to
match SWEATER 13.50
3. SCARF 6.95 7
$. Argyles in unusual color combinations, knitted for us by Cox,
Moore and Allen Solly of England. from 3.50
J&
>1Liameli 4E I:LV0the

I

THE SHOE WITH THE OPEN-COLLAR FEELING

a

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