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December 13, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-12-13

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"U'H'F . MTCHT AN DATLY

SATURD.

i1 f L A ~ VI ~ ~f }1'dA fl~ i4a'TLY SAUR
a. s ss s_. h .. _...._..Sr -

...

PROF. FISHER'S ANALYSIS:
USSR Uses Komsomol To Indoctrinate. Youth

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4f?

sented yesterday under the aus- sive its membership was to be and the league, consisted of the evolu-
pices of the committee on the pro- thus did not know whether or not tion of elections. he explained.
gram of Russian studies and the include the word "Communist" in During the first two congresses,
history department before approx- its title. the number of nominees for cen-j
imately 150 faculty members and Although league membership tral committees of those respec-
students. was not limited strictly to Com- tive years were greater than the'
"The Communist party of the munist youth. a cognate of three number of positions to be filled.
Soviet Union has always faced a Russian words meaning Commu- In 1920 the element of choice
difficult problem with the Soviet nist League ("Komsomol") was was eliminated. Only one member
youth - how to inculcate dis- adopted. was nominated to fill each vacan-
cipline in a program which will, Granted Recognition cy.
at the same time, foster initia- At the eighth congress of the At that time the party was still
tive," Prof. Fisher said. Somehow, Russian government, the Kom- not the monolith that Stalin was
the party had to organize a pro- somol was granted official recog- destined to build later - one
gram which would appeal to and, nition. The congress of Russia which described him as the "son
at the same time, command the agreed to permit a maximum of people's destiny, the happiness
young people, he explained. amount of spontaneous activity of the Soviet people . ,. the Lenin
In March, 1917, the provisional for the youth group. of today."
Soviet government came into be- But just one month later, it "The Komsomol of 1920 was still
ing. Youth groups flourished and was suggested that the party in- many years away from its Stalin-
the Bolsheviks extended influence crease its control over the Kom- ist phase and it was to require
over them. somol, Prof. Fisher continued. In many purges and changes to ef-
In August, 1917, a resolution for August. 1919, all agencies from fect this transition," Prof. Fisher
establishing a mass proletariat or- the central committee to the lo- concluded.
ganization really under the control cal organization of the Komsomol

I

Allot Feunds
For Grants
To Research
The Regents yesterday approved
budgets totalling $1,298,485 which
had been started since the last
meeting.
Research grants and contracts
accounted for practically all of
the money allotted. This totalled
$1.298.,765 with the remaining $720
going in an instructional program
category.
Of the sum the federal govern-
nent provided $1,099,742; indus-
try and individuals provided the
remainder.
Foundations gave $78,858, while
state and local governments ac-
counted for $10,000, and $2,031
was in endowment income.
The largest contract was one of
$340,000 for a classified project
at the Willow Run Laboratories.
Another contract was approved
for $200,750 is to be used by the
Office of Naval Research for the
measurement and analysis of the
radio waves that are emitted by
the sun and the galaxy,
Also for the use of the Willow
Run Laboratories, $140,000 was
given to be used under the direc-
tion of J. A. Boyd.
1

4

PROF. RALPH T. FISHER
speaks here

F "

of the youth was passed by the were subordinated to the central
party. The youth were to create a committee and local organizations
"self-standing" organization spir- of the party.
itually linked to the party. To Train Members
Group Founded By 1920, the party had a three-
One year after the revolution, point concept of the Komsomol's
the Komsomol was founded, Prof. role: to train future members of
Fisher continued. At the first con- the party, to help and to speak for
gress were 194 representatives of Soviet youth, Prof. Fisher said.
120 different youth groups con- "Non-Komsomol groups were
taining 22,000 members. Of these potential competitors," he said.
representatives one-half were The party's fear of possible rivals
Communist party members, less to the league even extended be-
than one-fourth were party sym- yond such groups as a Congress of
pathizers, and a little more than Jewish students and the Boy
one-fourth were unaffiliated, Scouts, each of which was subse-
Prof. Fisher revealed. quently dispersed, to youth groups
"A hot dispute broke out over under Komsomol sponsorship.
the name," he said. The league "Democratic centralism," or the
could not determine how inclu- party's principles for behavior in
Where will YOU live
Next Semester?
in Co-ops you get:
ECONOMICAL LIVING: Costs approximately $15.00 per
week for room and board.
ADULT RESPONSIBILITY AND BENEFITS: You must
work if you live in a Co-op, but you work for yourself
in a house which you own and run.
DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES: No racial, religious or poli-
tical discrimination. Applications or additional infor-
mation ,at
THE INTERCO-OPERATIVE COUNCIL
2546 SAB
Office hours: 10-12, 2-5 daily; 10-12 Saturday

Grant Leaves of Absence,
Approve Appointments

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ri

The Regents acted on several
faculty appointments and leaves
of absence at their meeting yes-
terday.
Prof. Jack R. Britton ofthe Uni-
versity of Colorado was named
visiting professor of mathematics
for the second semester.
Prof. Marion C. Siney of West-
ern Reserve University was ap-
pointed associate professor of his-
tory also for the second semester.
Prof. Britton was born in St.
Petersburg, Russia and came to
the United States while still
young. In 1925 he received a
Bachelor of Arts degree from the
University of Colorado. Then he
continued his study at the Urii-
versity of Colorado where he re-
ceived a Doctor of Philosophy in
1936, the same year he became a
naturalized citizen. He taught at
the University of Colorado, and
became a full professor in 1949.
Prof. Britton was here as a visit-
ing professor in 1948-1949.
Prof. Siney was born in Mus-
kegon. She received a Bachelor of
Arts degree in 1933, Master of Arts
in 1934 and the Doctor of Philo-
sophy degree in 1938 from the
University. Then she began teach-
ing at Western Reserve Univer-
sity. In 1954 she was promoted to
an associate professorship.
Th Regents approved the re-
quest of Prof. Otto G. Graf of the
German department that a sab-
batical leave be cancelled for the
second semester of 1958-59.
He said that the serious illness
of his mother made it impossible
for him to continue with his plans
to study abroad.
The sick leave that was given to
Irving Kao, a catalog librarian,
was extended to include the period
up to June 30, 1959.
The Regents also approved a
sick -leave that will continue to
the end of the first semester for
Prof. E. H. Gault, of the School of
Business Administration.
Prof. Douglas A. Hayes, also of
the School of Business Adminis-
tration, was given a leave, with-
out salary, for the second semester
of 1958-59.
He will conduct a research proj-
ect sponsored by the Life Insur-
ance Association of America which
will deal with the problems and
policies involved in valuing securi-
ties..
MiMiss E. Ruth Hedeman, a re-
search assistant in the McMath-
Hulbert Observatory, was granted
leave without salary, for a period
of three months because of ill-
ness of her parents.
A leave, without salary, was
granted for Prof. Arnold S. Kauf-
man, of the philosophy depart-
ment, for the first semester of
N1958-59 and also the first semester
Iof 1959-60.
He will use the period in re-
search at his own expense on ana-
lytical conception of freedom and
related problems.
Dr. Kenneth P. Mathews, asso-
ciate professor of internal medi-
cine, was given leave from Jan. 15
to April 15, to permit him to study

research methods in the Immuno-
chemistry Laboratory at Walter
Reed Army Institute of Research
in Washington.
The Regents approved leave,
without salary, from Feb. 1 to June
30, 1959, so that he may accept a
position as head of the Opera-
tions Research Department at
Willow Run Laboratories.1
Prof. John Weimer, of the Eng-
lish Department, was granted sick
leave for Nov. 17, 1958, to Jan. 31,
1959.
Dr. George Zavitzianos, asso-
ciate professor of psychiatry, in
the Medical School, was granted
leave, without salary, for Jan. 29,
1959 to Jan. 28, 1960.
He plans to investigate ego psy-
chology at the New York Psycho-
analytical Institute and the Lon-
don Psychoanalytic Institute.
Accept Award
In Journalism
The University Regents accepted
a gift to establish the Guy H.
Jenkins Memorial Journalism
Awards at the monthly meeting
yesterday.
The gift of $3,000 was given to
the University by Mrs. Jenkins.
Jenkins had been Lansing cor-
respondent for the Booth News-
papers. He had requested that
instead of sending flowers to his
funeral that his friends make con-
tributions for the establishment of
a scholarship at the University.
The award will be given to de-
serving students whoare planning
to make a career in the newspaper
field. ,

DIAL NO 2-3136
ENDING TONIGHT
LATE SHOW
11I P.M.

Starting Sunday
MARTIN & LEWIS
in
"AT WAR WIT H
T HE ARMY"
PLUS -
"Hit The Deck"

C

".

NEXT WEEK
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday-8 P.M.
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH and SCHOOL OF MUSIC
present
MOZART'S COMIC OPERA
"COSI FAN TUTTE"
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM-FRIEZE BUILDING
Box office open Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
December 15, 16, 17
12-8 P.M. $1.50, $1.10, 75c

A
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING TODAY
Continuous Today fron 1 P.M.
d ra
0I IRT16111 I4cX I, I
MASSEY- CARSON -LORRE
DirctMd by FRANK CAPRA
PRISC LLA LANE + EDW. EVERETHORION
JAMES GLEASONI . JOSEPHINE NULLI
JEAN ADAIR - JOHN ALEXANDER
WAiwR ft oC
-SUNDAY -
"A MAN ESCAPED"

DIAL NO 2-2513
ENDING TODAY
man, wa
and child TogE
Ig this
---
MY rol
Wow vI th /

'

Mw- irw~
c-AND-tc eRt~n i

1

iorkei

A CUI-E

-- Starting Sunday -
TV's tAFF.FAMID
FUNSTERS

I

RMIAHYE R P1F t4@M W
PLUS
"CORONATION OF
POPE JOHN XXIII

I'

Bridue Sunlises

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