100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 06, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OrWW VMT~lffIGANfDAILY TUA,- - -*--.----

SATURDAY,

lIIL iRiLai{}nl' alra aaJa

!ate Tennessee Spurt Beats Michigan Five,

80-66

i

Tidwell, Lee Star in Kent Tourney Loss;
Wyoming Defeats Kent in Finale, 75-67

UNITAS CLOSE TO RECORD:
Rams Host Colts in Anticlimactic Game

T

By FRED KATZ
Special to the Daily
KENT, O. - Lack of depth and
height took its toll for Michigan
last night as the Wolverines
dropped an 80-66 clash to Ten-
nessee in the opening game of the
first annual Midwest Invitational
basketball touranment.
Michigan meets host Kent State
at 7:30 p.m. today in the conso-
lation game of the four-team two-
day tourney. Wyoming, 75-67 win-
ner over Kent plays Tennessee at
9 p.m. for the championship.
The Wolverines, fighting to re-
gain the lead they had during
most of the first half, went ahead
on the Vols, 59-58 on a George
Lee jump shot with 6:50 remain-
ing in the game. Seconds later
M. C. Burton added one more
point with a free throw.
However, the roof quickly fell
in upon the tired and out-
rebounded Maize and Blue. Ten-
nessee connected on four consecu-
tive field goals within the next
two minutes to make it 66-60.
The Wolverines had one more
flurry left in them and that soon
proved to be a false alarm. Baskets
by John Tidwell and Terry Miller,

and free throws by Burton and
Lee, narrowed the count to 70-66
with two minutes left.
But that was all the scoring
Michigan was to accomplish for
the rest of the night. The Wol-
verine defense, especially porous
during the second half, couldn't
keep up with the revived team
from the Volunteer State, as it
rolled up its final point total to
80.
Tidwell and Lee, two 6'4" Wol-
verines, with as dissimilar types
of shots found anywhere, com-
bined for 47 points. Tidwell once
again paced Michigan in the scor-
ing column, this time with 24
points - two more than he hit
last Monday against Pittsburgh.
Relying upon a soft jump shot,
the poised and steady sophomore
tallied 17 points in the first half
to give Michigan a 34-33 lead.
Lee practically reversed Tid-
well's scoring performance, pick-
ing up the second half slack with
17 points of his own. Playing one
of the better games of his three-
year college career, Lee repeated-
ly riddled the Tennessee center-
land with bull-like rushes as well
as occasional outside shots.

But it was another 17 point in-
dividual spree that brought about
Michigan's eventual demise.
Six-foot eight-inch Gene Tor-
mohlen poured in that manyI
points, most of them coming early,
in the second half, that enabled
Tennessee to stay within reach
of Michigan, before pulling out in
front to stay. He finished with 22?
points.
The height furnished by Tor-
mohlen and 6'6" Dalen Showalter
simply wore down the smoother-
working Michigan club.
The taller Southeastern Con-
ferdnce team won the battle of the
boards through the ever present
lengthy arms of Tormohlen. He
hauled down more than one-half,
of his team's 64 rebounds.
Coach Bill Perigo was rather
disappointed in the defensive
work turned in by his charges.
Michigan will face a fast,
youthful Kent outfit - headed by
Oliver Wallace, Chuck Boykin and
Jim Maddox. The sophomore trio
scored 43 of the Golden Flashes'
67-point total.
The Wolverines are being
housed at the Aurora Inn Motel,
20 miles outside Kent,

By At SINAI
The newly crowned champion of
the Westerr Division of the Na-
tional Football League. Baltimore,
will journey to the West Coast
today to meet the Los Angeles
Rams, who are tied with Chicago
for second place, in an anticlimax
game.
Baltimore clinched its first mod-
ern sports title last Sunday in a
stirring "come-from-behind' vic-
tory over the San Francisco 49ers,
35-27.
The powerful Colts, trailing 27-7
at the half, rallied for 28 points
in the final two periods as star

in signal calling. He has thrown Rounding out the great Colt
touchdown passes in 23 consecu- backfield have been halfbacks L.
tive games, and if he throws one G. Dupre, Lenny Moore, and bruis-
against the Rams today, he will ing fullback Alan Ameche. Moore
break Cecil Isbell's league record. ran 73 yards for a crucial touch-
_ _ \ down against the 49ers, while
Ameche has taken over second
place in total rushing yardage.
Over the years the best NFL
teams have always had a bruising
fullback to complement their pass-
ing attack. Cleveland had Marion
Motley, and now Jimmy Brown.
Detroit had Pat Harder, and last
year, John Henry Johnson. And
now ,the Colts have Ameche.

4

PISTONS' TOP SCORERS-Detroit Pistons forward George Yard-
ley (left) showed he was somewhat refreshed by his two-day "rest"
by tossing in 24 points against NBA Eastern-Division leader New
York last night. Teammate Gene Shue sank 11 field goals for 22
points, but all in vain as the Knicks edged Detroit, 110-108.
Knicks Gain First-Place Tie

quarterback John Unitas regained
the composure which he appeared
to lose in the first half. HOMETOWN
Strongest in YearsHS C RE
The Colts appear to have the
strongest aggregation of players to
hit the NFL in several years. They Saturdays 9 to 10:30 A.M.
have averaged almost 34 points per With TOM JOHNSTON
game offensively while allowing
only 12.
Unitas has shown uncanny ac- ALAN AMECHE
curacy in passing and brilliance .. . diversifies Colt attack
- - -
AETM JC

4

Statistics

. Michigan
Lee, f
Burton, f
Rogers, c
Tidwell, g
Miller, g
Kingsbury, g
TOTALS
Tennessee
Reeverts, f
Showalter, f
Tormohlen, e
Coulter, g
Risser, g
Scott, g
TOTALS
Halftime: MI
nessee 33.

FG
9
2
2
11
3
0
27
FG
4
7
10
7
4
1
33

FT PF'
5-6 3
3-4 4
1-2 3
2-5 5
1-4 1
0-0 0
12-21 16
xFT PF'
6-7 2
4-4 3
2-9 4
2-3 2
0-1 4
0-0 2
14-24 17

TP
23
7
5
24
7
0
66
TP
14
18
22
16
8
2
80

By Nosing 0
DETROIT (P) - Frank Selvy
sank a 15-foot jump shot with two
seconds left and gave the New
York Knickerbockers a 110-108
victory over the Detroit Pistons
and mvoed the Knicks back into
a first place tie with the Boston
Celtics in the National Basketball
Assn.'s Eastern Division standings
last night.
Selvy, the former Furman All-
American, got his tie-breaking
shot off with a desperation leap
after missing one with 15 seconds
remaining.
In breaking their three-game
losing streak, the Knicks had to
welter Champ;
byBig Margin

ut Pistons

ichigan 34, Ten-

Jordan New
Whips Akins

LACK OF SCORING DEPTHI-Seventy per cent of the Wolverine
basketball team's points last night were scored by two players,
George Lee (left) with 23 and John Tidwell with 24. Tennessee
scored 14 points in the last four minutes to win, 80-66.
SPORT SHORTS:
Minor League Head
Blast~s SundayTV

LOS ANGELES P) -- Under-
rated Don Jordan of Los Angeles
captured the welterweight cham-
pionship of the world last night as
he handed champion Virgil Akins
of St. Louis a bad beating to win
a 15-round decision.
The 24-year-old challenger, a
3-1 underdog going into the ring
at the Olympic Auditorium despitej
his rating as the No. 1 contender,
all but knocked out the 30-year-
old titleholder. He won the unani-
mous verdict by a substantial mar-
gin.
First Defense
This was the first defense of the
crown by Akins since he won clear
claim to it in knocking out Vince
Martinez in St. Louis last June.
After the first few rounds of
the nationally-televised fight it
was apparent that Akins was in
for a rough evening.
Akins was an even-money fa-
vorite to knock out Jordan, some-
thing no other fighter had done

in the . Californian's 55 previous
fights. The 30-year-old Akins was
the one who was hanging on and
all but wrecked in the 10th.
Never in Trouble
As it turned out, Jordan never
was seriously hurt and Akins man-
aged to stay on his feet for the
full 15. An estimated 7,000 fans
cheered the local youngster from
bell to bell.
Referee Lee Grossman scored it
145-138, Judge Mushy Callahan
145-132 and Judge Tommy Hart
146-136. The Associated Press had
it 150-132. Scoring was 10 points
per round-10 to the winner and
!9 or less to the loser.
The champion was continually
booed for butting, which cost him
two points on the referee's card.
But it was Akins who was the
worst hurt. Jordan ripped a bad
gash over the champion's right
,eye in the fifth and had it bat-
tered and swollen almost shut at
the finish.

overcome a 20-point lead, 55-35,
which Detroit had built in the
second quarter. New York, with
Kenny Sears hitting 23 points,
and Willie Naulls 21, narrowed the
Pistons' halftime margin to 58-56
and held on to trail only 82-79 at
the start of the final period..
With Sears, Naulls and Selvy
monopolizing the fourth-quarter
scoring, the Knicks rose to a
seven-point lead as the Pistons hit
a lingering cold spell. But Detroit
managed a 108-108 tie with 25
seconds left when center Phil
Jordon sank a long hook shot.
On the opt-of-bounds play, New
York sent the ball in to Selvy,
who missed a long set shot. But
the Knicks got the rebound and
he tried again successfully,
The victory was the second of
the season for New York over the
Pistons and gave the Knicks a
12-6 mark in the Eastern Division,
the same as the Celtics, Detroit
now stands 10-11, still second in
the Western Division, behind the
St. Louis Hawks.
HIGH SCHOOL CAGE
University High 50, Flat Rock 49
A.A. St. Thomas 57, Wayne St.
Mary 37
COLLEGE SCORES
Clemson 56, Duke 55
Calvin 77, Hillsdale 54
Xavier (O.) 58, N.M. A&M 52
Miami (Fla.) 113, Tampa 71
ladho 59, Colorado St. Univ., 58
Colorado 70, Washington 63
(overtime)
Stanford 55, Santa Clara 49
Drake 83, Omaha 52
COLLEGE HOCKEY
Michigan State 6, North Dakota 0
NBA SCORE
New York 110, Detroit 108

Ot~I

THENi

JSABBT

WASHINGTON (P)-George M.
Trautman, head of the minor
leagues, said today the major
leagues and national television
networks are leading the minors
toward baseball's graveyard.
Trautman denounced plans for
a second network to televise a big
league game every Sunday as "just
another nail in the coffin."
With support from Baseball
Commissioner Ford Frick, Traut-
man long has charged that loss of
gate receipts attributable to free
home television is destroying the
minors.
The majors have replied that
any agreement to restrict televi-
sion coverage would violate federal
antitrust laws,
Only Thursday NBC confirmed
it would inaugurate Sunday big
league game-of-the-week telecasts
this season. Boston, Detroit, Balti-
more and Washington of the
American League and Milwaukee,
Pittsburgh and St. Louis in the
National are signing up for the
Sunday programs.
CBS televised a Sunday game
throughout last season and pre-
sumably plans to repeat next year.
Both networks also carry a Satur-
day game.
The minors have particularly
condemned the Sunday telecasts.
Sunday has traditionally been
their best day for attendance.
DETROIT (AP)-Team Captain
Joe Schmidt yesterday was named
by his teammates as the Detroit
Lions' "most valuable player for
1958."
It was the third time Schimdt,
a 26-year-old linebacker, has been
so chosen. He first received the
award in 1955 and won it again'
last year
IOWA CITY (A)-Iowa football
coach Forest Evashevski is in line
for a sizable increase in his $17,500'
salary, one that might make him

Hayes, who is believed to be
slightly under that figure.
MELBOURNE VP) - Michigan'
alumnus Barry MacKay got past
the third round of the Victorian
tennis championships yesterday1
and faces wily Bob Howe today.
MacKay dropped the first setj
to Wayne Reid, 6-8, but came back
strongly to win the next three,,
6-3, 6-3, 6-0.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Williarrt C. Bennett, Pastor
8':45 and 1 1:OQ A.M. "Christian Perfection"-y.
Dr. Roy Gustafson.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild and Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M. Sermon by William C. Bennett, Pas-
tor.
Wednesday 7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St. ,
10:00 and 11:30 Meeting for worship.
10:00 Sunday school and college discussion.
11:30 Adult discussion.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 Churh School. Adult Discussion Group.
"Understanding the Emotionally Disturbed
Child"-Mr. and Mrs. George D. Nichols.
11:00 Worship Service. Sermon-"Jesus--Then
and Now."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Services: 9:30-10:20 and 11:0012:00. "Words
for You to Live By"-Dr. Fred E. Luchs preach-
ing.
Bible Lecture 10:20-10:40-Mrs. Fred E. Luchs
Church School Sessions: 9:30-10:40 and 10355-
12:00 (crib through ninth grade).
Studer4 Guild: 7:00 P.M. in Mayflower Room. Dr.
Celestine Fernando, "visiting ambassador"
from Ceylon, will discuss "The Unityof Moo;
The Community of the Church."
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenow Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 1030 and 12:00.
10:30 A.M. Seminar, '"Christian Beiefs."
11:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
5:30 P.M. Supper.
6:15 P.M. Worship.
7:00 P.M. "Music and the Church," Marion
Mason Brown speaking.
8:00 P.M. Discussion.
TUESDAY-
9:00 P.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's apart-
ment, 217 S. Observatory.
FRIDAY-
6:00 P.M. Graduate supper.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTE'
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday-9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Service &
Communion.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper. .
7:00 P.M. Program: Prof. John Baldwin,
Speaker.
Wednesday-7:30 P.M. Vespers.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Engiewoodr

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tppan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
SUNDAY, DEC. 7
10#45 A.M. Morning Worship, "Fear Not," Rev.
Fuller preaching.
7:00 P.M. The Student Guild will hear Dr.
Celestine Fernando of Ceylon discuss "The
Unity of Man; The Community of the Church."
Congregational Church.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
ev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and 12:00
noon.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 5.10 P.M.
Weekday Masses: 6,:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00 A.M
Novena Devotions: Wednesdayevenng, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Dolly at 5:10 P.M.
Annual Retreat: Sunday,(Monday, and Tuesday-
Conferences afternoon and evening.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worshipi "Strength For This
Tired World," Merril R. Abbey, speaking,
5:30 P.M. Fellowship supper.
7:00 P.M., Discussion group in Sanctuary: Merril
R. Abbey "Making Our Theology Relevant."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
151) Washtenaw Avenue
(Thed stheran Chrch-Missouri Synod)
AlfredT!. Scheips, Postor
Theo. A. Kriefall, vicar
Sunday at ?:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Testimony
of the Lord is Sure" (Universal- Bible Sun-
day).
Sunddy'at 9:15 and at 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club', Supper and Christmas Program, with
Lutheran students from Flint, Albion, Hills~
dale, and Bowling Green, 0., as guests,
Wednesday t 7:30: Midweek Advent Candlelight
Vesper S rvice, with Holy Communion.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs. Gabriell Bublitz, Assistant Student
Counsellor
Sunday, December 7, 1958
9:45 A.M. Student Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Worship - Dr. Chester H. Loucks,
preaching on: "Gifts for Christ."
6:45 P.M. Guild meeting. Mrs. Joseph Hart-
sook will present a program on "Christmas
Through Art" - a presentation of originals,
prints and slides of Roult's famous'religious
art,
FIRST CHURCH OF CHR)ST,
SCJENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "God The Only Cause and Creator'
is the lesson sermon.
A freereading room is maintained at 39 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Mopday
11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday through
Friday 11:00 A.M: to 5:00 P.M. ,Saturday
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND TH E
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street

KNICKS, LAKERS SURPRISE TEAMS:
Hawks, Celtics Lead NBA Again

By STEVE ROGERS
Familiar names are once again
finding their way to the top of the
National Basketball Association
standings.
The St. Louis Hawks and the
Boston Celtics, last year's Western
and Eastern division champions,
have now forged their way to first
place in their respective leagues.
Despite the fact that Owner Ben
Kerner continues to fire his
coaches with almost clocklike reg-
ularity, the Hawks are neverthe-
less firmly entrenched in first
place, holding a four-and-a-half
game lead over the second place
Detroit Pistons going into last
night's activity.
Pettit Causes Success
The reason for St. Louis' suc-
cess-with little over a quarter of
the season completed the Hawks
have been playing at a .737 clip
with 14 wins in 19 games-can
again be placed on the shoulders
of Bob Pettit.
Pettit, third leading scorer In
the NBA last year, is the spark-
plug in the Hawks' scoring column
and their leading rebounder. Com-
bined with Slater Martin and Cliff

still in contention for the Western
Division title.
Boston is in a much more pre-
carious first-place position than
the Hawks, and the reason for this
is the surprising New York Knick-
erbockers.
Early Leader
In first place throughout the
opening weeks of the season, the
Knicks have been dropped to
second by the surging Celtics. They
trail the Boston club by only half

a game, however, and at the end
of this weekend's play could easily
find themselves reinstated in the
top spot.
The big question being asked
around NBA circles this year is
what has happened to the Knicks.
The New Yorkers have been a last
place club for three straight years
and haven't been too accustomed
to being in the first division.
The answer most people give
lies in new head coach Fuzzy Le-

vane. The mild-mannered coach
has both increased the morale of
his team while giving his players
needed confidence. It is this that
has allowed Ken Sears to come
into his own and take charge of
the team that might not catch
the Celtics this year but should
give them a whale of a scare.
NORCROSS
Boxed
Assortmllents

- ~' ~ xNY;K .

11,

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan