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December 02, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Dirks Claims
Lack Religiou
OKLAHOMA! O.K. Religion is the "poor Cinderella"
ofthe disciplines offered by today's
universities, the Rev. J. Edward
L Dirks, of the Yale Divinity School,
He presented the Protestant
point of view at an appraisal ses-
sion of a National Consultative
} HI
66e Conference on Religion and the
State University which met at the
10University recently.
Sponsored by the Office of Reli-
gious Affairs and the National
Council of Christians and Jews,
the Council climaxed the observ-
ance of 100 years of religious ac-
tivities on the University campus.
Tickets still available forIFaculty, Administration Attend
°eIt was attended by 334 religious
OPENING NIGHT, Thurs., Dec. 4 leaders, university administrators
and faculty members from 44
Matinee, Sat., Dec. +6 states.
1.25The Catholic point of view was
Lydia Mendelssohn Box-Office The "Matchmaker"
(Michigan League) is coming !
14

Universities
is Emphasis
presented by Father Charles V.
Aibright, of the National Newman
Club Foundation, and the Jewish
by Rabbi Harry Kaplan, of the
B'nia B'rith Hillel Foundation at
Ohio University.
"We are involved in a wide
cultural revolution," Rev. Dirks
declared. "There is a sense of
world crisis abroad. We have gone
beyond merely experimental en-
deavors and need to clarify what
we have. The nature and destiny
of man needs to be put into
perspective.
Man 'Somehow Failed'
Rabbi Kaplan reported a feeling
that twentieth century man, with
all his achievements, has somehow

Survey Reveals Women
Feel Jobs Important

Show Modern Art

Over half of America's em-
ployed women say their jobs help'
make them feel useful and im-
portant, with the type of satisfac-
tion they get depending on what
their job involves, according to a
nation-wide study by the Survey
Research Center of the Univer-
sity's Institute for Social Re-'
search.
Findings of the study are de-
tailed in a report on "Social Roles

of American Women: Their Con-
tribution to a Sense of Usefulness
and Importance" by Robert S.
Weiss of the University of Chicago
and Nancy Morse Samelson of the
Merrill-Palmer School.
Their findings pointed out that
seven out of ten women in profes-
sional and managerial occupa-
tions refer to their jobs as a basis
for social worth. Both teachers
and nurses, who comprise most
of the professional women in the
U.S., find their work highly re-
warding.
Women in managerial positions,
the co-authors cited, were more
likely to call attention to their
achievement and the recognition
that comes from advancement in
an organization.
About six in ten clerical and

Cinema Guild,
SBX Manager
Positions Openi

' nilnr7 «fnilcri in fhc. ric}in ty flnr#

iaiieu- "Laueu l1 2oe Uenaeinoa
sensitive areas of the spirit and Petitions for seats on Student

k .... .... .. ... . ..,. ... _... s

# _ _ .,

development of character without Government Council's
which these material triumphs be- Guild Board, Human
come empty shells." Board, Early Registra
According to Father Albright, Committee, and for m
"The conference has helped sharp- the Student Book Exc
en our realization of our need to available today at the S
continually improve the profes- through Dec. 10.
sional competence of our religious SGC Administrative
centers." dent Jo Hardee expl
"At the same time," he con- there are three Cinema
tinued, "we have been occasionally sitions open, four on t
reminded that there is still room Relations Board, and fi
for greater recognition on the part chairmanship) on the
of universities that we are an istration Pass Commi
integral part and perhaps should manager and registra
be accepted as an official part of committee memberships
the university community, even semester, the others for
though geographically we may be The Cinema Guild B(
always on, the periphery of the the student organizatio
university. sor the film programs h

C i n e m a sales workers, the report contin-
Relations ued, said their jobs helped make
ation Pass them feel important. Their satis-
nanager of faction came from feeling valu-
change are able to their employer's organiza-
GC offices tion or because work offered them
a means of supporting themselves
Vice-Presi- or their families.

-Daily-Allan Winder
ART EXHIBIT-Contemporary Latin American art is on display
in the main concourse of West Quadrangle until Dec. 3. The exhibit
consists of some twenty all original works in all media except
sculpture by artists from twelve Latin American countries.

Ained that
Guild po-
he Human
ve (and the
Early Reg-
ttee. SBX
ation pass
s are for a
a year.
oard selects
ins to spon-
held in Ar-

r

PRINCETON PRESIDENT:
Goheen Criticizes Supporters
Of 'Efficient' Educationn Plan

I"

PHOTOGRAPHY
by BudMMor
NO 2-6362
1103 South University

chitecture Auditorium and decides
the amount of money each shall
earn.
The Human Relations Board in-
vestigates alleged cases of dis-
crimination and human relations
conflict in the University and city
as these involve students.
The position of Education and
Student Welfare committee chair-
man is also open for petitioning,
according to Miss Hardee.

Ending
TODAY

R
A
DIAL NO 2-3136

Robert F. Goheen, president of
Princeton University, last week at-
tacked the critics who would solve
the colleges' problems by trying to
"equate educational with indus-
trial efficiency."
" Inhis annual report, Dr. Go-
heen rejected such frequently
made proposals as year-round op-
eration of the colleges, pushing
the student through in three
years, or putting him on a self-
learning basis.
Dr. Goheen also took issue with
some of the current attitudes
within his profession. He strong-
ly opposed the argument advanced
recently by A. Whitney Griswold,
president of Yale University, that
the student be charged more near-
ly the full cost of his education.
Criticizes Myth
He also criticized what he called
a "myth" that college students to-
day do not have the interest in ex-
tra-curricular activities that they
used to have. The American Coun-
cil on Education's Commission on
the College Student reported in
October that today's more mature
students considered most campus
activities adolescent.
Princeton's graduate school, he
said, is now more selective than
its undergraduate college, accept-
ing only 31.5 per cent of those ap-
plying, as against 40 per cent for
the college.
Any expansion in the university,
he declared, should take place in
the graduate school, to meet the
nation's and the colleges' urgent
needs for creative research and
for college teachers.
Gives Interview
In an interview discussing his
report, Dr. Goheen declared that
"panaceas" such as more self-
learning or fuller use of the col-
lege plant offered no solutions to
the problems of higher education.
There is little in the experience
of most high schools or American
homes to indicate that "the Uto-
pian theory" of substituting more

independent study for faculty
guidance will work, he said.
The fact is, he said, that educa-
tion, as distinguished from mere
training, is a "tailor-made, crea-
tive process" that can never be
cheap.d
To Increase Tuition
It is not generally appreciated,
he said, that the parents of
Princeton students pay only 45,
per cent of the instructional costs.
T iitinnnu a !P120IInv0 ri

Art Curator
To Give Talk
George M. A. Hanfmann, Prof.
of fine arts and Curator of Clas-
sical Art at the Fogg Art Museum.
Harvard University, will speak on
"Greek Myths aid Sanctuaries in
the Light of Recent Discoveries:
Aulis, Iolkos, Dodona," at 4:10
p.m., today, in Aud. B, of Angell
Hall.
The second of a series of ar-
chaeological lectures, the address
is under the auspices of the fine
arts and classical studies depart-
ments and the Ann Arbor Society,
Archaeological Institute of Ameri-
ca.

But Dr. Goheen called "ill-I
considered" talk about raising tui-I
tion charges in private institu-
tions to where they would meet
the full cost of education.
No Princeton student is ever
likely to pay nearly that much,
and no student should ever be de-
nied a Princeton education be-
cause of financial need, he de-
clared. He did, however, strongly
endorse long-term financing of
college costs.
Student interest in extra-curri-
cular activities has changed rath-
er than waned, Dr. Goheen em-
phasized.

Lydia, 1958."
INTERESTED IN EARNING
A IUNDRED DOLLARS
PER MONTH?'
See you at the Union
Wednesday, Dec. 3
from 8-8:15 P.M.
Room 3Y

iumon, now at $ ,zu a year, is
to be increased by $250 next year day Prof. Hanfmann initiated the
to finance faculty salary in- series by speaking on "Excava-
castions at Sardis, Capital of Ancient

- I

Hurry-
Lost 2 Days

I' I I Ill N 'di1 U1 I I

Ends
Wednesday

;

W DIAL NO 2-2513
B1G4BooK ! BIG CAST !
BIG PICTURE!&

Starting Wednesday
"THE DECKS RAN RED"

IN PERSON
ODETTA
"One of the most remarkable folksingers of our time."
in a concert of BALLADS, BLUES and FOLK MUSIC
Friday, December 12th 8:30 P.M.
at the ARMORY . . . corner Fifth and Ann Streets
RESERVED $2.75 GEN. ADMISSION $1.65
Tickets at

COLUMBIA PICTURES/
SQUERTRcy.
THEoIRS N.SuA

-

I

THE DISC SHOP
1210 South University
Open Evenings

LIBERTY MUSIC
State Street Branch

A JOHN FORD PRODUCTION
JEFFREY HUNTER" DIANNE FOSTER -PAT O'BRIEN
BASIL RATHBONE-DONALD CRISP-JAMES GLEASON
ADVERT ISEMENT
I ~ arat~fti tas bBARONET

I

mi

I

I

I

Those beauteous, butcherir
belles are now in two sizes

Their expertness in criminol-
ogy will amaze you ..

r

_ !

I ~ ~i = W ~w~aI m '. - 1:_:..I

II

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