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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 26, 1958 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

lit laKt

THF. milcmGAN UATTIV

iig'h lPTUW A M1AIIf'UTl A i Uflb £1

Five Charge

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN.

N Bones
,About It

"U' Chemist
Gets Grant

FIRST-SEMESTER

U.S. Policy
'Unrealistic'

1J.

t .

. ..-...-..,.---

In a recent article in the Mich-
igan Journalist, five University
faculty members agreed that the
U.S. policy concerning Quemoy
and Matsu was not only imprac-
tical and dangerous. but was un-
realistic, and that if the islands
were surrendered, there would be
no great threat of an invasion to
Formosa.
Professor Leland Stowe of the
journalism department comment-
ed that the impracticality of
Chiang's and Dulles' retention
policy was evidenced in the heavy
military expenditure and the loss
of many human lives, in addition
to the decreasing confidence of
our allies and our loss of diplo-
matic prestige.
Predicts China's Status
He predicted that "The U.S.
can't hold China out of the United
Nations for more than three years
anyway," so we should use recog-
nition and a seat in the United
Nations as bargaining tools for a
Communist Chinese promise of
non-aggression now.
Prof. Preston W. Slosson of the
history department, suggested
that "a permanent cease-fire ne-
gotiated by the United Nations
would be a good solution because
it would free us from being the
only ones involved. The islands
should be left to the native in-
habitants." The Communist Chi-
nese may just be trying to pres-
sure us into a diplomatic recog-
nition and a United Nations seat,
he added.
U.S. in Corner
Hugh T. Patrick of the econ-
omics department, asserts that
"The U. S. let itself get backed
into a corner over the islands,"
and that we should reconsider the
hypothetical control Chiang has
over the government of China and
what his chances are for retriev-
ing it.
Prof. Robert E. Ward of the
political science department also
commepted that we have no legal
argument to back up our position
in this situation and that "if a
major war with Russia developed,
our allies would reluctantly join,
but it wouldn't be their free
choice."
Have Valid Claim
Finally, L. A. Peter Gosling of
the geography department assert-
ed that the Chinese Communists
have a valid claim if they demand
that the.Nationalist-held offshore
islands Amoy and Foochow, which
block off two of the important
ports of the mainland, be opened
to sea commerce.
"Even if the Communists get
the islands without making any
promises, they may continue to
threaten an attack against For-
mosa to keep up an internal state
of tension," he said.

(Continued from Page 4)
seasons he organized, operated and en-
couraged gambling within the student
body for financial gain, by means of,
football parlay cards. One. student
placed on probation for the remainder
of the 1958-59 academic year commenc-
ing with official notification.
2 Conduct unbecoming a student in
that during the 1957 football season
and, to a much lesser degree, during
the 1958 football season he organized,
operated and encouraged gambling
within the student body for financial
gain, by means of football parlay cards.
One student placed on probation for
therremainder of the 1958-59 academic
Fyear, commencing with official noti-
fication.
S3) Conduct unbecoming a student in
that he participated in gambling op-
erations within the student body by
distributing football parlay cards. One
student placedon probation commenc-
ing with the date of official notifica-
tion and lasting until the beginning of
spring vacation of the 1958-59 academic
year.
4) Conduct unbecoming a student in
that he organized, operated and en-
couraged gambling within the student
body for financial gain, by means of
football parlay cards. One student
placed on probation for one full year
from the date of official notification.
5) Conduct unbecoming a student in
that he operated and encouraged
gambling within the student body for
financial gain, by means of football
parlay cards. One student placed on
probation for the remainder of the
1958-59 academic year commencing
from the date of official notification.
Lectures
Lecture, auspices of the Depts. of
Fine Arts and Classical Studies and
the Ann Arbor Society, Archaeological
Institute of America. "Excavations at
Sardis, Capital of Ancient Lydia, 1958."
In color. George M. A. Hanfmann, Prof.
of Fine Arts and Curator of Classical
Art, Fogg Art Muse mn, Harvard Univ.
8:00 p.m., Mon., Dec. 1, Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
Lecture, auspices of the Depts, of
Fine Arts and Classical Studies. "Greek
Myths and Sanctuaries in the Light of
Recent Discoveries: Aulls, Iolkos Do-
dona." In color. George M. F. Hanf-
mann, Prof. of Fine Arts and Curator
of Classical Art, Fogg Art Museum, Har-
vard Univ., 410 p.m., Aud. B, Angell
Hall.
The Science Research Club: The De-
cember meeting will be held in the
Ra kham Amphitheatre, 7:30 p.m.,
Tues., 'Dec..2. Program: "ventricular
Fibrillation." Henry H. Swain - Phar-
macology and .Evolution of Sound
Communication in Insects." Richard
D. Alexander - Zoology. Introduction
of new mbers. Dues for 1958-59 ac-
cepted after 7:10 p.m. Meeting not
open to the public.
Academic Notices
Botanical Seminar: Dr. A. H. Smith,1
Dept. of Botany, will speak on "Rela- ,
tionships of the Agaricales to the Se-
cotiaceae of the Gastromycetes," Wed.,
Nov. 26, 4:15 p.uI, 1139 Nat. Sci. Re-
freshments will be served at 4:00.
School of Music Honors Scholar Pro-
gram: Deadline date for receipt of ap-
plications for the Honors Scholar pro-
gram, together with supporting recom-
mendations, is Dec. 1. Explanatory leaf-
lets and appropriate forms are available
in the School of Music office.
Zoology 1, lecture section III (Shap-
irio). The motion picture "Inside the
Cell" will be shown loon., Dec. 1, 7:30
p.m., 1300 Chem. Bldg.
Alfred P. Sloan Fellowships: Seniors
who are planning to teach high school
science or mathematics are eligible to
apply for $2,500 Sloan Fellowships for
a full year of graduate study, 1959-60,
at the University. Programs in science
or mathematics only will be approved.
Those interested should call at the
main desk in the lobby of the Rackham
Bldg. for full information.
Doctoral Examination for Robert
Eugene Robinson, Chem.; thesis: "Vi-
brational Assignments of Trifluoracet-
Ic Acid and Some of Its Derivatives,"
Wed., Nov. 26, 2308 Chem. Bldg., 1:00
p.m. Chairman, R. C. Taylor.
Placement Notices
Personnel Requests:
Management Consulting Firm in New
York. Accountants. 1) Cost Accountant
with experience in the design and in-

stalation of standard cost systems and Notice to Feb. and June Graduates: Those who enjoy the routine of F or-
variable budgets. 2 )Punch Card and Inorder to apply to the National stuffing large boats into small
Data Processing Specialists Fwith ability tfi.-lrebot no n l
and experience to design new methods Security Agency, all applicants must bottles can now try something new
and applications for machine process- fill out their application form. The -srbertE
ia n machine accounting. 3 Gener- only examination to he given this \-tkngrn the boneseoteriof r rO ep
al Accountants, preferably PCA's with wiool year will Je given on Dec 6 l98 thout marringr the exterioreof istrydepl
industrial accounting experience c . and applications must be submitted by -
pa ossstem s.No.a29, 1958- Qualifications ar-e fort 'ifice ra os andge SPeter Sieczkiewit a Rhode Is grant for
4)Ofc ehd n rcdrsSe angu~ag;e majors - knowledge of Saic, land bthrde t n i ;t
caists experienced in the streamlini Middle Eastern and Far Eastern lan- bhesuZsngn h
of clerical operations to reduce costs. heizin
5) IndusySpecilits -Banks ad guages; language minors-backgrounds ented the idea.
Rairoas.in Economiics, English, Governmnent, Under his kitchen-knife and Th 'r
Railroads) with general industry ex- mstory, InternationalhRelations, PsU-dkthe Resea
perience and some accounting or sys- chology and Sociology with a strong finger system everything comes
tems background. Travel assignments language minor; non-language liberal out, the wing bone, shoulder bone.'j leges and1
range up to 40 per cent of the working arts - two groups, those which involve breast and rib bones, thigh, back and abroa
the use of electronic data ha hiatna nd leg bones, even the wish bone. versity, B
weekends, equipmnent and those which do not lend nd leg 1Be
_Management Consulting Firm in themselves to machine operation - any The carcass is inside out when research

Study

E. Ireland of the chem-
artment has been given
rick Gardner Cottrell
work on the total syn-
of abietic acid.
nt is one of 46 given by
arch Corporation to col-
universities in 24 states,
ad to the American Uni-
eirut, Lebanon, for basic
in the natural scienes.

Cleveland, Ohio, 1) Plant :Manager-
It would be advantageous for the in-
dividual to have had management ex-
perience in fabrication of products like
electrical household appliances.. 2)
Chief Engineer - experience in the de-
sign of processing machinery and in
automation is a must.
State of Michigan, Lansing, Mich.
Applications for all of the following
Spositions must be postmarked no later
than Dec. 10, 1958: 1) Account Clerk B.
One year of clerical experience andE
graduation from high school. 2) Ac-
count Clerk A. Three years of clerical
experience, two years of which shall
have been in account clerk work, and
graduation from high school. 3) Geolo-
gist Trainee L Graduation from college
with major course of study in geology,
or geological, petroleum or mining en-
gineering. 4) Fish Habitat Biologist
Trainee I. B.S. with major course of
study in zoology, wildlife management,
or aquatic or fisheries biology, or in a
field of biological science with a minor
in one of these courses. 5) Game Biolo-
gist Trainee I. Graduation from college
with major in game biology, zoology
or wildlife management, or in an allied
subject with a minor in one of the
courses named. 6) Fish Area Biologist
Trainee I. B. S. degree with major in
,zoology or aquatic or fisheries biology,
or in a field of biological science with
a minor in one of these courses. 7) Fish-
eries Biologist Trainee I. B.S. degree
with major in zoology, or aquatic or
fisheries biology, or in a field of bio-
logical science with a minor in one of
these courses. 8) Forester Trainee I.
Graduation from an accredited college
with a degree in forestry. 9) Land Ap-
praiser Trainee I. B.S. in forestry, game
biology, agriculture, land and water
conservation or an allied conservation
field. Further information on any of
these positions can be obtained by con-
tacting the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Admin. Bldg., or calling the Uni-
versity, Ext. 3371.
Central Soya Co., Inc., Port Wayne,
Ind., Press Relations Executive. College
degree in journalism, agriculture, com-
munications, or closely related fields
is essential. Experience in newspaper,
trade publication, press or public re-
lations work is desirable. Age: between
25 and 40.
Chamber of Commerce of Fort
Wayne, Ind. Staff Executive. Would in-
volve someone capable of carrying on
a broad civic-improvement program
where contacts would be made with
the very top-level of business people
and local governmental officials. Pre-
fer a young man whose future is ahead
of him.

degree in liberal arts; mathematicians
-statistics, modern algebra, and infor-
mation theory; Physicists - theoreticalt
and experimental. Mathematicians and
Physicists do not have to take this pro-
fessional examination. Applications are
available in our office.

he's through with it, and has to The nion-profit foundation was
be reversed before further manip- established in 1912 by Cottrell, the
ulations. late Prof. of the chemistry depart-
How does he do it? He refuses ment of the University of Cali-
to tell. There's no law against it. fornia.

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACI'HAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOI OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
JANUARY 19 TO JANUARY 29, 1959
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule m, the
- special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict. the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

Ensian Price Rise of 9%
December 15th
Buy Yours Now-While Only

$ 00
Ii6

Time of Class *

MONDAY

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8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3

Time of Examination
Wednesday, January 21
Saturday, January 24
Tuesday, January 27
Monday, January 19
Tuesday, January 20
Tuesday, January 20 t
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Friday, January 23
Monday, January 26
Wednesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 20
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 29
Thursday, January 22
Wednesday, January 28

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5

TUESDAY

*Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at the
preceding hour.
SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

I

I

Accounting 100, 101, 200, 201
Finance 210
Ind. Relations 100, 200
Marketing 210
Marketing 211
Statistics 100, 200

Wednesday, January 28
Monday, January 19
Monday, January 19
Monday, January 19
Wednesday, January 21
Wednesday, January 21

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

See Russia
for yourself!
MAUPINT06t Moforcoach Tours.

YO
YEA RBO

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Aero. 135
Ch.-Met. 1, Lec A, B, and D
C. E. 22
C. E. 52
Drawing 1
Drawing 2, 21
E. E. 5
E. M.12
EM. 2
English 11
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
401

Monday, January 26
Friday, January 23
Wednesday, January 21
Monday, January 26
Monday, January 19
Saturday, January 24
Monday, January 19,
Monday, January 26
Friday, January 23
Wednesday, January 21

2-5
2-5.
2-5
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departing New York
Aug. 12th. Rate inc.
Economy air fare is
$1,154.00

UR ENSIAN IS AN "ALL-AMERICAN'

OK. ORDER YOURS TODAY FROM YOUR

Friday, January 23

7-10 P.m.

LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

Contact
David Stewart at
NO 3-3883

JJeekend

Botany 2
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 15, 182
Economics 71, 72, 173
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 153
English 23, 24
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31, 32,
61, 62

Monday, January 19
Wednesday, January 28
Wednesday, January 28
Thursday, January 22
Wednesday, January 21

2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5

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Saturday, January 24 2-5

Wonderland
AT LOW
STUDENT
RATES
.. awaits you at any of th
HILTON-STATLER
HOTELS'
NEW YORK CITY:
The Statler Hilton
The Savoy Hillon
The Waldorf-Astori a
The Plaza
WASHINGTON, D. C.:
Th'e Statler Hilton
BUFFALO:
The Statler Hilton

Geology 11 Monday, January 19 2-5
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35 Tuesday, January 27 2-5
Latin 21 Saturday, January 24 2-5
Physics 53 Monday, January 36 2-5
Psychology 190 Wednesday, January 21 2-5
Russian 1, 2, 31 Saturday, January 24 2-5
Sociology 1, 60 Friday, January 23 2-5
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32 Tuesday, January 27 2-5
Naval Science 101,'201, 301,
401 Friday, January 23 7-10 p.m.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See instructions posted outside Room 441 W. E. between Decem-
ber 10 and 20.
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BOSTON:
The Statler Hilton
HARTFORD:

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V- A 7 WWI 'Aw.

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