100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 25, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TiE MICHMGAN DAIY TUSDA

Freshman, Soph
lead Gymnasts

TID WELL HIGH '1' SCORER:
Varsity Tops Frosh, 89-54

By GARY GUSSIN
A freshman and a sophomore
sparkled, but the upperclassmen
offered little to cheer about in the
gymnastic teams intra-squad
meet, held last night in the Intra-
mural sports building.'
The sophomore. Richard Mon-I
petit, took four first places and
two seconds in the six events in
which he competed to outshine
the team's veteran performers in
overall performance.
And while even M o n p e t i t
showed a lack of proficiency on
the side-horse, freshman Bill
Galer turned in a fine perform-
ance to defeat Monpetit and Al
Stall.
Loken Dissatisfied
Coach Newt Loken, indicating
general dissatisfaction with his
team's performance, scheduled a
repeat performance for tonight at
8 o'clock.I
As was the case last season, the
trampolinists showed the best
strength in any individual event
with co-captain and two-time Big
Ten trampoline champion, Ed
Cole, winning with a score of 93.6
points.
Dick Kimball was runner-up
with 91.1 points, and sophomore
Ron Munn finished third with
88.5.
Monpetit's victories came on
the high bar, parallel bars, still
rings and long horse. His sec-
onds were in the free exercise and
side-horse events.
Nino Marion turned in his best
performance of the 'night in the
free exercise with 90:2 points. But

his routine on still rings, the event{
in which he was NCAA runner-up
last year, was only good for a
third place, and though he took
two more thirds and a second, his
performance was generally below
his usual high standards.
Kimball beat out teammate Bill
Skinner in tumbling, with Co-
captain Jim Hayslett finishing a
close third in the only event in
which he competed.
Dozauer Second
Wolfgang Dozauer took three
thirds and two seconds, and his
overall point-total of 487 was sec-
ond only to Monpetit's high for
the night of 520.4.f
Marion was a close third in the
all-events with a total of 475.7 for
the six events in which he com-
peted.
. Loken expressed his pleasure
with the performance of Monpetit,
but said the team was "weak in
spots" and that what was needed WINT
was "more practice in routines" left, g
rather than in individual stunts, up sho
PRO LEADERS WIN AGAIN:
j E r '1 Ifu

-Dally-Peter Anderson
ER SPORTS BEGIN with inter-squad contests in gymnastics and basketball. Richard Monpetit,
oes through a routine on the side horse; Varsity guard Rich Miller, right, goes in for a lay
t as freshmen Jon Hall (28) and Dick Clark (30) defend,
Statistics

By FRED KATgre
A sharp ball-handling fresh-
man basketball squad gave Michi-
gan's varsity a good battle for the
first ten minutes last night at
Yost Fieldhouse before bowing to
experience, 89-5 4.
It was the Wolverines' annual
tune - up against the plebes in
preparation for the season opener
against a stiff Pittsburgh next
Monday.
And from present indicationsi
Michigan looks to be in for a
rough evening against All America
Don Hennon and company,
The varsity was sluggish a great
portion of the -game and couldn't
seem to get started until the con-
test was well underway. Coach
Bill Perigo theorized that his play-
ers might have been sufferingI
from a two-day weekend layoff.
Blow Lead
Michigan blew an early 10-3
lead mainly through the efforts
of 6'0" freshman guard Dickl
Clark. Clark hit on three straightl
jump shots, and another bucket
by Steve Schoenherr knotted the
score at 14-14.
From then on, however, it was
strictly no contest.
The varsity opened up a 28-18
lead in just three minutes with
sophomore John Tidwell hitting
for eight during that spree. The
Wolverines coasted to 40-23 half-
time advantage that was widened
at will during the second half.
Tidwell, only underclassman on
the starting five, paced all scorers
with 20 points and showed that his
fine shooting will be a definite
assets to the Wolverine attack.
Tidwell Praised
"John quite naturally had the
jitters early in the game, but came
through very well," said Perigo.
Following close behind in the
varsity scoring were holdover regu-
lars from last year, George Lee,
M. C. Burton and Terry Miller.
They had 18, 17 and 15 points
respectively.
The varsity ended with a re-

spectable 42 per cent from the' double figures for the first-year
field but showed noticeable weak- men, Clark getting 15 and Maentz
nesses in rebounding and ball- coming through with 14.
handling against a small, fast "Both those fellows have good
freshman team. shots and are fine competitors,"
"If the freshmen had a good big said Perigo.
man they would be really great," Maentz, a name that is familiar
said Perigo. to Michigan students, is the cousin
Perigo had special praise for of All America football end Tom
Clark and 6'2" Scott Maentz. They Maentz who played for the Wol-
were the only ones to hit for verines from 1954-56.
C anadian iSocce"r S quad' 72 -
Outass oCC

I

The Wolverine Soccer Club
fought gallantly Sunday on Wines
Field but were unable to overcome
the University of Toronto as it
annexed-"a 2-0 win.
Toronto. boasting a long list of
championships in the Quebec-
Ontario Intercollegiate league was
held scoreless in the first half as
the Wolverines completely domin-
ated play deep in the Canadians
territory. Time and again the
Wolverines threatened to score but
were thwarted by a skein of bad,
luck. Twice the ball bounced off
the goal-posts back onto the play-
pa-ng field.
Outstanding individual stars
like Rubins Filizola and Erol Ok-
tar amazed the Canadians and the

throng gathered along the side-
lines with their ball handling wiz-
ardry.
However, the complexion of the
game changed in the second half
as the Toronto team used superior
teamwork to break through the
tired Wolverine defense and tally
twice.
Later commenting upon the
game, the championship Canadian
team members said the Wolver-
ines "were the best opponents
we faced all year."
A great deal of the Wolverine
club's success in compiling a 5-1
record should be given to their
spirited captain and organizer
Mitch Oprea.

n

T W-N& *.0 0 4-

colts, Browns Iear Division Crowns

By CHUCK KOZOLL
Heading into the final weeks of
the pro football season, front run-
ners, Baltimore and Cleveland
further isolated themselves in first
place by snaring NFL wins Sun-
day.
John Unitas came back to Bal-

GRID SELECTIONS
'Winner of the final grid picks contest is Steve Smythe of West
Quad/who led all contestants with a 14-6 record. Upsets and ties
once again confounded selectors, who were harassed thusly all year.
The year-long staff contest was won by Chuck Kozoll, Daily
Sports Night Editor, who picked 108 of 180 games correctly. He led
Si Coleman, Daily Associate Sports Editor, by three games. They were
followed by Dick Mintz, Al Jones, Daily Sports Editor, Jim Benagh,
Fred Katz, Dave Lyon and the Guest Staff in that order.
We would like to thank Mr. Jerry Hoag, of the Butterfield
Theater chain for his cooperation, and all of the contestants who
made this contest a success.

timore and the Colts celebrated
by walking over the Los Angeles
Rams, 34-7. The mild rout pushed
the Colts two games away from
second place Chicago Bears.
Cleveland, which appears the
likeliest team to battle the Colts
for the NFL crown, edged closer
to its division title by rubbing out
the Philadelphia Eagles, 28-14.
Bobby Mitchell's two dramatic
kickoff returns of 98 and 69 yards
shocked the Eagles into early sub-
mission.
In Contention
New York, not the same flashy.
team that upset the Browns and
Colts, stayed in contention mathe-
matically by shutting out the
Washington Redskins, 30-0.
In a game marked by a weird
assortment of fumbles, intercep-
tions, and recalled touchdowns;
the New Yorkers won by having
less miscues than the ill-fated
Redskins, 'who rest squArely in

RESERVES GfVE SUPPORT:
Smith, Poulos Star in OSU Game,

fourth place in the Eastern Divi-
sion.
The Chicago Bears carved their
name in the Western Division sec-
ond place position by outsmarting
the Detroit Lions with a timely
aerial attack. Zeke Bratkowski to
Bill McCol twice in the third
period was the story of Chicago
scoring.
Detroit in Fourth
Detroit, resting uneasily in
fourth place in the Western half,
will be aiming to improve their
status on Thursday. The annual
Thanksgiving Day classic with the
limp Green Bay Packers provides
a good chance for the Lions to
move into a third place tie with
the San Francisco 49ers.
The hot and cold 49ers made
their move Sunday by turning
back the last place Green Bay
Packers, 33-12. Y. A. Tittle, the
wise Indian from the West, flipped
three touchdown passes in the
fourth quarter and pushed the
Packers one step lower in the pro
standings.
Pittsburgh, the surprise team of
the Eastern Division, slipped past
the. Chicago Cardinals, 27-20.
Cage Stars
Clown'U''Here
The fabulous Harlem Globe-
trotters ,rand Wilt Chamberlain
will make their only appearance
of the year in Ann Arbor tonight.
The Globetrotters and their en-
tourage will appear at 8:00 p.m. in
the Ann Arbor High School Gym-
nasium.'
Tickets for the game will be on
sale at the Michigan Untion from
4 to 8 p.m. today as well as at
Ann Arbor High School, Moe's
Sport Shop and Raymond Shop.

VARSITY
Lee, f
Farns, f
Burton, f
Donley, f
Rogers, e
Miller, T., g -
Robbins, g
Tidwell, g
Miller, R.,g
TOTALS
FRESHMEN
Higgs, f
Robison, f
Sangster, f
Maentz, f
Hall, f
Brown, c
Clark, g
Schoenherr, g
Newcombe, g
TOTALS

FG
7
2
7
1
2
7
1
8
3
38
FG
0
1
0
7
3
2
5
1
0
19

FT
4
0
3
0
0
1
0
4
1
13
FT
0
2
3
0
3
3
5
0
0
16

PF
4
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
0
14
PF
2
3
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
11

TP
18
4
1"7
2
4
15
2
20
7
89
TP
0
4
3
14
9
7
15
2
0
54

LP's .. $1.98 and
FO LLETT'S
Record Department,
State Street at North University

- - --

0Tuesday, Dec. 2
0*********************

,.

p

11 1

By JIM BENAGH
For a couple of guys who playedg
less than five minutes each beforep
last Saturday's game,, GerryE
Smith and Paul Poulos madea
quite a name for themselves0
against Ohio State.
Injuries forced the Michigan
coaching staff to dip into its third-
team line to get help from thisd
pair of "red-shirts" but before thet
game was over the staff and fanst
alike were beaming over two newg
"finds."r
I-M Sports1
Volleyballn
RESIDENCE HALLr)
Gomberg 6. Lloyd 0 (forfeit)
Van Tyne 6, Greene 0
Scott 5, Taylor I"
Wenley 5, Strauss 1t
Hayden 6, Cooley 09
Michigan 5, Huber I
Reeves 4, Wlnehell 3t
Social Fraternity
Phi Kappa Psi 4, Phi Epsilon P1 1

Smith, a center, entered the
game in the second quarter after
pivotmen Jim Dickey and Dick
Syring were sidelined by injuries
and he became the "opportunist"
of the day.
The short, 180-lb. ex-fullback
intercepted the pass which got
Michigan moving on its final
drive (which later failed on the
two-yd. line). Earlier in the quar-
ter, the Detroit junior had1
grabbed a Bob White fumble. The
recovery halted an Ohio drive on
the Michigan 17-yd. line.-
Smith teamed with Poulos, a
190-1b. guard, to trap All America
nominee White behind the line of
scrimmage for his first loss of the
year.
Poulos made his initial per-
formance in the game late in the
third periodbut wasted no time
getting in the action.
Ohio was ahead, 20-14, at the
time and had control of the foot-
ball. But hustling Poulos, from
Pittsburgh's coal-mining area, did
a one-man wrecking job - tackl-
ing the Buckeye backs three
straight times.
Before the game was over,
press-box observers had Poulos
credited with 12 tackles, includ-
ing his assists. Line Coach Jack
Blott rated his blocking "terrific."
Poulos is a junior in eligibility.
He rejected offers from Army,
Ohio State, Northwestern, North
Carolina, Dartmouth, and several
other schools to come here.
NBA SCORE
Boston 123, Minneapolis 104

Letter Winners
VARSITY
John Batsakes, Jerry Bushong,
Reid Bushong, Jim Byers, Alex
Callahan, Don Deskins, Jim Dick-
ey, Mike Fillichio, George Genyk;
Jim Gray, Al Groce, John Hal-
stead, 'D a r r e 1 Harper, John
Herrnstein, Willard Hildebrand,
Tom Jobson, Bob Johnson, Walt
Johnson, Fred Julian, Gary Kane,
Bill MacPhee, Jerry Marciniak,
Gary McNitt, Brad Myers, Harry
Newman, Stan Noskin, Doug Opp-
man, Paul Poulos, Gary Prahst,
Bob Ptacek, Gene Sisinyak, Gerald
Smith, Willie Smith, John Spidel,
Maynard Stetten, Bill Stine, Dick
Syring, Jim Sytek, John Walker,
John Zachary.
RESERVE
Joe Brefeld, Keith Cowan, Hugh
Crossland, Guy Curtis, Tom De-
Massa, Mike Dupay, Dennis Fitz-
gerald, John Galarneault, Lee
Hall, Don Hannah, Tom Kerr, Don
Kolcheff, Dave Lawrence, Art
Lazik, Jerry Leith, Wes Maki, Jim
McPherson, Gordon Morrow, Fred
Olm, Dave Palomaki, Paul Raeder,
Bill' Reed, Dan Snow, John Soder-
man, Hank Stuart, D a r r e 1
Thorpe, Dwight Tousignant, Dave
Turk, John Vavroch, Grant Walls,
Willie Wilson.

....*........... i+##......s......... *.....
THE, GARRETT CORPORATION
AiResearch Divisions
will be oin campus to Interviw
ENGINEERiNG STUDENTS

Independent
Wesleyans 6, Sempervian 0
Evans Scholars 6, Pill Pushers
Rabble Roisers 4, Cooley Elders
Latvians 6, Psi Kids 0
Owen Co-op 5, Actuaries Y

Don't be
an Onion Head
When you sqy Princeton
Hair Cut you will not
be bald at
715 N. University

00
"
M
#
#
#
1i
#
"
S
"
U
U
U
U
U
U
S
U
S
#
"
#
"
#
#
#
#
#
#
M
S
to

The Garrett Corporation is one of the most
diverse research, engineering and manu-
facturing organizations in the aircraft,
missile and technological fields.
From AiResearch laboratories have
come pioneer developments in aircraft and
missile components and systems. Today
90% of the free world's aircraft use
AiResearch equipment.
Garrett divisions and subsidiaries are
creating a variety of products, including

"BuSsw M.S.-Ph.D. candidates *'* *

industrial turbochargers and marine equip-
ment, and are supplying sales and service
to airframe comnanies, -airlines and the
military.
Project work is conducted by snali
groups in which individual effort is more
quickly recognized and opportunities for
learning and advancement are enhanced.
With company financial assistance, you
can continue your education at fine neigh-
boring universities.

0
2

" TYPICAL PROJECT ACTIVITIES

Handball
Residence Hall
Kelsey 2, Lloyd 0
Social Fraternity
Zeta Beta Tan 3, Kappa Sigma 0
Professional Fraternity
Alpha Chi sigma 2, Alpha Kappa
Kappa 0

11

""""""""""

. ~

r

"""""

Electronic air data computers, pressure ratio trans.
ducer instruments, electrical systems and motors and
generators.
Prelitninary design from analytical and theoreti-
cal considerations for high-level technical work in
aerodynamics, stress analysis, thermodyfiamics,.heat
transfer, cryogenics, pneumatics, nuclear power and
mathematics.
Auxiliary power units and control systems for

various types of missiles.
Air and vapor cycle refrigeratioun turbines,
hydraulic and mechanically driven pressurization
compressors.
Jet engine and rotating machinery design and
analysis involving combustion, turbomachinery, gas
dynamics, thermodynamics and aerodynamics.
Gas turbine auxiliary pneumatic and electric
power units.

44'44'4444'4'4'444'

w
"
"
w
S
S
..
":
"
"'
0r
"
w
s

.SU on Top
n Grid Poll

By The Associated Press
The Top 10 Teams:
1" Louisiana State (115) (10-) 1,443
2. Auburn (5) (0-0-1) 1,0831
3. Oklahoma (9) (8-1) 1,007
4. Iowa (16) (7-1-1) 982
5. Army( 1) (7-0-i) 941
6. Wisconsin (3) (7-1-1) 736
7. Texas Christian (8-1) 7'.'
9. Ohio State (4) 360
8. Air'Force (1) (3-01) 512
10. Syracuse (1) 318
Second Ten: Purdue, Clemson, Mis-
sssippi, Florida, Vanderbilt, Soth
Carolina, California, Notre Dame,
Pittsburgh, Rutgers.

Happy Thanksgiving,
to you, ALL!1

I

Let our 12 Barbers
groom you for the
Holidoys.

Bravo

. . * THE BOWLER by

s
r
In additiona
month orier
aid you in j
Garrett pr
Thermod
Aerodyn
Missile A
Combust'
Chemica
Mechani
I nstrume
Gas Turb
Stress Vi
U" Prelimini
Engineer
Physics
Vibratio
Gear De

. ORIENTATION PROGRAM .

. JOB OPPORTUNITIES .

The Dascoia Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

- - i I

COMPLETE

to direct assignments, an eight-
rtation program is available to
ob selection. You participate in
oject and laboratory activities

and work with engineers who are outstand-
ing in their fields. Your orientation will
include familiarization with sales and con-
tract administration.

KEEN S/BRITISH
in an English gentleman's wardrobe, no
hat equals the Bowler in importance. Keens British
have retained every authentic detail of the classic
Bowler in their new version... and have added a
subtle hint of a taper for the flattering, more dis-
tinctive look so typical of all Keens British hats.
Imported from Great Britain$

dynamics
namics-
Accessories
S'on Analysis
al Engineering
ical Engineering
ntation
bines
bration
iry Design
ring Analysis
n Engineering
esign

taborat
Cryoger
Pneuma
Mathem
Electricc
Transisti
Instrumi
Electron
Analog
Cycle A
Control
Comput
Space F
Sales Er

ory Engineering Missile APU Analytical Design
nics and Development
tics Magamp Design and Development
iatics Liquid Oxygen
al Engineering Air Turbines
ors Air andt Freon Centrifugal
ent Design Compressors
tics Welding Engineering
"
ue Computers Sensors and Servos 0
nalysts Connecting Networks
Engineering Electronic Flight Data Systems,
-er Programming Controls and Transistor Circuitry
Physics and Ionization Air Conditioning and Heat
ngineering Transfer

FORMAL RENTAL

11

I

I

if

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan