100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 23, 1958 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-23
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


s ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
CHICKEN-IN-THE-BASKET
...to take out .. .
* THREE DECKER SANDWICHES
* HOME-MADE PIES
AtNGELO'S RESTAURANT
1100 E. Catherine . . OPEN 7 A.M.-8 P.M. . . 7 days a week
'SWESTINGHOUSE
5 STAR SERVICE
1-SELF SERVICE LAUNDRY in 1 Hour
Wash, fluff dry, and SAVE
FEATURING -
2-DROP-OFF SERVICE
Drop off in the morning - Pick up the Some
Afternoon.
$1 for first 6 pounds - 12c each additional
pound
also
3-48-HOUR SHIRT SERVICE
4-SAME-DAY DRY CLEANING
On Request --

Contribution of an Artist
(continued from Preceding Pagel a producer of needed goods: he in the pursuit of the different
developed a "soul" that craved and leaves the practitioner less energy
oprreal soc al ostrtcis o:un hisneeded expression. These expres- for the perfection of his craft.
not of the powerful minority, and sions were then presented to the The artiste has made the lot,
the masses were inclined to re- public as ultimate truths, absolute of all art practitioners more or
act against him as a tool or agent!beuy less uncomfortable. The rise of
oothe oppressors. ; No longer was the artiste given the middle classes, beginning in
an order worked out more or less the Renaissance, made for the rise
UNDER THE GREEKS a third specifically by the buyer. He now of the artiste also and he flour-
distinction as far as the arts produced works without specific ished, but his era did not last.
are concerned was evolved: the niderationTforteiruseihe new rich, having established
aesthetic - non-aesthetic evalua- ticular locations and contexts. or themselves against the historically
aetei -nnionhti.vaua accepted "commissions." These powerful church and state, no
This division into fine and utili- latter were somewhat similar to longer needed the artiste and he
tarian, separating beauty and the old style orders of the power- found himself out in the cold. It
function, led to a precious, in- groups, but the design and execu- must have been a shock.
tellectualized, concept of art and tion were much more at the dis- The reactions to this rej"ctiofl
a telecualzed cocep ofartandcretion of the artiste.wrvaiuan nomlInn
its uses. In the time of the Greeks were various and normal. Tn an
and Romans this new philosophic- With this development in the hover-compensation for his rejec-
intellectual evaluation did not go classification emerged the notion tion by his past patrons who no
beyond the "fine" arts: practice of an individual style or manner longer needed him, and by his
of the "lesser" arts was considered differing as greatly as possible fellow workers who distrusted him,
undignified for gentlemen and from that of every other practi- he developed the notion, "I, the
patricians, and was given over to tioner in the same field. The de- gifted, sensitive soul, am more im-
the lower classes and slaves who velopment of this style has be- portant than, and superior to, the
would not be demeaned by such come for the artiste the most im- herd."
lowly pursuits. portant aspect of art-meaning,. This has led directly to much
This distinction between the design, and function are incon- of the confusion in the present
mean and the seemly was not con- siderable entities as compared with day as to the role and function of
fined to the West. Similar division the expression of the unique soul the art practitioner and his works
into elegant and plebeian activity in unique modes. both by the practitioner and by
was found in China where only the public, as well as having re-
writing, painting, poetry, music, FOLLOWING the development of sulted in the shearing off of out-
gardening, and architecture were individual style has come the worn tradition and provided a
acceptable of practice by, were in notion of being different, often stimulus to seek out more varied
'fact. largely restricted to, the simply for the sake of being dif- areas and methods of expression.
upper orders, while the other arts ferent.B
and crafts were carried on by the This is known as "being orig- 1jAVING BEEN abandoned, the
low r classes. inal," and has been accompanied artiste jacked himself up by
with a marked deprection of boisterously proclaiming his new
T THE TIME of the Renais- tradition. This attitude toward philosophy and declaring his in-
sance there developed another difference is found in all aspecs dependence from society, its stric-
entity in the artist-role classifica- of our culture and is usually talked tures and conventions. The results
tions: the artiste. He was largely rather than practiced. It is, how- have been both good and bad.
the result of the Greek aesthetics ever, stressed in the arts to the On the positive side was the
-which gave him a sense of the point where, with the expression discovery of many new media,
precious importance of his work- of the soul, it often outranks techniques, and areas that lent
and of the Renaissance ideas of aesthetic quality as a desirable themselves to valid art expres-
the nobility and worth of the in- attribute. sion. The strict notions of "fine"
dividual. These two developments are and applied or mechanic arts were
It was in many ways an un- absurdly limiting, driving the largely destroyed. New insights
happy development. From this artiste either to absurd lengths to into the nature of beauty and its
time on the personality (in its be increasingly different, or in uses in living were achieved.
gross sense) of the artiste was to reverse, catches him in a narrow Important and imposing as these
equal if not outshine the quality stylistic cliche which is inadequate results have been, are the also
and content of his work. for broad or varied discussions. imposing obscurations and confu-
The artiste was no longer simply Also, the time and effort expended See ARTIST, Page 19
~er

Help for Emotionally Ill,
TU' Has a Special Unit for Adolescents
By GERALD LUNDY

1L .. S.._ .. .. ....n ..: t:.. F,.« .. . ..yvF.. v.n nwnr.# ! Hv. v. nn i .. f .r n.srti#nt"t5 r7 at .°ttytt el '{ n [

1

THE University's Neuropsychiat- their capacities ior arousig great tnerr activity centerea arounut e
ric Institute (NPI) was among anxiety" in older patients, friction school, stress and put much weight
the first psychiatric institutions to may occur in such an association. on group and social activities, such
establish antreatment unit solely as parties, games,rand picnics, to
for emotionally disturbed adoles- HIENCE, in some cases, this asso- extract the most from the p,-ycho-
cents when the doors of its Adoles- ciation would benefit neither logical benefits of working and
cent Service unit swung open in adolescent nor adult. playing together, says Dr. Hen-
1956 Dr. Hendrickson says that fric- drickson.
The Adolescent Service, says Dr. tion between adult and adolescent For busy hands and that "rest-
Willard Hendrickson, chief of the patients has spurred some hos- less spirit," there are woodshops,
department, symbolizes the "at- pitals, in some instances, to refuse a gymnasium, a pool table, and
tempt to make the greatest pos- adolescents admittance for psychi swimming pool at Children's Psy-
sible contributions to the people atric care. chiatric Hospital and other recrea-
of the state in this important and These factors were paramount tional activities which the Univer-
previously largely neglected area considerations in a "concerted ef- sity and city offer.
of psychiatric treatment." fort to expand both qualitatively New methods are continually
and quantitatively our treatment being formulated and devised
Sstff of psychiatrists, psy- program for adolescents in the which will enable psychiatrists and
pital ists, psychiatric nurses, adult wards," said Dr. Hendrick- psychologists and, in some in-
hogsssyhtr nreson. ' stances, social caseworkers, to deal
ers adsoccuatioal adewre- Today, the Adolescent Service effectively with the problems of
ers, and occupational and recra-is housed in two units; a ward for the teen-ager, said Dr. Hendrick-
tional therapists is making giant boys and a ward foi girls, son.
strides toward this goal. In the boy's ward, there are fif-
Before the physical establish- teen beds in dormitory type rooms, SOME attempts have been made,!
ment of the Adolescent Service, while the girls ward has the same he says, in the use of group
adolescents were treated in NPI's type rooms with ten beds. There psycho-therapy which have proven
adult wards, are also 20 beds in the adult to be valuable for the patient as
wards which are available for well as for the nurse or phychia-
HERE, about 20 beds were set adolescent patients. trist involved by increasing the
aside for them because NPI's latter's understanding of adoles-
director, Dr. Raymond Waggoner, HESE latter patients are those cents and revealing the complexity
recognized the fact that some I who find it easy to adjust to and extent of their problems.
adolescents are treated best on the adult environmnent without Not only does objective logic
an in-patient basis' rather than causing conflicts, says Dr. Hen- uphold this view, but a previous
in out-patient diagnostic services. drickson. incomplete understanding of ado-'
At first glance, this seems to be The beginning of the adolescent escent emotional problem de-
a desirable procedure; the patients'in-patient service called for the mands this special tratment unit.
are treated while living in the hos- development of treatment and The names of teenagers on cin-
pital. Seemingly, there would be therapeutic programs suitable for ical lists of psychiatric institutions
no exceptional need to establish patients between the ages of 14 supports this need for the adoles-
separate services for adolescents. and 19. cent treatment unit-a need being
However, says Dr. Hendrickson, New ideas were necessary in met by NPIs Adolescent Service.
serious disadvantages to this pro- planning treatment programs. Ob-
cedure can come into play. Sme viously adult treatment programs --
emotionally disturbed adolescents, could not be superimposed as ado-
he continues, live easily in an all- lescent programs. Again the need N E W S T Y L
adult environment responding ef- for a treatment unit specialized in
fectively to treatment-but there the care of adolescents is empha-
are some who do not fit into such sized.
a situation. Staff members closely connected
Then too, there are the adults with the patients have to think
to be considered, says Dr. Hen- along lines that are compatible
drickson. Some "adolescents are with the way that the patient
extremely difficult to treat in this thinks, he said.
environment. With their tenden-
cies to aggressiveness, their physi- IN LINE with this view of "treat-
cal vigor, their need for the most ment adapted to the individual,"
delicate but firm controls~ and the service has its own school with
special teachers trained in the in-
Gerald Lundy is a student struction of psychologically dis-
.n th' 'ounali'm'de""tme't tuored children.
n the journalism department Occupational and recreational
and a former member of The therapists have structured pro-
Michigan Daily editorial staff- grams which would please any
adolescent. These programs,with
---- --- --- ---y

FAMILY STYLE
5400 P Y M OU 1 IP R . -
N. Main right on .S. 12
Saturday and Sumuiy open
C lOSED MON
ANNOUNCING -IN 15
THE UNIVERSITY (
H ISTOR
HTHE MO"DERI
Wr /len by foremost historians f
Columbia, Chicago and oth
Fdiled by Allan Nevins and
NOW AVA1
TIE FIRST FOUR
"COUNTRIES 01

RUSSIA
THE FAR EAST

THE

5-SAVE 25(('

on BUDGET PLAN

SPICIAL PRICF TO FOUN
$24.941
Brwse an
STA"T at N. UN

510 EAST WILLIAMS
From7:30AM to9 P.M.

I

L E S

F I R S T B Y

.r-I

N ***e arg
AUTOMATIC SLIDE PROJECTOR,
This new 500-watt Argus takes the fussing out of
slide shows, puts the fun back in.
One focusing lasts for the whole evening because after
you focus the first slide, they're all in focus. Each
one is pre-conditioned so it shows up sharp and clear.
A simple push-pull of the changer lever is all it takes
to show a slide, change it and put it back in order in
the magazine. What could be easier?
Bring some of your slides in soon, and see just how
beautiful they are with the new Argus Automatic.:

I

i

The Peak Lapel
Tuxedo a
M adue of fine, blac~k all ivool «
tropical iorsted . . . 8 2ounces -
in weight. A new style in
unquestioned formal correctness
that is uncommonly good looking
wiith comfort that is evidenced
the year 'round.
Also available In the classic
shawl lapel.
$7500
OXFORD CLOTHES BURBERRY COATS
ANN ARBOR DETR.OIT
THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZIN\

4r
't,
j d
Fi4Gp'

I

rby

Dine at WEBER'S

NATULT
SLLND
UNPLI
the "cas

For A Delicious Dinner
in Ann Arbor

r
f X 61
jCty t3p

Own your
our liberal
Your I.D. t
1l down, b
Deeerca

I

Delicious
STEAK, CHICKEN,
SEAFOOD
DINNERS

Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and
CHAMPAGNE

D)acro*--Du Pont's podyeuter fibe

I

I

Try Our Tempting

Homemade Pastries

You'll like the look and feeling of con
A large selection of Cummerbund and

a

Reg. 69.50
Prchase Price

$58"8

ADJOINING-
Weber's Holiday Hotel Court

I

id's

th University

3715
Jackson Rd.

Open oDaf,
12 to 9:30 P.M.

State Street on the Camp

16

a

UNDAY, NOVEMBER 23

1' .

ai*

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan