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September 15, 1958 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-15
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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:1

Phoenix Project Harnesses the Atom

U.S. Cultural isplay
Fails in Two Respects

(Continued from Page 3)

sive in the area, has helped these
nations develop combined educa-
tional and research progranis.
Prof. William Kerr of the engi-
neering school and supervisor of
the ICA project described the Uni-
versity as being in a particular-
ly good position to help these na-
tions because the Phoenix Project
started "from scratch" and the in-
dividuals connected with it can ef-
fectively help nations that are
doing the same.
The research areas attracting
other nations varies just as it does
at the University. Some 146 re-
search projects have already been
supported by the Phoenix project,
and use of the reactor is also
made available for industrial re-
search. During the past year, 68
projects were under way, rang-
ing from so-called pure research
to the radiation control of food-
borne parasitic diseases.
R ADIOAC T I.VE tracers and
short-lived radioisotopes which
can be produced in the reactor
and utilized in a matter of a few
seconds, make possible the study
of many fundamental biological
phenomena, an understanding of
which is imperative for advances
in medicine.
Immediate practical uses can be
seen at the University Hospital,
where the bone bank now con-
tains bone sterilized by gamma

dies utilizing tracer doses of ra-
dioiodine indicate that prompt
dagnosis and- adequate treatment
with thyroid pills will prevent ir-
reversible mental and physical re-
tardation.
IN A COMPLETELY different
area of research, the Univer-
sity has emerged as a clearing
house for national and interna-
tional legal problems involving
nuclear energy and engineering..
And in still another direction,
work continues on the bubble
chamber which is providing a bet-
ter understanding of high energy
nuclear particles.
The original bubble chamber
research began at the University
with a $1,500 Phoenix Project
grant and resulted in a "major
breakthrough' in man's efforts to
learn more about the composition
of matter. Research in the field
now reaches the multi-million
dollar level and is being support-
ed at a number of universities
with federal government funds.es
But among the unique accom-
plishments of the Phoenix Project
has been its ability to pioneer re-
search in a wide variety of areas,
and aid research abroad on the
impetus provided by private, not
governmental funds.
Over 30,000 University students,
alumni and friends and 350 com-
panies contributed more than $7,-
500,000 to the fund.
(Concluded on Page 12)

(Continued from Page 5)
children do not believe that
Americans can have the toys they'
see in the toy window, and turn
up their noses. One has an al-
most irrepressible desire to in-
sist to them it's all true, every bit
of it. The home (particularly
kitchen) furnishings attract wo-
men in 'droves.
CULTURALLY, however, the
United States has failed bad-
ly in two important departments:
art and literature. The art exhi-
bit is extensive, but weak. It is
divided into two sections, one on
colonial painting, the other on
contemporary painting and sculp-
ture. The colonial paintings re-
semble nothing so much as some
of the Dutch portraits of the 16th
century and the period before
Rembrandt. It is simple and se-
vere, and draws sympathetic
smiles from many of the visitors;
most, however, run through it
quickly.
The modern work, on the other
hand, gets plenty of attention,
but mostly of the puzzled variety.
Half a dozen people are al-
most always gathered around a
piece of sculpture entitled "Sum,
mer Evening,' which suggests
nothing so much as a woman sun-
bathing.

Their responses are not grati-
fying. One woman walked through
the entire art exhibit' without
changing expression, glanced at
the entrance to the American
theatre on the way out, and
promptly tugged her husband
over to admire the red plush car-
pet on the floor there.
LITERATURE, however, is in a
t worse way, for the only books
in the pavilion are a random se-
lection of paperbacks on sale (at
double the American price) in a
Typical American Drug Store.
None of the "quality" paperbacks
are represented. Hardcover 'pub-
lishers have absolutely no space;
only Encyclopedia Americana has
an exhibit-and it is in the Inter-
national Shopping Center, at the
other end of the Fair!
In the dramatic arts, however,
the Americans runroughshod over
their competition. Although "Car-
ousel" did. surprisingly poorly,
Benny Goodman sold out for a
week straight, and the orchestral
concerts are well a'ttended.
In addition, college jazz bands
are brought over each week to en-
tertain on the island in the middle
of the American lagoon; they
draw tremendous crowds and ap-
plause each afternoon.
Further, a remarkable process

i

RESEARCH -- Technician (left) inserts a meteorite fragment into the pneumatic "rabbitt" system
which enables activation of elements that cannot be detected by conventional methods, while re-
searcher (right) prepares an experimental reactorbeam-port plug for a study of intensive radiation's
effects in cracking hydrocarbons.

PAINTING-This general view of the contemporary American
paintings exhibit shows a few of the oil paintings and photographs
from America on disnlav

radiation. Phoenix-sponsored re-
search proved the feasibility of
the method, which permits hand-
ling in a sealed glass tube, over-
coming some of the difficulties of
using bone preserved by cold stor-
age.
Four investigations have led to

progress in the fight against can-
of cell structure and the metab-
olism of cancer tissue.
Mental problems are also be-
ing attacked through the facili-
ties of the Phoenix Project. A stu-
dy, the first recorded in medical
literature, was made of institu-

cer, adding to the understanding
tionalized cretins' with I.Q.'s of
less than sixty who had been born
either with an underactive thyroid
or none at all. Comparisons with
individuals whose I.Q.'s were al-
most normal in spite of thyroid
underactivity since birth and stu-

called "Circarama," in which a
movie screen runs entirely around
the audience from eye level to
the roof (about six feet farther
up) draws full houses all day long;
people wait a┬░precious half hour
in line to get in for this 20-minute

travelogue on America (in Eng-
lish, French, and Flemish, fortu-
nately). The process was perfect-
ed by Walt Disney.
The ubiquitous Harlem Globe-
trotters also stop in occasionally
at the Fair, and receive roaring

t
t

ElII

with

YoU

In

mind!

Dance Classes Exclusively
Reserved For University Students
SPECIAL OFFER
for 100 People
5 PRIVATE HOURS
5 CLASS HOURS
5 PARTY HOURS
TOTAL! 15 HOURS
REGISTER NOW!
Deadline Saturday, Sept. 27th
Studio Open 10 A.M--10 P.M.
All Arthur Murray Students Are
Invited to Attend Parties
Show ... Channel 4- Detroit

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THE DISC SHOP
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NO 2-5539

OPEN EVENINGS

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ge Four THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE
,

ME

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