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November 16, 1958 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T MICMG AN DAILY

SU\'DAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,

L ANSER w

Jones Leads Hoosiers to Victory

INSIDE CHATTER

I Til

by Si COLEMAN

I

C Aw AP Pm N LE
to H E HUMAN esT ICE

As

'M' Drops

Home

Finale,

8-6

(Continued from Page 1)

.

The Hoosiers gained their lead
early in the quarter, after the

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two teams had battled to an un-
eventful and scoreless first half.
Fullback Vic Jones, who was a
smashing runner all day, and half-
back George Smith carried the
ball most of the scoring drive that
went from the Indiana 49 to pay-
dirt in only 11 play's.
Smith Scores
Smith scored the six-pointer on
a two-yard slash off right tackle,
and added the two conversion
points on an identical play.
The touchdown came suddenly,
since both teams had been strong
on defense and ineffective on
offense in the first half. Indiana
had gained 125 yards, while Mich-
igan could advance only 40. Neither
team passed much, with Michi-
gan gaining eight yards by air to
Indiana's 0.
However, the Hoosiers came
Pack with a fury in the second
half, and ended the game with
232 yards by rushing. They at-
tempted only two passes, one of
which was intercepted.
Second Half No Better
Michigan, on the other hand,
could do no better in the second
half except for the sporadic pass-
ing that kept them in the game.
They ended up with 54 yards by
ground and 84 by the air.
The one Michigan touchdown
came in quick response to the
Indiana counter, so that all of
the scoring came in the third
quarter.
Myers got off a beautiful 67-yd.
punt that Wilbert Scott had to
run after and pick up on the
Indiana 12-yard line. From there
Hoosier halfback Tom MacDonald
quick-kicked out of bounds on the
Indiana 35-yard line.
New Ife
Oosterbaan threw some new life
into therline-up, as Stan Noskin
took over for Ptacek-who had
tirelessly ran the team from the

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game's start and Harry Newman
and Jim Byers came in at halfback
and fullback.
Noskin called Newman's number
the first two plays, and the sopho-
more flash ripped off gains of
nine and ten yards. After Byers
was stopped for two up the center,
Noskin calmly dropped back and
tossed a perfect pass to Newman,
who outran the Indiana defenders
for a 14-yard touchdown play.
Fail To Score
However, the Wolverines failed
to score the two-point conversion
when Myers was hauled down on
an off-tackle slant on which Mich-
igan was guilty of illegal motion
in the backfield. The signals were
muffed, and Myers' blocking fail-
ed to materialize.
- Michigan appeared to be ready
to take over the game at this
time, however,has - the defense
stiffened and Halstead recovered
an Indiana fumble on the Hoosier
20-yard line. But the new drive
was short-lived.
After Ptacek gained a yard off
right end, Oosterbaan sent in the
same backfield combination that
had been successful a few moments
earlier.
Newman Pass Intercepted
They didn't work well this time,
however, as Newman's wobbly pass
was picked off by an Indiana de-
fender on the first play, and the
Wolverines never threatened again
until the final surge that set up
Harper's field goal attempt.
The Michigan line was out-
played most of the game, and that
enabled the Hoosier backs to
drastically outgain Michigan, and
also meant that the 'M' passers
were forced to eat the ball as often
as they threw it.
New Backs Look Best
It was the fresh backs that had
seldom played before, such as
Newman and Batsakes, that looked
best for the Wolverines. The Mich-
igan seniors, who along with
Oosterbaan played their last game
in Michigan Stadium, were unable
to turn a number of scoring
chances into a farewell victory.
It was, perhaps, -a shame. But
that has been the story all year.

Some Brightness
MICHIGAN LOST another football game. It was Bennie Ooster-
baan's last home game as head coach. It was the last home con-
test for several seniors. It rained almost continuously from the
opening kickoff and the field was turned into a slippery, slushy grid-
iron. All of these factors could have thrown a damper over the entire
game but that didn't happen. Despite all the dreariness that sur-
rounded Michigan Stadium yesterday, certain rays of brightness did
break through the outlying drabness.
For the first time since the Michigan State game the Wolverines
as a team showed spirit and fight. When Michigan made its last-
ditch drive against Indiana, and almost pulled the game out of the
fire, the entire team was off the bench and yelling encouragement
to their teammates on the field. It felt good to see everyone charged
up, rather than just the same individuals who have 'displayed spirit
all year.
The few fans that were at the game are true Michigan loyalists,
An unsuccessful football team and a drenching storm are strong de-
terrents to attendance. The crowd was sparse, but those that came
let it be known that they were still behind their team. Their cheering
and moral support was another of the bright events of the day. Per-
haps the most admirable group in the stadium yesterday was the
band. Always regarded as the center of Michigan spirit, the band
proved that it deserved this claim. Under all sorts of adverse condi-
tions, the musicians put on one of their finest shows of the season.
Post-Game Comment .,
IT TAKES about five minutes to get from the press box to the dress-
ing rooms if you can run quickly and zig zag your way through the
crowd that gathers in the tunnel which leads to the locker rooms.
Yesterday's small crowd made my trip relatively easy. As I Jogged
toward the tunnel I tossed around in my head the possible questions
that I could ask when I reached my destination.
Bennie, what feelings did you experience realizing this was your
final home appearance as head coach? "There really was no differ-
ence in the way I felt," the coach commented. "You're always out
to win, and that's the way I felt today."
Across the steam-filled room I spotted Oosterbaan's successor
chatting with what appeared to be a few high school prospects.
Waiting until he was finished talking, I took the opportunity to aslC
Bump Elliott a few questions. Bump, have you given any thought as
to whom your assistants will be next year? The personable 33-yr.
old mentor replied: "I haven't given any thought at all to next year.
I've Just been thinking about our last two games this year." Without
any effort, Bump presented a picture of confidence and I couldn't
help feeling that the future of Michigan football is in competent
hands.
Several ex-Michigan stars were at yesterday's game. Two of them
are in this area because of today's Detroit Lions-San Francisco 49er
game in Detroit. Tom Harmon viewed the game from the press box.
He watched the mud battle with intensity and no doubt there were
many times during the contest that his mind roamed back to 1939
and 1940 when the name of Harmon and Michigan were synonomous.
Harmon is broadcasting the pro game back to the Pacific Coast today.
Pace in T oWn . .
THE OTHER EX-MICHIGAN great will be playingin today's pro
game. Jim Pace, who almost single-handedly beat Indiana, 27-13,
exactly one year ago was in the Michigan locker room after the game.
I took a few moments to talk to the speedster who is currently with
the 49ers to learn how he liked playing professional football. "In pro
ball everybody is good - even the guys who are sitting on the bench.
Pace remarked that he liked playing pro football, particularly for a
California team which plays most of its games in 80-degree weather.
Pace expects to begin a six-month hitch in the Army in January.
I left the dressing room and slowly strolled back through the
tunnel. The fans that had slowed my first trip to the locker room had
long since made their exit from the mammouth stadium. I reached
the field and saw a group of kids rolling in the mud and playing
some kind of a football game. I could hear their mothers yelling when
they arrived home. Two men, undoubtedly old Michigan grads, stag-
gered up the middle of the field from one goal line to the other, sing-
ing' how proud they were of Michigan. And in one corner of the
stands ,two youths were shouting "The Victors" as loudly as possible.
Yes, Michigan lost the football game but it was not a totally black day.

-Daily---eler Anderson
NEWMAN SPARKS OFFENSE-Harry Newman, a sophomore
halfback who has played seldom but scored often, moves for a
gain of 10 yards in the pictures above. In picture I he moves
toward the line and appears to be hemmed in, then in 2 he slips
away from Indiana tacklers, and in 3 picks up some blocking from
Jim Gray (77) to move for the gain. Newman scored Michigan's
only touchdown two plays later on a 14-yd. pass from Stan Noskin.
Game Statistics

THIS BLUE KEDS LABEL STAMPS
THE SHOE OF CHAMPIONS

Ca u Bootery
304 South State

Mich. Ind.
FIRST DOWNS 8 15
Rushing 3 15
Passing 5 0
Penalty 0 0
TOTAL NO. OF RUSHES 28 64
NET YDS.--Rushing 54 232
Passing 84 0
PASSES ATTEMPTED 19 2
Completed 9 0
Intercepted by 1 2
Yards interceptions
returned 3 21
TOTAL PLAYS
(Rushes and Passes) 47 66
PUNTS, Number 5 5
Average distance 46 27
KICKOFFS, returned by 1 3
YDS. KICKS RETURNED 44 113
Punts 19 16

Kickoffs
FUMBLES, Number
Bal Lost by
PENALTIES, Number
Yards penalized

25
2
3
25

97
5
2
<2
19

FOURTH WIN, 5-1
Engineers
Soccer. Clb Tos, ll

Special to the Daily
GRAND RAPIDS - The Wol-
verine Soccer Club overwhelmed
Calvin College yesterday, 5-1, to
gain their fourth consecutive win

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ACROSS
1. Sum
6. Getintothe-.
10.Harden
11. Evergreen
12. Native of
second largest
state
13. Palo -
14. Helps
15. Cabbage dish'
16. Nest (Fr.)
17. The Pres.
18. Impassive
22. Said "yes"
25. There's a
filter on the
-of King-Size
Kool
26. Period of time
27 Squabble
80. Just takes one
bad one
$4. Cultural
subjects
(2 words)

DOWN
1. Big men from
ancient state
1. Half of A
quarter(2;wods)
1. Penguin's
costume
1. I smell-
(2 words)
6. They make
spectacles
of them
8. In Germany,
they're bad
7. Kools' penguin
8. Volume absorbed
9. Talked cat
19. Girl's name
20, Opposite of
output1
21. Clerical degree
22. Poet Housman
23. King Arthur's
men sought it
24. Absorbed

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"ARE YOU K(DL 6
ENOUGH TO I
KRACK THIS?"

I _- -1 - -1 -

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---4-i-

- 9 -.,-

of the season aiid continue a win-
ning skein that goes back to 1956.
Held to one tally in the first
period on rain soaked Calvin
Field, the Wolverines exploded in
the second half to score four goals
and completely rout the Calvin
Club.
Each Score Twice
Emin Oker and Kweku Mensah
were the Wolverine offensive
standouts of the day. Each scored
twice. Captain Mitch Oprea boot-
ed home the first Wolverine goal
to tie the score in the first half.
Dominating middle field play,
Rubins Filizola at inside left and
Jose Reines at left half succeeded
in breaking up the brunt of the
Calvin attack.
Oktar Stays Home
Erol Oktar, outstanding Wol-
verine left wing, didn't make the
trip because of, an injury sus-
tined at Ohio University last
week.
The club meets the University
of Toronto here next Sunday to
close their season.
Read Daily Classifiedsa

Iy
ON-CAMPUS
INTERVIEWS
NOV.17, 1958
tk8 arrang1 t ts/
with your Ptacoment
Of ficer NOW

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