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November 02, 1958 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-02
Note:
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FLOWERS
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334 South State Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan NO 3-5049
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S8Ce SALE
($1.00 to $3.00 Values)
COSTUME JEWELRY
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209 South Sate St.
(Below Marshalls sBook Store)
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Oct. 29,1929-Just Another Day
The Weather Was Dismal But Times Were Good;
Stock Market Irregularities Worried Few People

A

Window to the Communist

N

Poland, Seeking Western Contacts, Again Welcomes Tourist

By STEPHEN HEILPERN

By THOMAS TURNER

NEW YORK City was damp and1
chilly. The mercury hadI
reached 50 shortly after noon,
then slumped back into the
middle 40's.
The weather was about the only;
depressing topic New Yorkers
could talk of. The Twenties were
still roaring, and no one was car-
ing about the weather. A retreatI
to a nearby speakeasy would make
you forget the gloominess of the
Tuesday afternoon.
Some worry-warts were trying
to stop the October fun by
prophesying doom; the recent ir-
regularities of the stock market
were making them feel uneasy.I
Bosh! The Federal Reserve Board
had just told everyone there'd be
nothing to worry about.
Most people were too busy to
let themselves be bothered with
Wall Street's little problems. Busy
making money, busy spendingi
money. No trouble making it, less
trouble spending it. .
TAKE John D. Rockefeller, for
instance. His dream of build-
ing a city within a city was grad-
ually coming true. He had just~
picked the architects for the
project.
Wherever people went they
were being assured that the Thir-
ties would be even more prosper-
ous. A brokerage firm had placed
an advertisement in The Times
saying, "In our opinion the pres-
ent affords a favorable opportu-
nity to acquire the stocks of banks
and insurance companies for
long-range investments."
U.S. Steel had announced an
extra dividend of one dollar, Al-
bie Booth was creating a sensa-
tion with his great play for Yale's
eleven, Arnold Constable was
selling $75 silk-lined suits with
the two-button cut, and -Marl-
boros were costing 20 cents for1
"those who can afford the best."
Congress was deciding wheth-
er or not to pass the Smoot-Haw-
ley tariff law, and Norman
Thomas, Jimmy Walker and Fior-
ello LaGuardia were running for
mayor.
ARTHUR Hammerstein was ad-t
mitting publicly for the first1
time that "talkies" were affecting

The legitimate stage was also
having an excellent season. A
young songstress named Gertrude
Lawrence was at the Empire,
George DM. Cohan was starring in
his own show at the Fulton, and
Eddie Cantor's big hit, "Whoopee"
was attracting standing-room-
only crowds at the New Amster--
dam.
It was a special day for the
opera fans. The Met was opening
that night with "Manon Lescaut,"
with Lucrezia Bori in the title
role.
The only people out of luck on
Tuesday, October 29, 1929, were
those who couldn t make the
shows that evening. Even ihese
unfortunates, however, could'find
solace. If they happened to be
lucky enough to own a radio they
could look forward to listening to
Paul Whiteman's program at 9.
HOW DID Ann Arbor spend the
29th of October?
The weather was the same as
in New York. The University's
9,399 students - a record enroll-
ment -- were complaining about
the rain and/or bluebooks, and
were even more oblivious to the
faint heart murmur of Wall
Street.
Coach Harry Kipke's mairr wor-
ry was his football team. He
might have a chance against Har-
vard next Saturday, if he could
only come up with a scoring
punch.
Townspeople were having dif-
ficulty in telling male students
from coeds; the boyish "flat
look" was still evident among the
girls.
The campus was buzzing with
talk of Larry Gould, Michigan's
famous geologist, who had recent-
ly left with Richard E. Byrd for
Antarctica.
WALTER RAE, assistant dean
of students, was notifying ev-
eryone that he was going to crack
down on those students driving,
cars without permit tags.
For those who weren't being
faced with tests the next day, the
Whitney Theatre was offering a
musical revue, and the Michigan,
Majestic and Wuerth theatres
were presenting popular films.
It was a normal 1929 day in
Ann Arbor, as it was in New York.
But that's not what the history
books tell us. The market almost
hit rock-bottom that Tuesday aft-
ernoon. The Panic was on, and a
wonderful decade was to come to
a not-so-wonderful end.

POLAND, devastated by war andI
retarded by Communism, is
again welcoming Western tourists.
Tourists from the West can
provide a real shot in the arm
for the sagging Polish economy,
since most visitors now come from
the other "socialist countries" of
Eastern Europe and bring with
them levas or marks as worthless
as the Polish zloty.
And because many Poles are
also interested in increasing con-
tact with the West, the visitor is
provided with an opportunity for
great insight into an unwilling
satellite, her Communism and her
character.
rVURS of Poland begin in War-
saw, if only because it is the
capital and transportation hub.
Never the most beautiful city
in Poland, Warsaw in 1945 was
a smoldering heap of broken brick.I
New apartments have gone up
since to alleviate what was surely
the most serious housing shortage
in all Europe.
But these buildings are of ne-
cessity dull, grey and uninterest-
ing.
They suffer, moreover, from
Russia's stultifying architectural
influence.
The dozens of palaces and gov-
ernment buildings left by cen-
turies of royal rule had for the
most part survived the period
When Poland was partitioned be-
tween Prussia, Russia and Austria,
but the majority are gone now,
leveled by the Germans along
with everything else in the. after-
math of 1945's ill-fated Warsaw
Uprising.
BUT WARSAW was Poland's
capital, and the people of this
country, which had lost 40 per'
cent of its natural wealth, dug
down deep to rebuild her.
The product of their efforts is
the Old City and the New City,
restored to 17th and 18th century
appearance, which was for the
Thomas Turner, a night edi-
/or on The Michigan Daily, spent
the summer in Poland, living
three weeks with a family in
Warsaw and touring the country.

I
the
th
Wa
Pa
P
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Z
ati
tra
cor
an
con
the
Kez
and
Stu
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why
poi
abo
IN
of
200
frc
inv

MOUNTAINEER-Many Poles such as this river ANTI-FASCIST MONUMENT -- Nearly every
guide make their living off the combination of Polish city and town has its own version of the
old customs and beautiful scenery which charac- Red Army memorial, commemorating the "lib-
terize the Tatra Mountains of southern Poland. eration" of Poland in 1944 and 1945.

most part the appearance of 1939.
These two "cities" within War-
saw together make an island of
charm perhaps a dozen blocks
long within the drab city.
Warsaw's truly new buildings,
on the other hand, while repre-
sented most commonly in drab
new apartments are symbolized by
the monstrous Palace of Culture
and Science. This gift to Poland
"in the name of Josef Stalin" is
32 stories high in a city where
few buildings go over four.
YARNCRAFT
SHOP
has everything
for anything
in knitting
VarnerAft hoe
10'Nickels Arcade

V / fThe

New York by Night

I ncor

Stephen Heilpern, a former
associate sports editor of The
Michigan Daily, tells a story
about the stock market crash
that isn't in the history books.

;
C
I
C
x


the legitimate stage. The Broad-
way producer was saying that
there might be a future for him in
Hollywood.
Sound pictures were taking
New York by storm, Lenore Ulric
was making her talkie debut in
"Frozen Justice," at the Roxy, the
Capitol was presenting Marion
Davies in "Marianne," and the
Central was also doing 'ecord
box-office business with "Dis-
raeli," starring George Arliss.

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