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September 15, 1958 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r Groups Available to Students

Matmen Lose 2 Stars-;
Gain New Sop homores

(Continued from Page 2)
me by Club members: pleas-
ailing, races between mem-
and races by the club team
st teams from other schools.
e club picks the top sailors
within its own membership
ke up the team. The Michi-
rew is one of the best in the
est and is ranked high na-
tly. Competing in six regat.
1the past year, the club crew
hree and finished second in
others.
eir victories came in the Pur-
pring Invitational, the State
ichigan Championship and
nummerlee Memorial held at
etroit Yacht Club.
e of the team's seconds came
e Midwest Championships at
son, Wis. This second place
. qualified them for the Na-
I Championships, which were
at New Port Beach, Cal. this
ier.
npeting for the Wolverines
ew Port Beach were Bruce-
mith, Otto Scherer, Dexter
e and Ron Sisson.
ULLR Ski Club
e Ulr Ski Club is the offi-
skiing organization of the
rsity of Michigan. Activities
1 were undertaken this past
included a trip to Stowe, Vt.,
g Christma svacation, a trip
oyne Mountain between se-
rs, and another excursion
ig Easter Vacation to Aspen,
More than 40 members made
rip to Aspen.
e club was also host for the
gan Intercollegiate Ski Meet
past season. Competing in'
the men's and women's divi-
Michigan won first place in

The club has its own ski slope
north of Ann Arbor at: Peach
Mountain. During the year the
club manages to have a couple of
social functions, and holds an an-}
nual banquet each spring.sn
According to club president
Charles Hancock, there has been
an increased interest in the sport;
thus, he thinks the club will be-
come even larger and do even
more this semester.
The club, which offers assistance
both in lessons and equipment se-
lection is open to anyone inter-
ested in skiing ana should appeal'
to everyone from beginner to ex-
pert.
Riflemen Have Club

The Michigan Rifle Club, which
has about 50 members, is another
active organization on campus.
After club meetings, held on
Tuesday nights, members have
shooting practice.. For club dues
members get all necessary equip-
ment for shooting except ammu-
nition, which they must buy them-
selves.,
At the practice, older members
offer advice to new, inexperienced
members, helping them to develop
their skill.
Piclks 'Six-Man Team
From its membership the club
picks a six man' team and two al-
ternates to compete against other
schools. The Rifle Club team: has
been very successful, winning the
Big Ten championship last year
for the fourth time. in a row.'
The team placed three members
on the All-Big Ten team: Tom
Athanas, William Woodruff- and
Keith Johnson. Athanas was also
the Big Ten individual champion.
The Wolverine Soccer Club is a

SAILING CLUB ,
- enters competition

campus organization with around,
30 members, about half of whom
are foreign students.
This entirely self-supporting or-
ganization is seeking varsity sta-
tus. Because soccer' isx a varsity
sport at many Big Ten schools,
Michigan was able{ to schedule
only three contests last Fall.
In the only game against a Big
Ten team, Michigan tied Confer-
ence champion Michigan State.
At present, the main activities
of the club are intramural games
and practices, which are held at
Wines Field. Movies of some of the
great foreign teams are shown at
periodic club meetings.
Michigan Captain Bob Burnett
hopes that within the near future
this international sport will be-
come Michigan's 11th varsity
sport.

By DAVE LYON
Michigan's 1957-58 wrestling
accomplishments can be told more
in terms' of individual grapplers
than of the team.
Although Coach Cliff Keen's
mat squad posted only a 3-6-1
dual meet record and finished.
tied for fifth in the Big Ten meet,
there were several ways in which
a pair of individuals distingushed
themselves.
Senior Max' Pearson, one of
Michigan's greatest wrestlers, last
season competed in weight divi-
sions ranging from 130 to 147
pounds, but was at his best at 130.
Tops Stroud for Title
The genial captain had some
difficulties early 'in the season, but
became sharper as time wore on.
He was never better than in the
Big Ten meet, as he roared through
preliminary matches and then'
hung a 5-2 'decision on Michigan
State's Don Stroud for the 130-lb.
title.
Prior to the Conference meet,
Stroud had been beaten only once
during the season, that by a 9-2
decision to Pearson in a Michigan-
MSU dual meet.
Voted Outstanding
Big Ten mat coaches recognized
Pearson's impressive performance
in the Conference meet by voting
him "Outstanding Wrestler of the
Tournament."'
After his Big Ten meet triumph,
Pearson went to the.NCAA'cham-
pionship affair- at Laramie, Wyo.,
as Michigan's only entry in that
event. He disposed of the first

three opponents he faced and.
gained the right to meet Iowa
State's undefeated Les Anderson
for the 130-lb. national title.
A fine finish gave Anderson four
quick points to make the final score
7-5. Ironically, this was the same
score by which Penn State's John-
ny Johnston had edged Pearson in
the NCAA 130-lb. final' the year
before.
But all considered, the Michigan
captain's season performance in
1958 was more than commendable.
Marchello Undefeated
There was another senior, Jack
Marchello, who at the start of
last season was hesitant about'
wrestling at all, since -he was car-
rying a heavy academic load. But
he decided in favor of mat compe-;
tition and competed for the first
time in Michigan's second meet of
the season, against Indiana.
Marchello, wrestling at 167
pounds, shut out Hoosier Norm
Komorowski, 6-0, and then pro-
ceeded to run up an 11-match vic-
tory string climaxed by his win-
ning the Big Ten 167-pound cham-
pionship.
His victim in the Conference fi-
nals was Minnesota's highly-rated
Bill Wright, beaten by the same 6-
0 score with which Marchello had
begun the season.
Declines NCAA Chance
The Wolverine grappler, having
realized his goal of regaining the
Big Ten championship he had won
in 1956, declined to go to the
NCAA because of his concern for
his studies.
Outside of Marchello and Pear-.
son, however, Michigan's team was
not ;especially strong. This lack of
depth was most apparent in the
Big Ten meet, where despite' the
two individual champions, the
Wolyerine squad finished in a
fifth-place tie,
Of Michigan's 28 points in the
Conference affair, 26 of them we'e
the direct result of Marchello and
Pearson's net successes. The two
other Big Ten teams which had
two individual titlists each-Iowa
and Illinois-placed 1-2 in the
meet.

What depth Michigan had at the
season's start received a severe
jolt wrlen veteran heavyweight
Steve Zervas was declared ineli-
gible for second-semester compe-
tition. '
Replacing Zervas was Fred Olm,'
and although he performed capab
ly for his'lack of experience, it is
easy to speculate that Zervas
would have done better.
The third-best Wolverine mat-
man of 1958 was junior Larry
Murray, who wrestled at various
times at 123, 130, and 137 pounds.
Falls To Hit Teak
Karl Lutomski- competed in the
177-1b. slot during the season, and
although at times he showed
flashes 4f good wrestling;, he never
attained the peak he had reached
in the 1957 Big Ten champion-.
ships, when he finished third in
his weight division.,
Mike Hoyles was Michigan's us-
ual entry in the 123-1b. class last
year. He suffered many close loss-
es' by decision during the season,
improving slowly but steadily.
Keen filled his 'trouble spots" at
147 and 157 pounds with Dick
Summerwill, Tom Leith, or Wayne
King. Summerwill was unable. to
wrin In competition,: but Leith and
King showed promise by winning
about half their matches.
Outlook, Encouraging
Despite the graduation of Mjch-
igan's two best wrestlers, Marchel-
lo and Pearson, last June, the' out-
look for Keen's 34th season at
Michigarn is encouraging.
Among. the many promnising
sophomore standouts are Bart
Kruze-'and Gordon Swix at 123-
lbs.; Ambrose Wilbanks at.130;
Jay Young at 137; Jim Blaker and
Wilfred Hildebrand at 147; Dick
Fronczak and .Don. Courriere at
157; Dennis Fitzgerald and Carl
Fink at 177; and heavyweight Guy
Curtis,
Many former high school cham-
pions are included in this list, and
if most of these sophomores de-
velop, Michigan could make it in-
teresting for any other Big Ten
team, during the coming, season.

DUAL-MEET THREAT - 'Larry Murray, captain of this
wrestling team, is a rugged dual-meet competitor. He didn'
his weight limit in the Big Ten last year, but should be
contender this season.
PORT-WHYS
< 'S

,:
1

" " " / 11

A New Dean
ICHIGAN HAS a new dean of coaches. For as
people connected with Michigan athletics
Fisher was the coach with the longest tenure.
baseball season Fisher's retirement was forced d
limit.

L

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IMAGINATION

Fisher had been coaching the "M" nine for $8 years. Th
dean has been around almost as long. Cliff Keen will enter his
season this winter when the Michigan wrestlers take to the
against Big Ten oppinents.
In more ways tha length of tenure the two coaches are
comparable. 'Both can boast predominately winning teams throt
the years. Keen has tutored six Conference championship teams
Perhaps the , most marked resemblance between the two
probably the most significant, is the youthfulness that they e
for their age. Fisher, even last season at 70, was always out" c
diamond during practice. He would show his players how to
how to hit, and any other skills.necessary. Keen can be found at
practice session, dressed in his sweat suit, and out on the wrestlir
going through the holds that he wants to teach.
This direct participation of the coach often makes the diffi
between a good and an excellent team. To SHOW the boys rathe:
TELL them puts vitality in the learning process. It is far more efi
than the armchair techniques used by most men that have be
the game over 30 years.
Interest on All Levels...
KFE's INTEREST in the 'grappling sport extends - far beyor
college field. With the goal of building a stronger all-around in
in the sport on a nationwide level, he has taken part in pro
aimed at the high school and
junior high age groups.
His son, Jim, is a star on the
Ann Arbor High School team, and
Keen attends all of the high school
meets. As director of the state
wrestling meet this past year he
acted as a 'smooth, administrator
and an interested spectator from
the recruiting angle.
He has also shown great interest
in the AAU competition, and sends

"Yeah . . a bikini.. then wh
walked up and asked me...

,; ,

It

his freshmen wrestlers to the
meets whenever possible. Olympic
competition has also been one of
Keen's :interests.
The "M" coach Aas helped to
improve the wrestling sport from
an equipment' angle. He has in-,
,vented knee pads, elbow pads, and.
last ,year introduced- a much im-
proved head gear. All of these help to cut
sport safer for all. concerned.

CLIFF KEEN
* .. 34th seasoni
down injuries, ma

K

Well, plan on lots of sessions like this ahead of you .. . and
plan on some pretty wonderful performances, too! Just to
set the record straight, though, you'll find it won't take
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.. . Brngs Deserved Honors
HOVEVER, last winter, at the Iowa-Michigan wrestling meet
verine Athletic Director H. 0. "Fritz" Crisler presented Keen
a plaque designating him one of the original members of the n
formed Collegiate Wrestling Hall of Fame. The award was made i
name of the Helms Foundation.
.The Wolverine coach said that the greatest honor of his
career came from his wrestlers, and not from any award to hi
"My greatest thrill and honor," he said, "was to have two of my
win the Outstanding Wrestler Award at the Big Ten meets in si
sive years."
These two--Mike. Rodriguez and Max Pearson-are only a c
of the outstanding men that have wrestled for Keen. If he feels
ored each time that one of his wrestlers is honored, as he ri
should, Michigan has a truly honorable dean of coaches.

,

CAMELET BROTHERS has been on the Michigan Campus for more than
thirty years. During this time the CAMELET BROTHERS label has become
the symbol of a unique fashion rightness that never goes out of style.;
It is only natural then that gentlemen with a flair for good appearance
and an appreciation of good quality and conservative styling would
come to depend on CAMELET BROTHERS. In the future as in the past we
will show many new fabrics and fashions in the tradition we have
established. In our newly enlarged store we have larger selections of
both clothing and furnishings as well as many special gift items.

x2 J - aa h I 1

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