100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

owa

Favored

To

Overcome

Michigan

Grid inx'

11 Defense Set To Halt
)uncan's Passing Attack

MSU BATTLES WISCONSIN:
OSU Faces NU in Big Ten Feature

(Continued from Page 1)
His favorite receivers have been
ends Curt Merz and Don Norton,
and the entire backfield. Fullback
Don Horn ranks behind the two
ends, while halfbacks Ray Jau-ch,
Kevin Furlong and Bob Jeter has
also frequently been dangerous
targets. .
Aside from the formidable pass-
ing attack, the Iowans are also one
of the best rushing outfits in the
Conference. Jauch is the Big Ten
lekder with 340 yards in 45 at-
tempts fo ra 7.5 average.
Furlong, Horn and second-
stringer Jeter are close behind, all
running regularly with better than
four yards per try averages.
Line Less Publicized
Behind the great publicity that
has followed the Iowa backfield,
the fact that they have a rugged
line has almost gone unnoticed.
Wolverine Coach Bennie Ooster-
baan, however, fears that the Iowa
squad will have one of the toughest
forward walls that Michigan will
face this year.
"cOur scouts state that the Iowa
line is big and rugged," Oosterbaan
said. "This is certainly the secret
of their great offense, They are
also tough on defense, and rush
hard."
Toughest Thus Far
Michigan will certainly be up
against its toughest opponent thus
far. Oosterbaan pointed out the
fact that seems to make the out-
TODAY'S LINEUP

come obvious-"Iowa is the Big
Ten's top offensive team, while
Michigan is the Conference's worst
defensive team. We really have our
work cut out for us."
There are some indications that
Michigan will be in better shape
for this game than it has been for
weeks. The injured list has been
cut, so that no one but those lost
for the seasoni-John Herrnstein
and Willie Smith-are out.
Few on Doubtful List
However, there are still a few
on the doubtful Isit. Tackle George
Genyk will start, but is still both-
ered by a pinched nerve in the
neck. Jim Byers, who has made
an amazing recovery after pro-
nounced "lost" for the season, may
be available for use at the weak-
ened fullback position,
Oosterbaan is planning to start
Gene Sisinyak, who was outstand-
ing against Minnesota, now that
Tony Rio is suspended until court
action is taken on his charged
involvement in the parlay cards
scandal.
Sophomore John Walker will
back Sisinyak, while flyers can be
used for further support if neces-
sary. "We probably won't use him
unless necessary," Oosterbaan said,
"since he isn't fully back in shape
yet."
Other Backs Same
Aside from Sisinyak, the back-
field will be the same as last
week's, with Bob Ptacek at quar-
terback and Darrell Harper and
Fred Julian at the halves. Brad
Meyers, Reid Bushong and Gary
McNitt are all in shape to fill in
at either half, while Stan Noskin
will be ready to go as Ptacek's
understudy.
Of course, the question is not so
much Michigan's offensive power,
as the previous lack of defense. It
will take a surprising show of
strength and spirit for Michigan
to pull an upset-but, of course, 35
years is little different than 34.

By TOM WITECKI
Defending Big Ten Champion
Ohio State. rated fifth nationally,
meets eleventh-ranked 'orthwest-
ern in the feature gamge of a full
schedule of conference grid action.
Both will be trying to stay near
the top of the hectic Big Ten foot-
ball race which still has seven
teams in title contention. Both
squads received the only stain on
their record last week, Northwest-
ern losing to Iowa, 26-20, and Ohio
State held to a 7-7 tie with Wis-
consin~
Defense Challenged
The Buckeyes stout defense
faces a severe challenge from the
Wildcats versatile offense led by
sophomore quarterback Dick
Thornton. The Buckeyes, who have
relied mainly on their ground game
so far this year, may take to the
air in an effort to capitalize on a
supposedly weak Wildcat pass de-
f nse.
Northwestern, a one-touchdown
underdog, will be trying to win
their first game against Ohio State
since its 1948 Rose Bowl team won
21-7.

At East Lansing, the Spartans Minnesota, still seeking its first
of Michigan State will try to get win of the season, visits Indiana.
back on the winning column after The Gophers, riddled by injuries,
successive losses to Purdue and have only sophomores left in their
Illinois. The Spartan's opponentfi
in the nationally televised contest first three backfield units.
will be Wisconsin.
Faint Title Hopes ON THE I-3t SCENE:
The Badgers, who have been
beaten by Iowa and tied by Ohio
State in their last two contests,
will be trying to keep their faint
Big Ten title hopes alive.
Wisconsin will be led by quarter- Zoology demonstrated what an
back Dale Hackbart who not only effective weapon the forward pass
is a fine passer but possesses a can be when used properly. as
55-yd. average on four kickoff and they took to the air to crush Wil-
punt returns. His 64-yd. punt re- low Run 22-0 in an independent
turn last week gave Wisconsin its league game yesterday.
only touchdown in its tie with Ohio All Zoology touchdowns came on
State. AlZooytuhon aeo
Illinois and Purdue will be at passes as quarterback Jack Burch
Lafayette, both striving to aoid threw aerials to Bob Reinlert. Ken
a second conference defeat which Cummins and George Saunders.
would be fatal to either teams title After containing a heavier
chances. "1207" team all afternoon, a light
Illinois will match its passing Hawaiian line faltered on the last
combination of Bob Hickey and play of the game long enough for
Rich Kreitling against the run- their opponents to score a safety
ning of Boilermaker fullback Bob and win, 2-0.t
Jaris, who has scored eight of In other Independent League
Purdue's 14 touchdowns this fall. action, Evan's Scholars routed

Tennis Tryouts
Coach Bill Murphy of the
Michigan tennis team an-
nounced that tryouts for the
freshman squad will begin Mon-
day, Nov. 3 and last through
Nov. 14.
Sessions will be 'held daily in
the Sports' Building, 1 p.m. to
1207' WI n
Beantowners, 20-0, Business Ad
won in overtime, 1-0, and Air
Science whipped Chemistry, 20-6.
Bruce Hacket gathered in a de-
flected pass to score an overtime
period touchdown and give So-
ciology a 15-8 win over Cooley.
Other games saw Cooley whip
Printer's Devils, 12-8; Owen's Co-
op trip the Zips, 6-0; and Wesley-
ans nip University Terrace, 6-0,
on the virtue of a short TD pass
from Andy Carrigan to Tony
Gless.
Delta Tau Delta whipped Theta
Chi, 24-6, in the afternoon's
only "B" social fraternity game.

FLASHY IOWA HALFBACK-Bob Jeter, one of the Hawkeyes'
fleetest backs, and a fine pass receiver, will be closely watched
by Michigan defenders today.

LSU, Ole Miss Duel for Top Rating;
SAuburn, Oklahoma Streaks at Stake

t. 1

i
1

'F
i I,

C OME TO CrIJR ;CH

MICHIGAN
Prahst
Genyk
Callahan
Dickey
Marciniak
Deskins
W. Johnson
Ptacek
Harper
Julian
Sisinyak

L E
LT
L G
C
R G
R T
R E
Q B
L TI
R H
F B

IOWA
Merz
Burroughs
Grouwinkel
Lapham
Shipanik
Sawin
Nortonj
Duncan
Furlong
Jauch
Horn

By BILL ZOLLA
Louisiana State, the nation's
number one football power, stakes
its unbeaten and untied record on
the line, tonight, as the Tigers face
sixth-ranked Mississippi at Baton
Rouge, La.
Both teams, sporting identical
6-0-0 slates, squeaked by in last
week's games, obviously pointing
ahead for this clash. The victor of
this game becomes the odds-on
choice to capture the Southeastern
Conference title, and also to as-
sume the host position in the
Sugar Bowl on New Year's Day.
LSU will again rely on the flashy

running of All-America candidate
Billy Cannon. He's 205 pounds
and runs the 100 in :09.5
Toughest Game
Coach Johnny Vaught of Ole
Miss stated, "This will be my
toughest game since I became
coach here at Mississippi."
Considering that Vaught has
been the mentor for 10 years and
has played Georgia Tech, Texas,
and SMU in Bowl years, this says
quite a bit for LSU.
In another top flight Southeast-
ern contest, fourth-ranked Auburn
meets Florida in a battle of de-

)WANS WINLESS SINCE 1924:
Tradition Gives Wolverines Edge over Hawkeyes
- - - - - - - . _ _ _ _ _ _.

By FRED KATZ
Time was when Michigan
couldn't wait to take on Iowa's
gridders.
Through the years the Hawk-
eyes have proven themselves re-
liable "cousins" for the Wolverines,
bowing 15 times in the 19-game
series that dates back to 1900.
There have been two ties.
You have to blow the dust off
the record books clear back to
1924 to find out the last time Iowa
figured on top. The score that
year was 9-2.
Wolverine String
Since then Michigan and the
Hawks have played 14 times and
a Wolverine victory string has
been interrupted by two ties only.
The one-sided series that is
short as Michigan rivalries go has
run the gamut from humiliation
to heartbreak to utter frustration.
r In 1902 the Wolverines got
ample revenge for losing the
series' opener two years prior by
humbling Iowa byr a staggering
107-0 score.
But it has been the past five

years that have set players, Maddock connected on one TDI
coaches and fans from the "land pass to Kramer and then a few
where the tall corn grows" mut- minutes later hit Maentz good forI
tering among themselves.. six points and the ball game. Tony
In four of the five games played Branoff raced into the end zone
in that span Michigan has spotted seconds before the final gun for
its foe a two-touchdown first-half still one more tally. Final score:
lead. And yet the Wolverines con- Michigan 33, Iowa 21, for the wild-
tinued to add extra links to their est finish ever seen in Michigan
jinx over the Hawks. Stadium.

fenses. Auburn fields the top de-
fensive unit in the nation, yielding
an average of 108.6 yards-per-
game. The Tigers have also given
up only 22 points in their first five
games, winning four and tying
Georgia Tech, 7-7.
65-Game Streak
At Boulder, Colo., ninth-ranked
Colorado will attempt to end
Oklahoma's 65-game winning
streak in Big Eight competition.
In other top games across the
country, one-half of the Rose Bowl
cast should be decided when Cali-
fornia meets Oregon State; Army
is favored to roll over Colgateby
at least four touchdowns; Notre
Dame and Navy are rated even in
the top intersectional game of the
day,
Pittsburgh and Syracuse meet in
a struggle that could result in one
or more bowl offers for the winner.,
Texas Christian faces Baylor, and
Southern Methodist plays Texas
in the wide-open Southwest.
Soecer Club
Begins Trip
The Wolverine Soccer Club
leaves this morning for Delaware,
Ohio, to play Ohio Wesleyan, this
afternoon.
The team travels on to Gambier,
Ohio tomorrow where they will
meet the squad from Kenyon Col-
lege.
Next weekend the soccer team
goes on the road again, to play
Ohio .University in Athens, Ohio,
on Saturday. They travel to
Grand Rapids to play Calvin Col-
lege on Saturday, Nov. 15.
The team is carrying a squad of
fifteen players.

Overcame Deficits
In 1953 and 1954, Michigan
overcame 13-point deficits to pull
out 14-13 wins.
Michigan and Iowa students,
who thought they had seen the
ultimate in comebacks, were in
for even headier drama in 1955.
- Trailing 21-13 at the beginning
of the fourth quarter, the Wol-
verines appeared to be at the end
of the trail. A miracle was needed.
But instead of one came three,
in the hulking forms of Tom
Maentz and Ron Kramer, greatest
pair of ends in Maize and Blue
history, and Jim Maddock who
for three years pestered the Hawk-
eyes with his superb quarterback-
ing at strategic moments.

Same Old Story
It was the same old story in,
1956, although the loss was even
more painful to Iowa coach Forest
Evashevski and former Michigan
backfield great. A last - minute
touchdown brought Michigan a
17-14 victory and the Big Ten and
Rose Bowl's champion only loss
of the season.
But the supreme test of Michi-
gan's mastery over Iowa comes
today against the. again-unbeaten
and Rose Bowl bound visitors.
College Grid Scores
Georgetown 31, Miami (Ohio) 13
Vanderbilt 28, Miami, (Fla.) 15
Tulane 27, Texas Tech 0

ON

7dE

\ABr B''AT7 H

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
Sunday-9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. $Supper in honor of Lutheran
International Students,
Wednesday-7 :30 P.M. Vespers.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Englewood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M.; 6:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
RADIO: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
"Herald of Truth."
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00.
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "Christian Beliefs."
11:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
6:00 P.M. Supper clubs.
7:00 P.M. Speaker: Professor Kenneth Boulding.
8:00 P M. Bible Study and Interest Groups.
TUESDAY-
9:00 P.M. Coffee hour at Pat Pickett's apart-
ment, 217 S. Observatory.
FRIDAY-
6:00 P.M. Graduate supper,
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 A.M. "Enriched By Our Knowl-
edge. Of Christ,"
10:00 AM. Sunday School.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild and Youth Groups.
Evening Sermon: "The Promise of Christ's Return."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship: "Life's Meaning
Calls For Song," Dr. Merrill R. Abbey speaking.
Special Consecration Service for the Organ.
9:30 A.M. Discussion Group, "The Jigsaw Puzzle
of Christianity and Vocation."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
10:45 A.M. Sermon Topic: "The Re-creative Ex-
perience"-Miss Elizabeth Wright.
The Student Guild will meet tonight at the GUILD
HOUSE, 524 Thompson St. at 7:00 P.M. to
hear "Lost in the Stars" by Kurt Wiell and
Alan Paton.
Tuesday, Nov. 4
4:30-6:00 P.M. Coffee Break.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Worship Services, with
sermon by the pastor, "Students as Stewards."
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Panel discussion
on "Modern Images of Man."
Wednesday, 7:25-7:55: Matins Communion.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Father Richard Center.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
8:45 and 10:30 A.M. The Lord's Supper.
7:00 P.M. "The Holy Devil."
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest R. Kloudt, Minister
10:45 A.M. "Things To Think About" by Dr.
Arthur Krueger.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
1 1:00 A.M. "Everlasting Punishment" is the les-
son sermon.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Monday
11:00 A.M. Nto 8:30 P.M. Tuesday through
Saturday 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Sunday
2:30 P.M. to 4:30 P.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St
10:00 and 11:30 Meeting for worship.
10:00 Sunday school and college discussion.
11:30 Adult discussion.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends.

4

I

RAY JAUCH
,.. leading rusher

Do You, Think for Yourself?

TO KNOW MORE ABOUT
YOURSELF -ANSWER
THESE QUESTIONS!-*

{ -, , .

Do you try to keep from getting
angry because you feel that emotion
can interfere with your judgment?
Do you like to "show your stuff"
when you know you are really good
at something?
Can you honestly say you like to be
entirely independent of others ia
most things you do?,
In the morning, do you carefully'
choose a tie, matching jacket, etc.,
instead of grabbing the first thing
you see in the closet?,

YESF NO F
YESLi NO
YES 7jNO]
YES NO L

, " "
;, - t
-- ; yr
t, ,
;
, , ,
rh1
.' ___.J ..
-= =
,
f
, ; _ .
y.. " > 1-1
1 _ -f 3 .wt ; ,
i i-
s Ti ji I ,ti I ' f '' ,l

When you are criticized do you
V stop to analyze the criticism
before retorting?
Do you sometimes go to a public
event, such as a football game,
even if you have to go alone?
In a discussion, do you like to go
on record early with a definite
viewpoint of your own?.
Are you able to stay cheerful
even when you are alone for a
-n crtsn l - imm

YES NOD
YES LINO[
YES N OIY S IN

I
I

ow.

Do you ignore extravagant
claims and think for yourself
when making your choice of
filter cigarette?

YES NO

icvm siueruuie aiiue x

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Church School.
10:00 A.M. Adult Discussion Group-"How well
is integration working in Ann Arbor schools?"
-Harry Mial.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service-Sermon, "The Af-
fluent Society"--Edward H. Redman.
7:00 P.M. Student Group-Second in a series
of discussions on "Christianity and Morals"
led by Edward H. Redman. Transportation
provided.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Services 9:30, 11:00 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Instolla-
tion for Dr. Luchs. Dr. Roy Burkhart, Na-
tionally Known Preacher.
Bible Lecture 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Fred E. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL 9:30-10:40 and 10.:55-12:00
(crib through 9th grade),
STUDENT GUILD 7:00 at Guild House, 524
Thompson: "Lost in the Stars" by Kurt Wiell
and Alan Paton.

\ \.
\Y3
' \

The fact is, men and women who think for
themselves usually smoke VICEROY. Their

y ,

4

11

r

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan