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October 22, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

New Role for Helen

Constitution
Issue Left
To Electors
(Continued from Page 1)

FORMER 'U'-FUB TIE:
Value of Terminated Exchange Cited,

-Daly--Uary Mcivain
"HELENA'S HUSBAND"-Phillip Moeller's historical farce will be
the first of the experimental playbill series presented by the speech
department at 4 p.m. today in the Trueblood auditorium. Pictured
are Dianne Stolorov as Helena and Gordon Lapides as Paris in ~a
scene from the story of the abduction of Helen of Paris, arranged
by Menelaus to get rid. of his chattering wife. Albert Katz will
direct the free performance.
ANNUAL DINNER:
East Quad Holds Banquet
For S hon Facult
YMP I 77

By RICHARD CONDON
More than 290 students and 66
guests, including members of the
Boston Symphony and University
faculty, filed into the East Quad-
rangle dining rooms for the annual
Boston Symphony banquet-
University President Harlan
Hatcher along' with several of the
University deans were present at
the banquet. After dinner the
Hatchers were shown the East
Quad studio of WCBN where one
of the orchestra members was in-
terviewed for a campus broadcast.
Other orchestra members chat-
ted informally with the students
in the lounges.
Organizatton f
Notices
(Use of this column for an-
nouncements o, available to offi-
cially recognized and registered or-
ganizations only. Organizations
planning to be active for the cur-
rent semester should register.
Forms available, 2011 Student Acti-
vities Building.)
Ballet Club, Ballet & Jazz Lessons
Given, Oct. 22, 7:15-9:30 p.m., Barbour
Gym.
Chess Club, Regular Meeting, Oct. 22,
7:30 p m., Union, 3rd Floor.
Congregational & Disciples Guild,
Fre,,hman Discussion, Oct. 22, 7:00-8:00
p.m., 524 Thompson St.
y * * *
~Eastern Orthodox student Soc., nl-
lustrated tecture, Oct. 22, 8:00 p.m.,
Lane Hall. Speaker: Rev. A. Missiras,
pastor of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox
Church; "The Sacraments of the East-
ern Orthodox Church." Refreshments
following' lecture.
Graduate Student Coffee\ Hour, Oct.
22, 4:00-5:30 p.m., Rackham Bldg., 2nd
Floor-W. Lounge. All graduate stu-
dents invited.
Graduate Student Council, General
Meeting-election of additional mem-
bers of the Executive Board will be
held, Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m., Rackham Bldg.,
W. Conf. Rin.
* * *
I.S.A., Oct. 22, 7:45 p.m., Mich. League,
Hussey Rin. Debat "America Would
Endanger World Peace by Pursuing a
Policy of Defending Quemoy and Mat-
su.*
La Sociedad Hi1spanics, Tertulia, Oct.
22, 3:00-5:00 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Coffee & conversation. Everyone wel-
come.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Meeting, Oct.
22, 8:00 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Refresh-
ments & dancing afterwards;
Newman Club. Panel Discussion, Oct.
22, 8:00 p.m., Newman Club. "Academic
Freedom and Revealed Religion," mod-
erated by Prof. S Tonsor, History Dept.
Young Democrats, Oct. 22, 8:00 p.m.,
Union, Rm. 3G. Speakers: Mich. Sec.
of State James H. Hare and U.S. ,Con-
gressional Candidate Robert Hall,
"Failures. of the National & State Re-
publican Parties.'?

Harold Meek, a French horn
player voiced some objections to
stereophonic high fidelity. He said
that he dislikes the, ultra high
pitch of violins and other domi-
nating instruments as they are
presented on a stereophonic re-
cording.
Likes 'Distant' Recordings
His preference is for distant
recordings which "remind him less
of his work."
Meek explained that the orches-
tra has engagements the year
around except for ashort period
in the summer when he takes a
vacation from the world of music
on his farm in Ohio. The orchestra
entails constant traveling but he
says that he enjoys this.
The orchestra's most embar-
rassing moment came in Vienna
two years ago; he said. The train
carrying the orchestra's instru-
ments broke down en route to the
famous city. The audience waited
patiently for two hours for the
instruments to arrive and the con-
cert to begin.
Plays in Quartets
Meek plays in several concerts
with quartets each month as he
travels with the orchestra. He has
recorded a special record of the
development and the various
sounds of the .French horn.
He has collected 110 historic
instruments, each of which is a
forerunner of the present French
horn.
x ENDING TONIGHT
"ONE OF
THE FINEST
DRAMATIC FILMS-

deliberate schedule. The 102 mem-
bers of the convention will be
elected next April and will con-
vene in Lansing next September.
Vote on Proposals
Proposals resulting from their1
deliberations can be voted on by
the people in April 1960, providedE
the delegates complete their work
and adjourn 90 days before then.
If this deadline for submission
is not met, the delegates will
probably complete their work in
time for the November election of
1960. And a revised constitution"
adopted by the voters either in
April or November 1960 will take,
effect January 1, 1961.-
In organizing to meet this time-1
table, the delegates pass on the
qualifications and election returns
for their own members; choose
their own officers; decide upon]
their rules of order. It is likely
that they would divide up into'
committees to carry out their
tasks.
Committees Review Articles
the committees. would review
the constitutional articles as tewy
stand, sounding out the public's
views about improvements needed,
and then would recommend
changes to the entire convention.
This body decides as a whole'
what to put before the people and
how. Its recommendations can3
take the form of anew constitu-
tion or of amendmentscto the'
existing document.
The final decision rests with a
majority voting on the question
of adopting the proposed constitu-
tional' revision. Just as the pro-
position of revision may start,.
with the people in 1958, it has to
come back to them for final ac-
tion in 1960.
Walter Edits
Religious Book
"Religion and the State Univer-
sity," edited by Erich A. Walter,
assistant to University President
Harlan Hatcher, will be published
Octob'er 31 by the University of
Michigan Press.
The book, planned by the Cen-
tennial Commission of student re-
ligious work at the University, is
to be a manual of resource ma-
terial for all people interested with
the problem of religion in a state
university.
A group of experts composed of
a Catholic, a Protestant and a Jew
examine the religious question, and
leading educators deal with the
history and legal aspects of the
problem, discussing religion as a
way of knowing, with academic
freedom and with the role of
religion in the teaching of human-
ities, sciences and professions.
DIAL NO 2-2513
ENDING TONIGHT
If you've got
a sense of
humor (especially
about sex)
.DON'T MISS
MOON W .AZW WDUEO O
T!heMtchmker
SHIRLYBOM-lAG1IONY UK~N
%9IIRL[YMxLWN[-RUL FORD_

By JAN RAHM
"Attending the Free University
of Berlin gives one a chance for
self-directed methods of study,
because of the different ways a
German university is run," Rob-
ert Krohn, '60E, said.
Krohn attended the FUB last
year under the University-FUB
undergraduate exchange program.
This program was begun by the
two universities by the old Stu-
dent Legislature and was suspend-
ed in the spring of 1958 by the
Student Government Council be-
cause SGC felt the exchange was
not worthwhile.
Krohn said he felt that SGC
should continue ' the exchange
with the FUB because of the im-
portance of Berlin. He explained
that Berlin is the only place
where one can take a subway from
a democratic city into one run by
the Communists.
Location Fruitful
Strong political opinions, many
political-issues clubs and much
political conversation is the result
of this location, he said.
Krohn explained that students
at the FUB are generally very
serious and hard-working. He said
that about half of the students
are there on scholarships and
must work also.
"The work at the FUB is as
hard as one wants t make it,"
Krohn said. Normally there is only
one examination at the end of
four years in order to*get a de-
gree, but the scholarship students
now have to take exams at the
end of each semester so as to keep
the grants.
Lecture Courses Prominent
Most courses are l e c.t u r e
courses, with only a few subjects
like math having anything simi-
lar to our recitation classes. Ad-
vanced students frequently have
seminars comparable to the ones
in this country, Krohn explained.
There are no textbooks as such
for courses, Krohn said. He ex-
plained lecturers outline material
and give references, so students.
have good opportunitiest do re-
search and independent thinking
in their particular fields.
Because of the hard work the
students must do, there is not as
much school spirit there as there
is here, Krohn said. Church or-
ganizations are important and
World University Service is very
active in Berlin.
Well Versed in German
Krohn had the equivalent of
five semesters of German before
going to Berlin, and he explained

wnrm

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATER Inc.
Presents
"LAUGH PLAY OF THE YEAR"
OCT. 23, 24, 25
LYDIA MENDELSSOH N
CURTAIN 8 O'CLOCK
WIsT TO A -SMALL PLANET
OM IPL .Swo suss
"MODERN AS TODAY'S SAUCERS"
BOX OFFICE.OPEN DAILY 10 A.M. to Curtain
October 20 through 25
Admission-Thurs. $1.50 . . . Fri. and Sat. $1.65
Lydia Mendelssohn . . . Ph. Nq 8-6300
"See You At The League"
Season Tickets Available . . . $5.20 and $5.60
Ph. NO 2-4696

;

DEPT. OF SPEECH
presents.
THE FIRST IN A SERIES OF
FREE - EXPERIMENTAL
PLAYS
TODAY At 4:00
TRUEBLOOD AUD.
(FRIEZE BLDG.)

-Daily-Robert Kanner
BACK AT MICHIGAN - Following a year spent at the Free,
University of Berlin as part of an exchange program between{ the
two universities, Robert Krohn has returned to the University to
finish his studies in electrical engineering.

that after the first week or two
he had no trouble understanding
the lectures and reading the rec-
oimmended books.
Courses that he took were his
non-technical electives in such
subjects as German, history and
political science. He took four or
five courses a semester and spent
about 14 hours a week in lectures.
DIAL NO 8-6416
Ending Thursday
Daily at 7 and 9 P.M.
"DARING AND
SOPHISTICATED"
-N.Y. Daily News
THOMAS MANN'S intimate story
German Dialogue
English Subtitles

Krohn lived in a co-educational
home for foreign students run by
the FUB. Twelve students from
six countries were housed there,
along with two counselors and a
blind dog.

I

VMMCOMING
ON STAGE
IN PERSON
THURS., flt
OCT. 3 tI Ph:3
DON'T MISS ITS1
PULITZER PRIZE #
PLAY
N.Y. DRAMA
CRITICS AWARD
Box Office Priday
1 P.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Main Floor $3.50 - $4.00:
Bolc. ($3.00 - $2.50 sold out)
$2.00 - $1.50

PHILLIP MOEHLER'S
ONE-ACT FARCE
HELENA'S
HUSBAND
(ADMIS1IN FREE),

was"

I

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION
DEBATING AND DISCUSSION COMMITTEE
presentsa DEBATE on the motion
Resolved:. "America-Would Endanger.
World Peace by Pursuing a Policy of
Defending Ouemoy and Matsu"
MICHIGAN LEAGUE-HUSSEY ROOM

TONIGHT at 1:45

r

""''"

I1

#,

_ i

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

Invites

GRAD UATE STUD ENTS

OF OUR TIME!"
--Paul Beckley, N.Y. Her. Trib.
ONE OF THE GREAT ONES!
SIDNEY POlER
UNITED ARTSTS
Relesd thu
* Thursday *
"HARRY BLACK
AND THE TIGER"

I

in

I

Mathematics, Physics and Engineering

to On-Campus Interviews
October 20,21,and 22

Starting Thursday
DANNY KAYE
in
"Me And The Colonel"

PRESENTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
ANNOUNCES THAT A LIMITED NUMBER OF°
SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE STILL AVAILABLE.
THIS WEEK ONLY- THEATRE BOOTH CORNER
OF STATE STREET AND NORTH UNIVERSITY.
- OUTSTANDING PRODUCTIONS 5
Nov. 6-7-8 . . . AH, WILDERNESS !
Dec. 11-12-13 * . . THE MATCHMAKER
0A -... . - -

I

The Jniversity's Institute for Air Weapons Research has chal-
lenging positions in the study and analysis of weapons systems. The
studies integrate operational, technical, and scientific knowledge to oh
taro a mathematical model valid for quantative appraisal of the systems
effectiveness. The operations are an assignment from the Air Research
and Development Command, United States Air Force.
The opportunities for professional advancement and formal or
inf mnmn r lnad1n o ti n ar llp t

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11

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