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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 21, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tu'NT. mirc.TGA N bA T IV

t

1.111'i TAU AWa lt aaarU Pi a

...
..._

Ptacek

Sidelined

by

Swollen Ankle
Remains Doubtful Starter
For Homecoming Game

MEET ME
UNDER THE CLOCK
Weekends and the holidays
are so much more fun in
New York if you stop at
SThe Biltmore, traditional favorite
on every campus in the
country! Economical, too.
Write to our College Department
or special student and faculty
rates and reservations.
BILTMORE
Madison Avenue at 3rd St., N. Y. 17, N. Y.
AT GRAND CENTRAL STATION
Other REALTY HOTELS-The Barclay & Park Lane
Harry M. Anholt, President

ON THE I-M SCENE:
Cooley Tops Chicago, 6-0

L

SENIOR

MEN

By WAYNE MORTBERG
Cooley remained unbeaten in
"A" Residence Hall play by de-
feating Chicago, 6-0, on a pass
from Art Gnewuch to Dean Metz-
ger in a hard-fought game at
Wines Field yesterday.
Mike Bazany passed for the
touchdown and the extra points
to Roger Prelesnik as Greene de-
feated Hinsdale, 8-0. Huber, shut
out Reeves 16-0, as Mike Still-
wagon, Len Crauston and Chuck
Reeves scored touchdowns with
Crauston and Reeves contribut-
ing the extra points.
Scott Wins
In other "A" action Scott de-
feated Adams, 7-6 in overtime,
Taylor edged Lloyd, 8-6. Strauss
won a 12-0 victory over Hayden,
and Winchell took the measure
of Van Tyne 16-6.
"B" play was highlighted by
Gomberg's 40-6 victory over
Adams. Gomberg dominated the
play both offensively and defen-
sively, as their opponents were
unable to move the ball effective-
ly.
Harder Leads Reeves
Reeves defeated Winchell 14-8,
as Jim Harder skirted right end
for two touchdowns. Winchell was
led by the Grosslight brothers,
Les and Terry, who accounted for
all the points on passes.
Winchell desperately tried to
pass their way to victory behind
the tossing of the Grosslights but
Turks Win
In Soccer;
Top Arabs
Remaining in the ranks of the
unbeaten, Turkey shut out the
Arabs 14-0 in an I-M so'ccer league
battle Sunday at Wines Field.
In other circuit games, Latin
American down Thailand 3-1 with
the Canadiens rallying to topple
Korea, 4-3. The other league con-
test ended with a forfeit win by
the Internationals over India.
League play will resume next
Sunday at Wines Field with games
scheduled to begin at 2:15 and
3:30 pm. The league is co-spon-
sored by the I-M department and
the International Student Associ-
ation.

were stopped by the Reeves aerial
defenses.
Raffi Toroyan ran back an in-
tercepted pass for a touchdown as
Cooley conquered Hayden 14-6.
Dick Murphy scored the other
Cooley touchdown on a pass from
Bob Whitehouse. Ernie Byrd
passed to Bob McCartor for the
Hayden score.
Hinsdale Tops
A well-balanced Hinsdale team
defeated Van Tyne 20-12 behind
the excellent passing of quarter-
back Bob Peterhans, who also
scored two touchdowns. Chicago
scored a 6-0 victory over Michi-
gan on a touchdown, pass in over-
time.
Chuck Perry scored twice as
Kelsey won a 12-6, decision over
Huber. Allen-Rumsey used some
crisp blocking to good advantage
as they defeated Lloyd 24-0.
Ken Heller sparked Anderson
to a 10-6 yictory over Scott. In
the only other "B" game of the
day, Taylor defeated Strauss 8-0.

FOOTBALL DYNASTY:
Browns Top Pro Eastern Teams

-Daily-Robert Kanner
JINXED BY INJURY-Quarterback Bob Ptacek, shown in the
early minutes of the Northwestern game, is sidelined by a swollen
ankle. He remains a doubtful starter for/the Minnesota game on
Saturday.

By AL JONES
Daily Sports Editor
For the second straight week
Michigan's lame football team is
preparing for a game without the'
services of its top backfield man.
Last Monday fullback and cap-
tain John Herrnstein was declared
through for the season. Yesterday
the status of quarterback Bob Pta-
cak was still uncertain following
an ankle injury in the Northwest-
ern game.
May Be Ready
"There is a slight possibility that
he will be ready for Minnesota this
Saturday," Coach Bennie Ooster-
baan said. "But this is one of those
things you never know about. t
The ankle, which swelled up so
violently when injured, was at first
thought to be broken. Ptacek
wasn't able to walk on it Saturday,
and had to. be carried from the
field, and later had to use crutches
to move around.
Swelling Reduced
However, the swelling has gone
down rapidly, and with continual
treatments by trainer Jim Hunt
over the weekend, the ankle has
improved tremendously.
The rugged senior quarterback
attended practice yesterday in
street clothes, and walked with
only a slight limp. He conferred
with backfield coach Bump Elliott
and the first string backfield, and
then went in for another treat-
ment from Hunt.
Doubtful Starter
Team physician Dr. A. W. Coxan
also places Ptacek in the "doubt-
ful" category for competition
against Minnesota. It is simply a"
case of hoping and waiting.
Aside from Ptacek, the Michigan
injured list also added tackles
George Genyk and Willie Smith
after the game at Evanston.
Smith Sidelined
"Smith is out for this week at
least," Oosterbaan said. "He had
to play at half strength Saturday,
and his ankle is worse now than
it was last week."
Genyk, on the other hand,
should be ready this week. He
worked out yesterday, and, al-
though suffering from a pinched
enrve in the neck, is determined
to play.
Noskin Questionable
Perhaps the most discouraging.
thing in the Michigan camp is the.

Like to get in on the ground floor and stay there?
Sorry, we can't help you. But we do have lots of
room for first-rate seniors who want to get places
fast in the communications industry. Seniors with
a flair for science, engineering, business, account-
mg management and personnel work.
You can find out how you fit into this business
in Just one interview. See your Placement Coun-
selor now and arrange a visit with the Bell System
Recruiting Team. They'll be on campus toj talk'
with you on November 4 and 5.
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY
AMERICAN TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY
BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES
WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY
SANDIA CORPORATION

By AL SINAI
One of the most powerful clubs
in the National Football League
this year is the Cleveland Browns.
However, what is amazing about
this team is not the fact that they
are in first place in the Eastern
Division, but that seven of the
last eight years, they have won
divisional championships, and
three of those times they have
been world titleholders.
Top Old Conference
The Browns also made a sham-
bles of the All-American Football
Conference by winning four
straight titles before it merged
with the NFL in 1950. So, the com-
bined total for the New York
Yankees of football has been
eleven-titles in twelve years.
How do the Browns continually
manage to come up with top teams'
in a league where every team is
great and almost every player an
All-American?
Brown Leads Coaches
Most of the credit for the
Brown's tremendous record has to
go to a small, intense man named
Paul Brown. His coaching career
dates back to 1930.
Although his official position
with Cleveland is that of coach
and general manager, he might as
well be president for he is mainly
Dawkins Set
For Pitt Game
WEST POINT, N. Y. OP)-Half-
back Pete Dawkins, Army's lead-
ing scorer, probably will be ready
for the Pitt game Saturday, but
fullback Harry Walters apparent-
ly is lost to the team for at least
a week.
Dawkins, of Royal Oak, Mich.,
pulled a thigh muscle and Walters
sprained his left ankle in Satur-
day's victory over Virginia.

responsible for Cleveland's
position in football today.
Headed Massilon

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

lofty

Brown was born in Norwalk,
Ohio, in 1908, but his family moved
to Masilon when he was twelve
years old. He played quarterback
for the Massilon Tigers, and then
moved on to Ohio State University.
Since he was, too light for Big
Ten football and because he
wanted to play, Brown transferred
to Miami University of Ohio.
There, he played quarterback
until he took a coaching job with
Severn, a prep school for the U. S.
Naval Academy. In two years
Severn won 16, and lost 1. Brown
had already begun to show the,
ability which has made him the
best coach in football.
Mentor at OSU
From Severn, Brown returned
to his high school, Masilon, where
he coached for nine years. He
compiled an amazing record of 81
won, 7 lost, and two tied. In one
six-year stretch, Brown's teams
won 58 out of 60 games.
From 1941-43, Brown coached at
Ohio State. University, then en-
listed in the Navy. He was ap-
pointed athletic director at Great
Lakes where he coached football.
Browns Gain Franchise
During the coach's Navy days,
the All-America Pro Conference
was formed. Cleveland Was granted
a franchise and persuaded Brown
to coach them when he was dis-
charged from the Navy.
"I'll try to build a football dy-
nasty at Cleveland," was Brown's
cryptic comment, when asked if
he could move from college (foot-
ball to a pro team in the organiza-
tional stage.
Brown has obviously succeeded,
as his Brown have compiled a
record of 128 victories, 30 losses,
and 5 ties in twelve years. In that
time, Cleveland, has outscored its
opponents 3,909-2,03 0.
-"- 1i

PAUL BROWN
... champion's coach

TEAMMATES-Young engineer Warren Conner-B.S.M.E. 1956-teams up with Armand J. Bilitzke
of GM Engineering Staff's Transmission Development Group to test blade-shape models for torque
converters. Mr. Bilitike helped design flow table which is unique to the automotive industry.

fact that few of those injured
earlier in the season have re-
covered fully.
Second-string quarterback Stan
Noskin, who was unable to play
last week at Northwestern is still
a question mark. He worked with
the squad yesterday, but was all
taped up and still can't run or
pass effectively.
Seek Depth
"He should be ready for the
Gophers," Oosterbaan stated, "but
I have to play it safe. We have
brought up Don Hannah, a sopho-
more, from the reserves to bolster
John Spidel and Jim Sytek." This
will giye the needed depth it
Ptacek'and Noskin can't play.
Another serious problem is at
right halfback, where the first
three men are injured. Fred Julian,
the starter, has a bad bruise on the
hip, while Al Groce and Gary Mc-
Nitt have leg and foot injuries that
put them only at half strength.
Shift Halfbacks
Oosterbaan stated that he would
run Brad Myers and Reid Bushong,
both left halfbacks who have
played both positions during the
early season practices, at the right
slot during practice this week.
"Julian is a rugged boy who
says that he will be ready, but I
will feel safer if I can use Myers
or Bushong as alternates. They
will give us security at both pos1
tions," Oosterbaan said.
Jobson Out
The last severe injury that still
plagues the Michigan coaching'
staff if that to Tom Jobson. A
wrenched knee, which kept him
out of the Northwestern game, will
apparently sideline the husky
sophomore guard for at least an-
other week.
The only bright spot at practice
this week is the return of Jim
Byers, who was sidelined with an
injured ' knee before the season
started. Then a center, he has now
been returned to fullback, which,
he played last year. Whether his
knee will permit him to play Sat-
urday is not yet certain.
Byers should provide more punch
at fullback, where the Wolverines
are weak with the loss of Herrn-
stein. Junior. Tony Rio is a rugged
man for 188 pounds, but too light
for the hard drives through the
middle.
Byers is an outstanding line.
backer, and should help out on de-
fense. Rio has served well on de-
fense, too, but has been forced to
play almost the full game since
Herrnstein has been injured.
Much of the outcome of the
Minnesota game this Saturday
will rest on these injured players.
If the majority of them recover,
Oosterbaan will be able to field a
team with victory chances, if not
the outcome may be disastrous.
4X' Sailors
iMeet
In Madison
Michigan's Sailing Club notched
its third victory in four starts,
Saturday, in the meet at Madison,
Wis.
The race, held on Lake Mendota,
was divided into two sections, A
and B, both of which were cap-
tured by Michigan. The A team,
captained by Dexter Thede, totaled
50 points, while the B team, led
by Otto Scherer, scored 45.
The A squad was crewed by Dlek
Scheinberg and Toivo Tagamets
was second-in-command o the B
team.
Second to Michigan's 95 points
was Wisconsin with 89. Notre
Dame was third with 82, followed.
by Cincinnati, 70; Wayne, 55;
Washington University of St.
Louis, 43; and Marquette, 34.
Michigan is favored in the next
meet at Purdue this Saturday.

I -- __ _

lGRID SELECTIONS
For the second straight week upsets highlighted the collegiate
grid scene, with the result that most of the Grid Pick contestants
had a dismal week.
The winner, Bob Logan, 4 Cooley, East Quad, came through with
flying colors and managed' to pick 14 of the 20 games correctly. In
contrast the best record on the Daily Sports Staff was 12-8. Many
of the entrants fell below the 50 per cent mark.
Two ties and upset victories by Northwestern, Tulane, Purdue,
Iowa, California, Harvard, William and Mary aid Washington State
led to the downfall of most of the prognosticators.
This week's contest is open for entries starting today and you
can be sure most contestants will stop and think about the under-
dogs before circling their choices.
To enter Grid Picks all you have to do Is clip the list of games
printed below out of The Daily, circle your selections, predict the
score of the Minnesota-Michigan game and send the entry to: Grid
Picks, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor.
The winner of the contest will receive two tickets to the Michigan
theater which will be good any time next week. Entries are also
available at The Daily, the contest closes midnight Friday and each
contestant is allowed only one entry.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

'r

--

Inquiring t
Minds

A General Motors Representative
will be on campus
to answer questions about
job opportunities with GM on

I

No matter where your interests lie in the vast
field of engineering, there's a better-than-good
chance you'll find your place in the sun with
one of the 35 Divisions of General Motors.
For these GM Divisions run the gamut of vir-
tually every field of engineering and science
1-from engineering, designing and producing
automobiles, trucks and hundreds of impor.
tant industrial products to helping to solve the
unknown challenges of the Space Age.
Choosing an engineering career with GM

October 22, 23 or 24
near Detroit, equipped with every conceivable
research facility.
Best of all, it means a future as big as you
want to make it at GM's 35 Divisions and 126
plants in 71 cities and 19 states. A future in
which your training, your inventive ability,
your inquiring mind, your desire to get ahead
will receive quick recognition and unlimited
opportunities.
You owe it to yourself to investigate the kind
of future General Motors is offering young
-- ----t 4 O - a.a reilw.a ..- L L-fiN

BEHIND THE BALL
because of cleaning bills?
Save 25% on our
Budget Plan
by leaving Dry Cleaning 7 days.
One-day Service at REGULAR prices.

1.
2.
3 .
4.
5.
7.
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9.
10.

Minn. at Michigan (score)
Michigan St. at Illinois
Wisconsin at Ohio State
Northwestern at Iowa
Notre Dame at Purdue
Miami (0) at Indiana
Army at Pittsburgh
Dartmouth at Harvard
Mississippi at Arkansas
Alabama at Mississippi St.

For your convenience, in Ann Arbor call:
TRAVEL BUREAU, INC.
NO 2-5587
For all Airline Reservations
1313 South University
N E VER A S ER V ICE C HA RG E

11. Oregon at California,
12. N. Carolina St. at Duke
13. Georgia Tech at SMU'
14. N. Carolina at Wake Forest
15. Kansas St. at Oklahoma
16. Washington at Oregon St.
17. Syracuse at Penn State
18. Southern Cal. at Wash. St.
19. Stanford at UCLA
20. Tulane at Kansas

Keep On Your
Toes With
Now that you've got yourself
into college, let safe, handy

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