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October 18, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t
E MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY,

hickigan, orthwestern Play at Evanston

oda

'M' Rules Slim Favorite
Despite NU's Perfect Mark

FACE VIRGINIA, TULANE:

Army,
By AL SINAI

Navy To Place Streaks on Line

(Continued from Page 1)
varsity have operated solely under
his tutelage, and this sophomore
squad is the first class that received
the benefits of his recruiting.,
If the present record is any indi-
cation -Big Ten coaches better
take note of Northwestern in the
future.
Three Stars
The three Wildcats that Michi-
gan must fear the most present a
varied and speedy offensive threat.
Halfbacks Wilmer Fowler - Big
Ten sprint champion in the 100-
and 220-yard dashes - and Ron
Burton are the fastest backfield
pair in the Conference.
Perhaps the real secret to the
Northwestern success, however, is
sophomore quarterback Dick
Thornton. Michigan scout Don
Dufek, who has watched the last
two Wildcat victories, has much
praise for the Chicago yearling,
"Triple Threat"
Thornton is a triple threat man,
who does all of the passing and
kicking, and is a great runner,"'
Dufek says. "He is really danger-
ous when he rolls out on the option,
because he can both run and pass
effectively.
"His spirited play and signal
calling is what really makes the
difference between this year's and
last-year's Northwestern teams."
The fourth man in the Wildcat
backfield is fullback Mark Johns-
ton, who has just recovered from
an injured knee. His powerful run-
ning, which wasn't missed in
Northwestern's conquest of Min-
nesota last week, will be back to
plague the Wolverines.
All Are Well
Fowler was also slowed by a leg
ailment earlier in the season, but
he-like the entire NU squads
healed now.
Despite the season record of the.
Wildcats, and the fact that they
are rated higher than Michigan in
the weekly polls, the Wolverines

are rated a six-point favorite by
the "experts."
Michigan will have to try to live
up to this faith without the full
services of five players. Tackle
Willie Smith, halfback Gary Mc-
Nitt, and quarterback Stan Noskin
are all injured and cannot be ex-
pected to perform to full capacity.
Guard Tom Jobson didn't make the
trip. All are second stringers.
No Herrnstein
This will be the first game that
Michigan has not had the services
of Captain John Herrnstein at
least at the beginning. Out for the
season now, the rugged fulback
will be greatly missed on offense
and defense.
Filling in for him again will be
Tony Rio, who has played much
of the time this year and last when
Herrnstein has been injured. It
will be his first starting role for
the Chicago junior, however.
All of the rest of the Michigan
starters will be the same as in
previous games.
Battle of Lines

Military disciplIne must do
some good since two of the na-
tion's top college teams are Army
and Navy, ranked number one, and
six, respectively.
Army, with its best postwar
team, meets Virginia today, while
Navy takes on Tulane. The Ca-
dets' Pete Dawkins leads the na-
tion in scoring with 42 points,
while Navy's quarterback Joe
Tranchini continues to play top-
notch ball.
Tranchini Led Win
Tranchini manipulated Navy's
tricky winged-T attack agains
Michigan last week to lead the
men from Annapolis to a 20-14
win. Navy, however, still will be
without the services of potential
All-America tackle Bob Rief-
snydera
In the Southwest, surprising
Texas, fresh from a 15-14 win
over Oklahoma, takes on Arkan-

sas in a game that the unbeaten
Aggies should have little trouble
in winning.
Three of the nation's top ten,
teams are found in the South,
where Auburn meets Georgia
Tech, Mississippi plays Hardin-
Simmons ,and surprising Louisi-
ana State takes on Kentucky.
Top Defense
Auburn leads the nation in de-i
fense, having allowed only 81
yards in rushing per game. They
haven't scored much, but judging

by their record, neither have the
opposition.
Louisiana State, unbeaten this
season, pounded Miami for a 41-0
victory last Saturday in the sur-
prise of the week. The Tigers have
developed a fine passing game to
go along with their fine runners,
such as halfback Billy Cannon.
Unbeaten College of Pacific, led
by the nation's leading ground
gainer, Dick Bass, will try to ex-
tend their string against Cincin-
nati. Bass has gained 614 total

yards this season, 562 by rushing,
and 52 on passing. He is averag-
ing 10.6 yards per carry.
Clemson, who just managed to
defeat Vanderbilt, 12-7, in their
last game, will be idle until next
Thursday when they take on
South Carolina.
Out West, dazzling California
quarterback Joe Kapp will at-
tempt to put on another show
with his fine ball-handling and
passing as the Bears meet USC,
who lost 25-0 to Oregon last Sat-
urday.

-- - - - - --- -

-Daily-David Arnold
WOLVERINE TOUCHDOWN-Tony Rio (37) scores first TD for
Michigan against Navy last week. Rio, an 185-lb. fullback, will
appear in the starting lineup against Northwestern today due to
injury suffered by John Herrnstein.

COME !TOJCHRCH; r

This game could well be decided
completely in the line. Both Michi-
gan's and Northwestern's forward
walls have outplayed all comers
thus far, and have shown great
spirit. The big question is which
will give in to the other this after-
noon.
Oosterbaan's biggest worry is
again the defensive backfield.
Thornton's passing and Fowler and
Burton's running afford the Michi-
gan mentor good cause to worry.
The Wolverines have been poor on
pass defense, and the 'M' backfield
doesn't have speed that compares
with the Wildcat halfbacks.
Flashy Offenses
Both teamsshould again show
the flashy offenses that they have
previously unveiled. Michigan, al-
though without Herrnstein's rug-
ged line plunges and Noskin's pass-
ing ability hampered by injury,
will still have Bob Ptacek calling
signals and the running ability of
three proven halfbacks - Brad
Myers, Fred Julian and Darrell,
Harper.
Northwestern, with Thornton
directing the attack, should be
equally dangerous -- especially,
aided by the speed advantage.
This game is almost a must for
Michigan if Oosterbaan and his
squad have any designs on a high
finish in the Big Ten. Northwest-
ern-undefeated and dangerous-
ranks as only the fifth best team
in the Conference.
There will, obviously, be much
harder games ahead. Michigan will
have to start things off right this
afternoon, or accept a bleak fu-
ture.
I TODAY'S LINEUP

Iowa-Wisconsin Heads Big Ten Bill;
MSU Meets Old Nemesis Purdue

ON

tI7HE

\SAB BAT 3 r

By TOM WITECKI
Iowa and Wisconsin, top con-
ference contenders and prime can-
didates for a winter. junket to
Pasadena, meet today to feature
a full round of action on the Big
Ten grid card.
The two unbeaten powerhouses
will face off in Wisconsin's Camp
Randall Stadium before a sell-
out crowd of 63,710 and a regional
television audience. Both squads
have a conference win to their
credit, Wisconsin whipping Pur-
due, 31-6, and 'Iowa shellack~ing
Indiana, 34-13.
The contest will also feature a
duel between two of the Big Ten's
best quarterbacks, Wisconsin's
Dale Hackbart and Iowa's Randy
Duncan.
The Badgers, with 11 lettermen
in the starting lineup and a ten-
lb. per man weight advantage, are
rated one-touchdown favorites over
Forest Evashevski's Hawkeyes.
This is the first of three crucial
games for the Badgers who are
seeking their first undisputed Big
Ten football crown since 1912. If
they can win today and the next
two weeks against Michigan State
and Ohio State; they will be well
on their way to the title and Cali-
fornia's roses.
MSU Meets Jinx
At Lafayette, once-tied Michi-
gan State takes on their jinx team,
the Boilermakers of Purdue, who
have lost their lone Big Ten con-
test..
The Spartans are 15-point fa-
vorites to overwhelm the Boiler-
makers, but Purdue fans aren't
forgetting the fact that their team
has upset the Spartans three times
in-the past five years.
Last year Jack Mollenkopf's
squad handed Michigan State its
only defeat, a 20-13 decision which'
cost the Spartans a share of the
Big Ten title.
However, Coach Duffy Daugh-
erty this year is, expected to have

his team "up" for the game and
the home crowd of 50,000 may be
in fora long afternoon. Back in
the starting lineup for Michigan
State will be halfback Art John-
son who suffered multiple face in-
juries in last week's game against
Pittsburgh.
OSU Favored
At Columbus, Ohio State's big
and brawny Buckeyes are three-
touchdown favorites to whip un-
dermanned Indiana.
The defending Big Ten cham-
pions are loaded withrpower at
every position and threaten to
make the game a runaway. Half-
back Don Clark, who gained 108
yds. rushing against Illinois last
Kipke Enters
Grid Shrine.
Harry Kipke, former Michigan
All-American halfback and coach,
was one of nine new members
added Thursday to the Football
Hall of Fame.
The group will be honored at a
dinner Oct. 28 at which President
Eisenhower will also be present.
The addition of these nine foot-
ball greats brings to 162 (116 play-
ers, 46 coaches) the men who
have been named to the Hall of
Fame, the building for which is
to be erected on the Rutgers Uni-
versity campus, also the birth-
place of football.
Kipke is considered the greatest
punter in Michigan history and
was named the country's out-
standing player in 1922. As a,
coach, his team won four Big Ten
titles and one national champion-
ship.
Other men named were: Charles
Barrett, David Campbell, Thomas
Jones, all deceased; Marshall
Goldberg, Francis Lund, Frank
Schwab, Harry Stuhldreher and
Harry Killinger.
In addition to being present at
the annual dinner on Oct. 28, the
six living inductees will appear
tomorrow night on the Ed Sullivan
Show over CBS and on Monday
noon at the weekly luncheon of
the Football Writers Association of
New York at Toots Shor's.

week, will lead the ground-con-
suming Ohio State attack.
An added attraction at the game
will be Ohio State Coach Woody
Hayes who has been making head-
lines the past week with his "dirty
football" accusations.
At Minneapolis there will be a
battle between two of the Big
Ten have-nots. Illinois and Minne-
sota, conference grid powers in
recent years, will both be seeking
their first win of the season.
Illinois rules a slight favorite
since it has looked more impres-
sive in its three defeats than
Minnesota has in a similar num-
ber of losses.
TODAY-
ALL DAY
3rd ANNUAL
CAMERAMA
Many, Many Specials
and Sale Items
FFREE GIFTS
To Be Given Away
ANN ARBOR'S
BIGGEST ANNUAL.
PHOTOGRAPHIC
EVENT!

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND THE
EPISCOPAL ,STUDENT
FOUNDATION'
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.-Holy Communion and Sermon for
students, followed by breakfast and discussion
in Canterbury House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:00 P.M. Graduate Canterbury in Parish House
Library.,
5:30 P.M. Canterbury, Buffet Supper:
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer and commentary.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
10:00 A.M. ChurchSchool.
10:00 A.M. Adult Discussion Group-"Improving
the Curriculum for the Michigan Schools,"
Baden Miles speaking.
11:00, A.M. Service of Worship--Sermon "We-
the Church/' Edward H. Redman speaking.
7:0 P.M. Student Group-"On the Constitu-
tonality of the New Laws Designed to Avoid
Integration by Southern Legislatures." Speaker,
Professor Samuel Estep. Transportation pro-
vided.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "'Too Busy' for
the Kingdom of God?"
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, . Supper & Program. Open Forum on
Questions pertaining to Christianity and Sci-
enice.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. Dr. Med Stonehouse will speak to the
combined adult classes.
10:30 A.M. "The Lord's Prayer. V Forgive Us Our
Sins."
7:00 P.M. "The Epistle to the Philippians. XVIII
The Ability to Face Life."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 A.M. "The Purpose of Predesti-
nation."
J1 0 :00 A.M. Sunday School.,
5:45 P.M. Student Guild and Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service. Sermon, "That Bless-
ed Hope."
WE WELCOME YOU!
FIRST BAPTISTCHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs. Gabrielle Bublitz, Assistant Student Coun-
sellor
Student Class, 9:45-Introduction to the New
Testament-IlCorinthians.
Worship Service, 11 :00-Laymen Sunday: speak-
ers-Supt. Jack Elzay and Mr. Carl Doman.
6:45 P.M. Roger Williams Guild. "Every Chris-,
tain's Social Responsibility"-Speaker: Prof.
William Schlatter of the Department of Busi-
ness Administration and active layman in the
First Presbyterian Church of Ann Arbor.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
'REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernet R. Kloudt Minister
10:45 A.M. Worship Sevice-"God is Calling
You," Rev. Ernest R. Kloudt, preaching.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.

6

. "

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Services: 9:30-10:20:; and 11:00-12:00 "THE
BLOT"-Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, Campus Min-
ister. Bible Lectlure '10:20-10:40, Mrs. Fred
E. Luchs.
CHURCH SCHOOL hds two complete sessions, ages
crib-9th grade. 9:30-10:40 and 10:55-12.00.
Student Guild 7:00 P.M. "The World is Yours-
Help Shape It." Richard Burlingame.

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meoting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Adult Study Class.
11:30 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
7:15 A.M. Prof. Kenneth Bouldinig: "Life
George Fox."'

...
f



of

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship:. "Too Spiritual
To 'Be True," Dr. Merril R. Abbey predching,
9:30A.M. Discussion Group, "The Jigsaw Puzzle
of Christianity and Vocation.'
7:00 P.M. Rev. and Mrs. David Church, "What
Does Ecumenical Mean?"

!'

MICHIGAN
G. Pfahst
G. Genyk
Callahan
J. Dickey
Marciniak
D. Deskinsr
W. Johnson
B. Ptacek
B. Myers
F. Julian
T. Rio

N'WESTERN
LE Kimbrough
LT A. Cvercko,
LG J. Abbatiello'
C J. Andreotti
R6 R. Asala
RT G. Gossage
RE Doug Asad
QB D. Thornton
LH R. Burton
R H. W. Fowler
FB M. Stock

BRAD MYERS
... sparks "M" attack

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director"'
Robert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY---
Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00, Dr. Kur-
zengo preaching.
10:30 A.M. Seminar, "Christian Beliefs."
1 1:30 A.M. Coffee Hour.
6:00 P.M. Supper Clubs.
7:00 P.M. "By Faith Alone - is Goodnrss
Enough?" Pat Pickett speaking.
8:00 P.M. Bible Study and Interest Groups.
TUESDAY-
Fellowship Luncheons with Internotional stu-
dents at Lane Hall 12:00.
9:30 P.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's apart- -
ment, 217 S. Observatory. All Welcome!
WEDNESDAY-
Midweek worship at Congregational Church
4:15 P.M.
THURSDAY -
International teas at international center.
FRIDAY - s r P
GraduateW supper 6:15 P.M.

ON THE I-M SCENE:
Bus Ad Beats Philosophy, 18-0

DON'T MISS IT
till 9:00 tonei
THE Olfigi
320 South State

tressed in pink T-shirts and
king very professional for their
ependent League I-M action,
siness Administration turned on
steam in the second half of
ir game with Philosophy to
, 18-0.
d Conners led the Bus Ad team
victory as he scored their first
chdown, passed to Don Riedel
the second, and then tossed to
ug Hayes for the third. All of
victor's points were scored in
second half.
Buckeyes Romp
'he Buckeyes romped to a 16-0
over 1207 with Dale Keller
thing one pass for a touch-
in and throwing to Rudd Van
ne for the other. Keller also
ied an extra point and passed
Don Krupman for the other two
ater.
oth Willow Run and Economics
:e a single touchdown stand up
they defeated Cooley and,
(logy, respectively, 6-0, and 8-0.

Willow Run scored its touch-
down late in the game on a pass
from Dick Legault to John Pen-
quite, while Economics scored
early on a toss from southpaw
Hal Demsetz to Hugh Patrick.
Demsetz threw a bullet to Al
Winger for the extra point.
Scholars Win
An Evans Scholars double pass
from Norb Capistrant to Mike
Malsnowski and then* to Dick
Gates covered 30 yards against
Wesleyan and sent the game into
overtime which Evans Scholars
finally won, 7-6.
C.M.S. won a closely fought bat-
tle. from Cooley Elders, 8-6, in a
game interrupted by many pen-
alties. John Griep passed to Joe
DeCook for a touchdown, and then
to John DeVries for the tivo points
that won the game for C.M.S.
In other games, Theta Delta
Chi beat Trigon, 6-0, Terrace won
over Pioneers, 12-0, Acacia de-
feated Triangle on a forfeit, Air
!! R

Science ripped Psychology, 30-0,
Hawaiian won over Actuaries, 6-0,
and Kitchen Keepers beat Print-
er's Devils, 26-0.

I

rS

FUNDAMENTAL BAPTIST CHURCH
IOOF Hall, 326 W. Liberty
Lyman Simpson of Grand Rapids will be the speak-
er for both services.
Sunday School 10:00 A.M. Church 11:00 A.M.
and 7:30 P.M.
Message "The Cross"--Frank Schultz, Pastor.
Evening Message by.,Edward Byron.
ayer Meeting-Thursday 7:30 P.M.
Frank Shultz, GE 7-5490, Edward Byron, GE 8-
4881, Galilean Baptist Mission.
A crossless life means a crownless death.

I

You are invited
Mr. Jack Schilling, factory represen-
tative, will demonstrate the features
of HUSH PUPPIES on our new SHOE
MEZZANINE today,

They're water repellent !;
Cleanable with sandpaper,
eraser or soap and water.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL,
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Father Richard Centel.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan 'Streets
Rev. Russell M. FullerMinister}
10:45. A.M. Morning Wor ship, Robert Rikkers,

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.

a
f '

MR. JACK SCHILLING

TONIGHT...9 till 12

Brushed Pigskin.
HUSH PUPPIES

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "Doctrine of Atonement," is the les-.
son sermon.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Monday
11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday through
Saturday 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Sunday
2:30 P.M. to 4-:30 P.M.'

{I

GRADUATE MIXER

by Wolverine

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