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September 15, 1958 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PRESENTATION BEGUN IN 1894:
May Festival Features Well-Known Musical Artists in Six Concerts

EVERY SATURDAY-An important part 'of football Saturdays is the University Marching Band.
Precision marching, intricate dance steps and elaborate formations as well as fine playing have
characterized the band. It Is one of three bands at the University.
Unversit as Three Bands

May Festival, a series of six con-
certs presented in Ann Arbor each
spring, draws musical artists from
many parts of the world.
These concerts represent the'
culmination of a definite program
of concerts presented throughout
the season under the auspices of
the University Musical Society..
The first annual May Festival
was inaugurated in 'the spring of
1894 under the leadership of Prof.
Albert A. Stanley, musical director,
U' B aroque
Trio Unique
"The University is the only such
institution I knov of that has a
regularly sponsored organization
to present music of this type,"
commented Prof. Florian Mueller
of the music school.
The Baroque trio, a University
organization since 1955, is com-
posed of Prof. Mueller who plays
the oboe, Prof. Nelson Hauenstein,
flute, and Prof. Marilyn Mason
Brown, harpsicord. All are in the
music school.
Specializing in music from 1600
to 1750, the group plays composi-
tions of the Baroque period of
music which ends with the death
of Bach.
The playing of much of this
music has been neglected and
many pieces only now are being
made available," Prof. Mueller
said. "For example, one composi-
tion which we have played was
printed in 1740. We had to have a
photostatic copy made of the re-
c ently found music."
The trio presents a concert in
Ann Arbor each semester and
plays engagements throughout the
state.
In Detroit last fall the trio and
the Woodwind Quintet played a
special reception for the French
ambassador.

and his associates on the Board of
Directors. Three concerts were
played by the Boston Festival Or-
chestra, directed by Emil Kollen-
hauer. The Choral Union Chorus
with a membership of about 300
sang in the final concert with
soloists from New York.
This was the first large musical
event to be held in this area, and

Festival since 1913, was in its
early days, referred to by such dis-
tinguished musicians as Ignace
Jan Paderewski as "the finest
music hall in the world."
The May Festival concerts, as
well as all the other musical pre-
sentations during the year, are
planned for more than the enjoy-
ment and entertainment of Uni-
versity students and local and
state residents. They are intended
also to appropriately supplement
the academic' and professional re-
sources of the University, the Uni-
versity Musical Society says.
Artists Appear
Appearing on the program this
spring were the noted artists Lily
Pons, soprano of the Metropolitan
and Paris Operas, Claramae Turn-
er, contralto; Brian Sullivan,
tenor; Martial Singher, baritone;
Yi-Kwei Sze, bass-baritone.

Gyorgy Sandor, Hungarian pian-
ist accompanied the Festival Youth
Chorus which is composed' of 400
singers from the Ann Arbor Public
Schools.

E

George London, baritone, Mi- J tries.

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chael Rabin, violinist and Glen
Gould, pianist were also feature
as part of the Festival. Many o
these artists are famous for par
in operas. They all have toure
the United States and other coun

V

or ┬žlaI and I iner

Stepping ..off at 220 steps perv
minute each fall is the Univer-
ity's Marching Band.
' The Michigan Marching Band
takes the spotlight for the first
eight weeks of each fall semester.
Under the direction of Prof. Wil-
lam Revelli, the band has estab-
lished a reputation for unusually
fine playing, precision marching,
and intricate dance steps, forma-
tions, and gridiron productions.
The practice that the band
members go through requires
enough steps to equal the distance
of a little over once around they
world. The 170, band members
spend about seven hours drilling
on each show and manage to lose
800- poundsin eight weeks..
Director Since 1935
Prof. evelli assumed the duties
of director of University Bands
in 1935. The band performs at all
home football games and also ac-
companies the team on out of
town games.
With the close of the football
season the University Symphony
Band takes over the spot}ight.
The Symphony Band requires a
high degree of musical proficiency,
since members read ,and perform
the finest of symphonic litera-
ture. Often the band premiers new
works for a composer under his
direction.
The 'spring tour climaxes each
symphony season. Band medibers
receive a real exposure to "being
on the road."
Symphony Band has played in
tJ
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Carnegie Hall, Philadelphia Aca- bands,
demy of Music,' and Symphony rected
Hall in Boston during recent der, a
years. Students have gained pro- sity Ba
fessionai training and experience
on the.concert stage. Univ
The third part of the University Prof.7
Band lineup is the Wolverine studen
Band. The Wolverine Band's ac- uablet
tivities center around extra cur- music
ricular campus functions such as Actu
basketball games and local pa- trainin
rades. The Band takes over the particij
marching role of the Marching music+
Band at the close of the latter's tistry.
season. Univ
Primarily for students without been c
the proficiency to qualify for tlhe ers of t
Symphony Band or for' those who student
cannot devote the time required and a
for participation in the other world.

the Wolverine Band is di-
by Prof. George R. Caven-
ssistant director of Univer-
ands.
Training Ground
versity Bands, according to
Revelli, are to encourage
it talent and serve as a val-
training ground for future
educators.
al practice in organization,
g and presentation provide
pants with experience in
education, culture, and ar-
ersity Bands have always
onsidered among the lead-
the nation's bands. Not only
ts and alumni but critics
audiences throughout the
have acclaimed them.

LiLY PONS
... opened Festival
music lovers from all over Michi-
gan and surrounding states were
in the audience of the old Uni-
versity Hall.

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