100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1958

TWO

11ME MICHIGAN DAILY

T

TWfl THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 19~S

-- -- I m

Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at BARGAIN PRICES
New Books If You Prefer

FALL PLAYBILL SUCCESSFUL:
Speech Department Plays Near Sellout

OLL
STATE STREET oft

H UNIVERSITY ,

"A Major Event of the Dance Season ....A Must!"
JOHN MARTIN, NEW YORK TIMES

THE RANK ORGANIZATION
takes pride in presenting
A Paul Czinner-l. R. Maxwell
Production,
filmed in London
in Eastman color
featuring "GISELLE"
in two acts
starring
'GALINA LILANOVA
Exactly as presented
before Her Majesty
Queen Elizabeth I I
at the Royal Opera House,
Covent Garden

TugE
~)oaI?
BLLET'

..1

TWICE DAILY
TODAY
and
THURSDAY

Shows at
2 and 8 P.M.
Adults $1.50
DIAL NO 8-6416 Children 50c

Daily-Robert Kanner
THEY'RE ALMOST GONE-The speech department has almost
sold its season tickets for the current fall playbill. Richard Lutz,
who has sold 400 tickets and Enid Weisband demonstrate their
selling technique on the corner of North University and State
Streets.

The speech department has al-
most completely sold out the $3
and $4.50 season tickets for its fall
playbill, according to Thomas
Skinner-of the speech department.
At the present time there are
under 20 lower priced season
tickets left. These are scattered
among about 25 student salesmen
and will be sold until the end of
the week.
The department expects most of
the remaining season tickets to
be purchased by University alumni
and Ann Arbor residents who were
contacted by 5,000 special mail
order forms sent out yesterday.
. Sales Increase
The increase from the 400 sea-
son ulaybill tickets sold by the
speech, department last year to
the record 800 tickets sold in 17
days this year is due to students
selling tickets on a commission
basis, according to Skinner.
"This year we have sold tickets
to people vho usually do 't think
of going to. the theatre," he said.
"We have tried to make theatre
going a habit by contact students
and Ann Arbor residents person-
ally.-
Provides Training
As a student theatre playbill,
the productions provide a training
ground fors~tudents. The .plays are
a combination of student and pro-
fessional talent, Skinner said.
"There are only two kinds of
theatre-good and bad," Skinner
commented. "We ;feel that if -edu-
cational theatre is worth doing, it
is worth seeing, so we decided to
try our new plan for season tick-
ets."$
Ali those who have purchased
season ticketcoupons.can mail
them to the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre on November 3 to receive
their season: tickets.'
In addition to the regular play-
bill of five productions, those hold-
ing season tickets will see a special.
Hopwood play Nov. 20, 21 and 22
and Mozart's opera,"Cosi Fan
Tute" Dec. 15, 16 and 17.
list Production
The playbill will include Eugene
O'Neill's "Ah Wilderness," "The-
Matchmaker" by Thornton Wilder,
Rossini's "The Barber of Seville,"
in conjunction with the, music
school, "Volpone" by Ben Jonson
and Sophocles' "Electra.".
"The department eliminated
special student tickets this year
for the playbill because. they were'
not a good idea," Skinner sadd.;
When students bought the tick-
ets for $3.50, all the good seats'
in the front row, were usually
taken, =leaving'only the poorer ones
for non-students. There actually
are no "bad" seats this year be-
cause the $3 seats include 2 rows in
the back of the first floor and 5
rows in the balcony.

Department
A nnounces
New Plans
Prof. Walter L. Chambers, new-
ly appointed chairman of the Uni-
versitys landscape architecture
department said recently he hoped
to increase the enrollment in the
department by making the unit
morenattractive to prospective
students.
He cited the need for landscape
architects both in private consult-
ing offices and in such govern-
mental offices as the National
Parks Service.
This semester there are only 14
students seeking a bachelor of sci-
ence degree in landscape archi-
tecture and one working toward
a master's degree.
Taught at Harvard
Prof. Chambers' appointment
marks the end of 25 years as a
consultant and a teacher of land-
scape architecture at Harvard
University.
Among Prof. Chambers other
objectives will be an effort to edu-
cate citizens on the scope of the
profession and the role it plays
in their daily lives.
Prof. Chamberssaid that the
sites, for many new construction
projects are actually selected by
the landscape architect.
To Stimulate Interest
He said he hopes to stimulate1
interest through the creation of
close ties with the botany depart-1
ment. He seeks to increase the use
of Nichols Arboretum, of which
he is director, by setting aside ex-
perimental areas to test various
types of plant life.-
The department of landscapea
architecture is part of the archi-
tecture school. There is emphasis
on the biological sciences and1
each student must include a sum-
mer's work either in the field' or
in a consultant's office.
To Meet CrisisI
-Prof. Chambers believes the1
course is such that the output will-
be able to meet a growing crisis.I
The crisis, he said, is found'in the
cities where residents "now hun-I
ger -.for .beauty -and relief from1
congestion." -
Design is the hnge upon which
all aspects of landscape architec-
ture revolve, Prof. Chambers said.
Just as an architect designs a
building, the landcape architect
designs. the area outside the
building. If more than one build-
ing is involved, the landscape ar-
chitect designs the spaces be-
tween them.
This, he feels, makes a team
out of the landscape architectt
and the project architect. r
DIALN16

A scientist and a Swami will
combine efforts at the Univer-
sity's Medical Center tomorrow to
explore some of the mysteries of
the human body.
A prominent yogi from India,
Swami Shantananda, will under-
go extensive tests ..to help re-
searchers study the degree of con-.
trol an individual can exercise
over his body.
The Swami, founder of the
Shanti - Anand - Yoga - Mandir
Yogic University .of Delhi, India,
will be examined by University
scientist Dr. Basu K. Bagchi as
part of the latter's research proj-
it C
y iTo Confer l
The Ann Arbor City Council%
Monday night authorized a meet-
ing between city administrative
officials and representatives of
interested residents on the clues-,
tion of extending service from the
Pittsfield Village water supply
into an adjacent portion of the
former city of East Ann ;Arbor*
area.
City Administrator Guy C. Lar-
com, Jr. told the council that it
would probably take only three
to four months longer to get
water into the former city sec-
tion as a result of an expansion
of city water transmission facili-
ties.
Previously, it was brought in
from the separate Pittsfield Vil-
lage supply. The Village, a rental
apartment area, was recently an-
nexed.
The conferences with represen-;
tatives of property owners who
petitioned for extension of servr
ice from the Village supply are to
include the purpose of gaining
views with respect to the two-to-
three month difference.
Larcom said water should be
available in the former East Ann
Arbor area and other areas in the
southeast city vicinity by the "be-
ginning of next summer" as a re-
sult of expanded water transmis-
sion facilities in that area,
Organization
[ Notices J

REFERENCE

'U' Scientists To Study
Control Exercised by Yogi

T All. Subjects
Thousands at 19c and up
ULRICH'S BOOKSTORE
Opposite Engineering Arch

Great Britain's Outstanding
Musical Organization
TED HEATH
andhis
mUSIC
3udeu Rerds
Featuring
Bobby Britton
Duncan Campbell
Ronnie,Verrell
Johnny Hawksworth
Don Lusher
Fr d Price
Friday, October 10
8:30 P.M.,
FORD AUDITORIUM
$4.75 - $3.75 $2.75

ect on the physical aspects' of
yoga.
Plan New Tests
Dr. Bagchi,. during a visit to
India in 1957, tested Swami Shan-
tananda with medical field equip-
ment. The researcher now plans a
more extensive series of tests un-
der laboratory conditions.
As the Swami goes into liis
"'posture of deep yogic medita-
tion," Dr. Bagchi will measure
changes in chest and abdominal,
breathing, brain waves, heart rate
and galvanic response. If possible,
he will also measure the oxygen
and carbon dioxide content of the
Swami's breath.
Dr. Bagchi will require more
than an hour to hook the Swami
up to the various pieces of sensi-
tive measuring apparatus that
will be used in the test. The tests
themselves are expected to take
two to three hours.
The Swami - the title means
"master of his own self" -- is
touring the 'United States to pro-
mote "understanding and progress
through reason and culture of the
self." Indian students at the Uni-
versity have acclaimed him as " a
standard bearerof the higher and
basic 'values of, life for the regen-
efationi of man.
.anRespiration Drops
During th 1957 tests, Dr. Bag-
chi found that Swami Shantan-
anda could Iower ,his rate of
breathing to 4 to .7 per minute
while in "deep ineditation." The
normal adult breathing rate
ranges from 15 to 23 breaths per
minute..'
The University's India Students
Association repdrts the Swami Is
a forner mining engineer who
"renounced the world in quest of
spiritual knowledge.
Ctlr Speaks
On Den ocrats
Future in U.S
Prof. Richard Cutler of the psy-
chology department will speak to
the Young Democrats on the"
"Democratic Future of America"
at 7:30 p.m. tonight in room 3-G
of the Michigan Union, according
to Torre Bissell, '60, chairman of
the Young Democrats.
After thp speech, reprts will be
given on the various Young Dem-
ocratic activities in the State elec-
tion campaign. Elections will also
be held for the offices of vie-
chairman, recording - secretay
and delegate to the YD State Cen-
tral Committee. After' the meet-
ing refreshments will be served.
Other programs that -are
planned for the Month 'of October
are a reception for Governor Wil-
liams at the Ann Arbor High
School on Oct. 18,and speeches by
Michigan Secretary, of ' State
James Hare and Congressional
candidate Robert Hallon Oct. 22
in room 3-G of the Unin on state
and national issues.
Bissell said that Young Demo-
crats will again participate in the
"room assignment policy" fight
which was started last year.
He also said that Young Demo-
crats are involved in the election
campaign to see that a Democrat-
ic legislature is elected "to end
the devastating effects of Repub-,
lican budget cutting and its de-
bilitation effects on the Univer-
sity are removed."
Bissell emphasized internation-
al students are always welcome to
sit, in on and be a part of Young
Democratic' prograrms. '

1. . r

1

V If 41 '

.

'rII

DIAL NO 2-2513

S

ORS

"Wonderfully
Funny!"
-N.Y. Mirror

(Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations
only. Qrganizations planning to be ac-
tive for the current semester should
register not later.-than Oct. 10. Forms
available, 2011 Student Activities Bldg.)
Grad. Council, Graduate Student
Coffee hour, every Wed., 4:00-5:30 p.m.,
2nd floor, West Lounge, Rackham Bldg.
* * s
Hawaii Club, meeting, Oct. 10, 1:30
p.m. TV Rm. -Lane Hall.
,* 4
La Sociedad Hispanica, first meeting,
Latin-Am, entertainment, slides and
refreshments, all welcome, Oct. 8, 8:qo
p.m., Mich. Rm., League.
Le Cercle Francais, meeting, Oct. 8,
8:00 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
National and International - SGC,
meeting for week, Oct.. 9, 4:00 p.m.,
SAB.
Newman Club, talk, Oct. 9, 8:00 p.m.,
Father Richard Center, Speaker: Fath-
er Vincent Horkin, Superintendent of
Parochial Schools for Archdiocese of
Detroit, "Parochial School ,Education."
Stamm Foundation of Evangelical
United Brethren Church, Bowling Par-
ty, Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m., Lane Hall.
4i a *
Student Chapter Am. Soc. of Civil
Engineers, monthly meeting, Oct. '8,
7:30 p.m., 3rd floor - Rms. KLMN,
,Union. Movie: :Construction of Lake
Pont Chartrain Bridge."
S* e
'Student National Educ. Assoc., or-
ganizational meeting, Oct. 8, 7:30 p.m.,
Coffee Lounge, Ed. School.
Young Democrats, meeting, Oct. 8,
7:30 p.m., 3-G, Union. Speaker: Prof.
Richard Cutler, "The Democratic Fu-
ture of America.",
19W0 J-Rop, petitioning, for' commit-
tee chairmanships - any interested
Junior or, sophomore. Take petitions
Oct. 7-9, 2-5:00 p.m. Return and, sign
up. for interview before' OcJ tIt,-5g:0
p.m., interviewing Oct. 14 and 15,-,2534
SAB.
Chess Club, regular weekly5 meeting,
Oct. 9,.17:30 P.M., 3D, Union.

NOW is positively your LAST
CHANCE to sign up for your
graduation pictures. These pic-
tures are taken ONLY ONCE
each year so make your ap-
pointments immediately I

Rex Kay
HARRISONKEN
(STAR OF 'MY FAIR LADY) (STAR OF 'LES GIRLS')
The Reluctant,
Debutante'
" Coming Friday *
BRIGITT BARDOT
in
"LaParisienne"

Tphis is
YOUR (FIANCE
to
Pranice
Playboysv' Prance
Oct.11l 9:30-1213.0

COLOR by 05 uXL INEVAsCOpp

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL IS NOW' OFFERING

HE

LTH

I

SUR

CE

WED., OCT. 8
Bus. Ad. Bldg.

THURS., OCT. 9
On the Diag

$

00

r 1 - I

In

->,

a

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan