100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1958 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y-TWO DENOMINATIONS TODAY:
Dligious Groups Celebrate Century of Activity

Quartet Presents Chamber Music

EN 'MOORE
ks the end of a
)us organizations

ent religious activity has
from one small group or-
3 in 1858 to participation in
tominational groups func-
on campus today.
groups present co-operative,
ipus events under the direc-
the Office of Religious Af-
ut their main concern is to
he students of their faith.
lenomination provides its
s with a well-rounded pro-
f worship, discussion, coun-
and social activity.

Much of the student religious
interest at the University centers
on the intellectual aspects of reli-
gion. Nearly all of the student
groups are concerned with the eli
gious implications of world and
local events.
For example, many of the groups
discussed last fall's events art Little
Rock in the light of their religious
beliefs and came to a better under-
standing of the questions raised by
the whole issue of segregation ver-
sus integration.
As a result of these discussions,
a petition to the University pro-
testing segregation in the dormi-
tories was written by members of

the Congregational and Disciples
Guild and supported by members
of the other religious groups. This
led to the organization of a stu-
dent committee which engaged in
the study of discriminatory prac-
tices at the University and brought
the integration issue to the atten-
tion of the whole campus.
Understanding Broadened
This is only one example of the
activities and discussions with
which members of student reli-
gious organizations are concerned.
Each group tries to broaden its
student's understanding of his
faith, how his beliefs apply to his

daily living and provides him with
the opportunity to discuss and
thus clarify his views on political,
social, economic and religious is-
sues.}
The majority of student reli-
gious groups work closely with the
local adult religious community.
Such groups include the Roger
Williams Guild connected with the
First Baptist Church of Ann Ar-
bor; the Congregational and Dis-
ciples Guild sponsored jointly by
the First Congregational Church

and the Memorial
Church; The Eastern

Christian
Orthodox

NT GOVERNMENT RUN:
dents Sell Used Books at SBX

4

By JUDY DONER
tudent Book Exchange is a co-
rative service operated by Stu-
t Government Council.
b provides University students
lace to sell their used text books
Sbuy others cheaply.
when booksare sold, 1 per cent
leducted from 'the proceeds to
er advertising, wages and sup-
s of the exchange. Money from
s and any unsold book~s must.
called for between the days
ed on the book card receipt
en to every prospective seller.
rnsod books which are not'
ed for at this time become the
perty of the Exchange..
xchange administrators recom-
id that students price books in
d condition at 60 per cent to
per cent of their original cost
the owner.
he Student Book Exchange was
inally operated under the aus-
s of the Michigan Union. Re-
led as a "white elephant" by
apus organizations in general
the Union in particular, at-
Ipts were made to have it
pted by the Students Legisla-
e, which prqceeded SGC as the
dent representative body.
'he Legislature, however,'main-
ied a "hands off" policy toward
book exchange.
SGC Takes Control
Vith the dissolving of the Stu-
t Legislature, and the advent
SGC, the time seemed ripe for
book exchange to change

Student Soviety whose host parish
is St. Nicholas Church.
Groups Listed
Other organizations under local
church sponsorship are the Episco-
pal Student Foundation of St.
Andrew's Church; the Evangelical
and Reformed Student Fellowship
meeting at Bethlehem Church; the
Grace Bible Church Student Guild
at Grace Bible Church; the stu-
dent group connected with the1
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
Day Saints; the Nauvoo League of
the Latter-Day Saints Reorganiz-
ed; the Wesleyan Guild of the
First Methodist Chuirch; the
Westminister Student' Fellowship
of the First Presbyterian Church;

the Unitarian Student Group of
the First Unitarian Church; the
Baha'i Student Group which meets
with the local adult group; ,,and
the Young Friends Fellowship
which is a part of the Ann Arbor
Friends meeting.
Some of the religious organiza-
tions maintain independent, stu-
dent-supported places of worship.
The Campus Chapel, religious cen-
ter for students belonging to, the
Christian Reformed Churches; the
B'nai.B'rith Hillel Foundation for
Jewish students; the University
Lutheran Chapel for members of
the Lutheran Church - Missouri
Synod;,the Lutheran Student
Chapel for members. of the Na-
tional Lutheran Council; and the
Catholic Students' St. Mary's Stu-
dent Chapel each have individual
student worship, study and social
programs located in their own
self-supporting centers.
Among the groups who use the
facilities available to them at Lane
Hall for their meetings are the
Christian Science Organization;
the Ann Arbor Mennonite Fellow-
ship; the Moslem Religious Asso-
ciation and the inter-denomina-
tion Michigan Christian ,Fellow-
ship.

The Stanley Quartet has given
more thah a dozen world premiers
in Ann Arbor.
These four members of the Uni-
versity faculty present public con-
certs locally and in other Michi-
gan communities annually.
Established as the outgrowth
of a plan submitted to the Uni-
versity in 1944 by the Quartet's
first violinist, Gilbert. Ross, the
group was granted official recog-
nition by the Board of Regents
when the personnel of the Quartet
was completed in 1949.

Named for 'U' Professor
The Quartet was named to
honor the late Albert A. Stanley,
professor of music at the Univer-
sity from 1889 tor1922. One of its
purposes has been to encourage
understanding and appreciation

_'-.r V- - -

1600

WH RY

1600,

of chamber and classical music.
Ross, first violinist, made debuts
in Berlin, New Yorkand London
and has had extensive concert ex-
perience in Europe and America
as soloist and quartet player. He
has performed many contempor-
ary works for the first time.
Second violinist is Gustave Ros-
seels, graduate and former mem-
ber of -the faculty of the Royal
Conservatory of Brussels.
He was with the Pro Nova:
Quartet in Europe and in 1946
joined the Paganini Quartet in'
the United States. He has record-
ed for many record companies.
Violist-Robert Courte
Violist for the group is Robert
Courte, who also studied at Brus-
sels and was a member of its fac-
ulty. He has toured Europe, the

United States and Canada
the Paganini Quartet.
Oliver Edel, who has th
Europe and America with
Manhattan and Roth Quarte
cellist. He studied at Fontainb
and Paris, France and made
debut in New York City. Edel
taught at various schools and
versities and has done coa
work..
The Library of Congress
Washington, Cleveland, Cha
ton, and many eastern andx
western colleges and univers
are places at which the Sta
Quartet has played. They
presented all of ,the string q
tets by Beethoven and r
works by Haydn and Mozai
third of the music they pla
contemporary.

Within a 60-day period from the
beginning of the semester, the ac-
tivities of the {Student Book Ex-
change must be terminated.
This means that no more books
may be sold, no more money may
be relegated to student owners of
sold books and no. more books may
be brought in for selling purposes
until the Exchange opens. at the
semester's end.
Pick-Up Locations
Students can present their used
books for sale in various ways.
During the winter semester, a
collection table is provided ins the
lobby of Mason Hall. In the spring

semester, a collection booth is lo-

cated on the Diagonal.
Used book pick-ups are

made

through the housing units. Hous-
ing groups on campus are respon-
sible for collecting books from
residents of their house and ar-
ranging for SBX pick-up.
The Book Exchange is headed by
the Exchange manager, who is a
paid student worker. In addition,
an assistant manager, a cashier
and three assistant cashiers are
employed by the Exchange.
The Exchange depends on Stu-
dent volunteer help in addition
to these officials.
- -dll

FROSH MEN

Are you looking for that
Extra-Curricular Activity ?

L O
The
v' AGENCY
o Office and Showroom
1103 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE
ORCHESTRAS
PARTY FAVORS
PHOTOGRAPHY
FLOWERS
' Outdoor Dance Floor Rental
O /DON'T DELAY Q
Plan your parties Now ... NO2-6362
e moe.. ttom o o=ooc> "ot>© 1

ANN ARBOR'S DYNAMIC VOICk
F-
Joe Gentile 'and DON HERMAN
Ralph Binge for News Editor
7:05-9 A.M.
N The "HEADLESS
"OL LIES Beautiful Carl & Sharp Frank
(Marriage is a Living.Death)
RA(Aswinging Cat)
AWEATHER 6:45 P.M
9 .M1 A.M. Monday thru Friday
STEVEMVAN PATRICK
FILIPIAK SPORTS SPORTS
3 P.M.-6:30 P.M. 6:30 P.M.
Top of Your Radio Dial

'*

JOIN THE UNION
STAFF
Come to the Mass Meeting
First Thursday of classes
LOOK FOR THE POSTERS!

I

St first, would have no
the' Exchange but later,
sponsibility, for it.
ting at the beginning and
each sem~ester, SBX of-
dents a limited amount, of
which to take advantage

1600

WHRV

1600

i

S.

UDENr'

GOVERNMENT

COUNCIL

7

-S

IL

r

V

lk

L/

~I.

S GC
* Provides Student
Health Insurance
* Handles Calendaring
of University Events
* Sponsors the Cinema Guild

S.G.C.
* Conducts Human

Relations Board

* Controls Student Book

Exchange

* Improves Student-Faculty
Relations

i

"II

I

./'.

1S

LI
h.-

C,

Sl

lb

Vi

Lb

yt

V/

Take advantage of the many opportunities it offers vou.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan