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October 04, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-04

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TV Program Provides Colle
ammmmemesoseagnge Fgm

GRAPHIC 'FINISH-Prof. Gordon Farrell of the University of .
Detroit Spanish department assumes the role of flower salesman
to illustrate a Spanish vocabulary drill for his television audience
of students. Students who enroll receive full college credit for their
work.

Cohen Names Forces
Opposing Slum Growth

make better adjustment, to the.
continuing social change.
Emerging social problems have
been sensed by the settlements,"
he said, and the "rapidity of pres-
ent and impending social changes{
requires increased emphasis on
research. into human needs and;
ways of meeting them.
Services Offered
"Information in this area con-
cerns both the services offered by
neighborhood centers and the ori-
gins of the need for these serv-
ices."
Praising the settlements and,
neighborhood centers as "general
practitioners among specialists in
social work," Cohen said, "These
are some of the few agencies'
whose concern is a face-to-face
relationship with the whole hu-
man being.
"Their distinction lies in their
concern with the whole commu-
nity, the partnership of people
and agencies."
Objectivep Incorporated
Public services or specialized
activity organizations have incor-
porated, into them many objec-
tives of the settlement program,
Cohen cited. With the rising
standards of health, income and
education plus state and national
legislation helping the least secure
groups - old people, children, the
handicapped and the unemployed
-have at least alleviated abject
poverty.
"Slum clearance" has been
graduated into a more compre-
hrnsive .community-wide move-
ment for city planning and urban
redevelopment, Cohen said. Chief-
ly poverty is a serious problem
when earnings have been inter-
rupted by sickness, unemployment
or shortened working time.
Two main problems are faced
by the settlements in the future,
Cohen contended, these being: 1)
many neighborhood leaders have
moved from the central city to
the suburbs and 2) normal flow
of new immigrants outside the
core cities of major metropolitan
areas have been prevented by col-
or barriers.

ge Credits
For the second consecutive year,
the University of Detroit is offer-
ing college credits via television
courses.
The program, financed by a Ford
Foundation grant and called "TV
College," is including qualified
Detroit high school seniors for the
first time.
"TV College" presents regularly
scheduled lectures by members of
the University of Detroit faculty
on the UHF television station,
WTVS. Students enrolled in
courses must supplement the half-
hour lectures with on-campus dis-
cussions and quizzes once a week.
The experiment in education be-
gan last September and proved to
be "very successful" with chiefly
adult participants, according to
the project's director, Prof. Francis
Arlinghaus.
College Courses Included
He said the program for "su-
perior" high school students in-
cludes two freshman college
courses, English I1 (rhetoric 'and
composition) and Mathematics 25
(analytic geometry and calculus).
The high school students partici-
pating in the "TV College" were
chosen through placement tests
and approvals from their high
school principals. The students
also must have a television set
which receives the broadcasts from
WTVS and be enrolled in special
advanced high school subjects.
Other subjects' offered adults
eligible to take college freshman
courses include elementary Span-
ish, an economics survey and
American history before 1865. An
advanced survey of English litera-
ture is offered to students with
the proper prerequisites.
Those taking courses for credit
enroll with the University of De-
troit and pay regular tuition fees.
Any credit earned in courses is
"normally transferrable" to other
schools, Prof. Arlinghaus said.
Evidence Supports Theory
Evidence supports the theory
that television classes 'are much
larger than the actual number of
enrolled students indicates. There
is no way to count the number, of
casual viewers who tune into the
lectures, but Prof. Arlinghaus
noted that the sale of textbooks
far exceeds the enrollment totals
for the classes.
University of Detroit adminis-
trators regard the "TV College"
educational experiment as a pos-
sible aid in. providing educations
for the great many students who
are expected to enroll in colleges
in the next few years.
Television courses, supplemented
by periodic visits to the campus for
tests and discussions, could pro-
vide all freshman and sophomore
credits, the administrators agree.
STATE
.3REGORY -
PECK )
' JEAN
SIMMONS
CARROLL
' BAKER
CHARLTON
- BURL
IVES WILIAM
WYLER S
PRODUCTION
I0"""

Legislature
Dscussion
Setgo rfT
An overall look aj how Michi-
gan law functions and' how it af-
fects citizens in the state will le
reviewed by Lieutenant Governor
Philip M. Hart and Speaker of
the House George Van Peursem.
They will appear on television
to discuss the function of the
state legislature with Prof. Daiel
McHargue of the political science
department.
Entitled "The Legislature," the
program is a part of the Govern-
ment of Michigan series which
appears on Saturdays at 8:30 a.m.
over WXYZ-TV Detroit.
With the aid of graphic ma-
terial, the three will describe how
a bill becomes a law, hoW' the
committee system functions and
will also make an evaluation of
the efficiency of the law-making
process of the-State of Miehigan
. As the presiding officer of their
respective houses, Hart and Van
Peursem will describe the house
opening day procedres and' their
part in the functions of the day.
.DIAL tN0'8-6416
Playing through Monday
"A French Classic
becomes a Great Movie!"
-Jesse Zunser, Cue
.u
-Dorothy Kigo e'
DANIELLE *.GERARD
DARRIEUX P ILIPE
STENS'iqlS'
OheBLACK"
(ROUGE ET NOIR)
Prt i IECHNICLR
"A fascinating job-this is p high-
powered screen translation of
Stendhals searching rovel!"
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
I-

I

: is-:.

COMING.TUESDAY
BOLSHO
-BALLET
Twice daily at T and 8 P.M.

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