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September 30, 1958 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-30

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TAlE MICHIGAN DAILY

I j FA7XL L I.1LI1 iu

I

INSIDE CHATTER

ON THE I-M SCENE:
Rumsey Beats Gomberg

I

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

..,by SI COLEMAN

Tough Opener
SMICHIGAN WAS EXPECTED to have a tough opening game. As
things turned out, it almost bit off more than it could chew. A
fighting but undermanned ball club from Southern California threw
quite a scare into the Wolverines last Saturday. But fumbles, inter-
cepted passes, penalties and a guy named John Herrnstein were too
much for the Trojans to overcome.
One fact was clear, however. The squad from the West coast had
nothing torbe ashamed of when the final whistle blew, ending Michi-
gan's home debut of 1958. The Trojans put up a whale of a battle.
Th~eir team is filled primarily with' sophomores, and the future for
Don Clark's squd is bright. It couldn't happen to a nicer guy. A brief
locker room meeting with the Trojan coach after Saturday's game
game proved what a real pro Clark is. He could have been bitter about
the loss. After all, to him every bad break in the game probably
seemed to hit his team. He was disappointed, of course, but he took
nothing away from the spirited play of the Wolverines. Hecalled
Michigan a real big and strong team and predicted a good season
for the Ann Arborites.
One of the outstanding players for Southern Cal was Hillard
Hill, a 6-1, 175-lb. senior. Hill sat out last season with a kidney ail-
nment, but the year's layoff seemed to have no effect on him. The
burly end was constantly ,in Michigan's backfield Saturday, putting
the pressure on the passers. And his pass-catching ability was more
than adequa.te.
Speaking of players who were handicapped in their junior year
by injuries, Michigan has one also. Tabbed as a.}great fullback from
the minute he arrived on campus, John Herrnstein has had to overcome
injury after injury. This season he looks like he is finally ready, and
barring further' misfortune, Herrny should have a great year., For
Michigan's sake, let's hope so. There is no doubt about it. Saturday
he was great. He gained 144 yards in 26 tries, an average of 5.5 yards
per try. And his defensive play was stirring. The entire Michigan
team only gained 191 yards by rushing,
Spartans Ahead
T HE MOST LOGICAL explanation, or realization if you prefer, for
,Michigan's narrow margin of victory is not a new reason. It's
been heard many times before; immediately 'after the opening game.
The explanation is: Michigan plays Michigan State in the second
Igame of the season and everyone has his mind on that game. Im-
mediately after the Southern Cal game, I, drove my way through the
crowd and eventually arrived in the Michigan locker room. I spoke to
five players, commenting to all of them how rough the play had been.
And do you know something, every single one of those men made the
same reply. "Yes, it was pretty tough, but next weeks it's going to be
a heck of a, lot tougher." That could be the understatement of the year.
While Michigan was struggling to defeat Southern Cal last Satur-
day, Michigan State had a relatively] easy time rolling over the
California Golden Bears. The Spartans played very conservative
football, and showed little of the gridiron trickery which they will
surely use against the Wolverines. Of course, Michigan didn't exactly
reveal very much either for the Spartan scouts. When I asked
Oosterbaan after the game about the extra point play, and whether
Michigan would ever try for ,two points, something it didn't attempt
Saturday, he replied, "Well, if I told you, that would be like telling
the other coach." And I'm sure Duffy Daugherty would like to know
what Michigan will do on the extra point play because it is just possible
that a single point, or two will decide this week's game between the
state rivals.

TOUCHDOWN BOUND - John Herrnstein, Michigan fullback,
plunges through the USC line to score his second touchdown in
Saturday's opener. Practice this week will accent the Wolverine's
defensive play.
nsung' obs mShines,
On Wolverine Defense

Scott Cleveland's all around play
led Allen-Rumsey to an upset 16-6
victory over Gomberg in the top
game on the opening day of play,
i' I-M residence hall 'A' football.
Cleveland passed for both Rum-
sey scores as well as being the
game's outstanding runner and
defensive back. A
Gomberg, a traditional power,
scored first, but Allen - Rumsey
scored at the qnd of the first half
on a pass from Cleveland to Bob
Litten to tie the score
I-* games will feature the point
extra point, although there is no
way in which a team can go for
one as there is no place kicking.
.,In other 'A' action at Ferry
Field Bob Brewbaker passed Lloyd
to a decsive 14-2 victory over Scott.
Taylor, last year's runner up to
Reeves, toppedi Anderson 14-8. Kel-
sey defeated Adams 14-8. Strauss
shut out Wenly 14.-0 and Hinsdale
beat Greene 8-6.
In 'B' games yesterday afternoon
Allen-Runsey, routed Huber 34-6,
Strauss edged Chicago 8-6, Lloyd
beat Williams 8-0 and Adams de-
feated Taylor '6-0 on Steve File's
touchdown pass to John Shreves.
In night action at Wines Field
defending 'A' champion,,, Reeves,
defeated Michigan 7-6. Scoring the
one point in overtime by moving
the ball farther than Michigan.
Other 'A' games saw Williams edge
Hinsdale 2-0, Winchell 14-Huber
0.

'B' games played last night were
won by Wenly 8-6 over Cooley,
Greene whipping Chicago 12-6 and
Winchell 6-0 over Haydn.
Earl Riskey, head of the I-M
department, stated yesterday that
there is a shortage of officials.
He asks all those interested in of-
ficiating games to contact the
I-M building at NO 3-4181.

New 'York
Chicago
Boston
Cleveland
Detroit
Baltimore
Kansas City
Washington

W L Pct.+
92 62 .597
82 72 .532
79 75 .513
77 76 .503
77 77 .500
74 79 .484
73 81 .474
61 93 '.396

GB
10
13
14%
15
17Z
19
31
4-3

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
Milwaukee 92 92, .597
Pittsburgh 84 70 .454
San Francisco 80 74 .519
Cincinnati 76 78 .494
St. Louis 72 82 .468
Chicago 72 82 .468
Los Angeles X71 83 .461
Philadelphia 69 85 .448

SUNDAY'S RESULTS
New York 7-6, Baltimore
Cleveland 6, Detroit 2
Boston 6, Washington 4
Chicago 11, Kansas City 4

9

SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 4, Milwaukee 0
Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 4
(10 innings)
San Francisco 7, St. Louis 2
Only games scheduled

m

MMMU

GB
8
12
16
20
20
21
23

Husky Tom Jobson's football
debut Saturday added another
chapter to the "all state bunk"
that coaches and keen-eyed re-
cruiters have learned to scorn.
The stubby, blond Michigan
sophomore brought only his rugged
205 pounds and streak of mean-
ness with him when he stepped
into the game against Southern
California; there was no scrapbook
of clippings.
But his fine performance against
the Trojans established him as one
of the top yearlings to watch in
the Wolverine lineup.
Jobson played about 25 minutes
as one of only 23 Michigan players
to get into the game. He and senior
starter Jerry Marciniak mnonop-
olized all of the right guard play-
ing time.
"Tom wasn't an all-stater in
prep school," Wally Weber, his
freshman coach, noted the day:
before the opener, "but we heard
of him and got a look at him.
"We've peen satisfied ever since."
Despite his lack of "ail" publicity
at small ;Flinit "Manderville High,
Jobson came to Michigan on schol-
arship and developed, fast after
being moved from tackle to ;guard.
In fall drills he worked his "way
up to second string, mainly because
of his superb blocking.
His finest moments in the
Southern Cal tilt, however, were
on defense when he twice threw
Trojan backs for losses in the im-
portant ,third quarter.
Actually, it wasn't known until
late last week whether he could
play in the opener due to a recent
leg injury.

Jobson and his teammates ,spent
yesterday jogging through a few
plays and looseningzup on pass de-
fense in the lightest scrimmage
of the: year.
The Wolverines' one-two quar-
terback punch, Bob Ptacek and
Stan Noskin ;watched the proceed-
ings from the side lines. Ptacek
had, hid hand bandaged after suf-
fering lacerations ,Saturday from
a Southern Cal cleat.
Noskin was withheld from drills,
due to a cold.

tkz
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Don't Forge

GRID SELECTIONS
The winner of the first grid picks contest is still somewhat of a
mystery to us.
The victor failed to include his, her or its first name on their entry
and therefore we are appealing to Soaby, 528 Walnut, to come to The
Daily and collect his prize.
Soaby picked 18 out of twenty games right and tied with Dennis
Loeffler, 6316 Scott House, South Quad, but Soaby picked Michigan
to win 24-20 and thereby edged out Loeffler, who had the Wolverines
winning 22-15, to win the movie tickets.
All the losers get another chance this week. Send or bring all
entries to: Grid Picks, Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

I

MASS MEETING
TON IGHT at 7:30

ults Top Lions in NFL Opener 28-15;
rowns, Bears, Forty Niners, Giants Win

1; MICHIGAN AT Mich. St.
(score)
2. West Virginia at Indiana
3. Washington at Ohio State
4. Stanford at Northwestern
5. Illinois at Duke
6. Yale at Brown
7. Wash. St. at California
8. Virginia at N.C. St.
9. UCLA at Oregon St.
10. Tulane at Ga. Tech.
Top Ten
Oklahoma, on the strength
of its 47-14 victory over West
Virginia, was No. one again in
the Associated Press football
poll-
Defending champion Auburn
plays the bridesmaid role with
Ohio State, displaced from the
top spot, , in third place. Be-
hind the Buckeyes in the top
10, in order are Michigan
State, Army, Mississippi, Notre
Dame, Iowa, Wisconsin and
Clemson.
Michigan rated 16th spot in
the poll
9d

11. Notre Dame at SMU
12. Pittsburgh at Minnesota
13. Penn at Dartmouth
14. Penn St. at Army
15. Oregon at Oklahoma
16. Miss. St. at Tennessee
17. Clemson at Maryland
18. Colorado at Kansas
19. Harvard at Cornell
20. Rutgers at Colgate

I

at the Student Activities Building

-

.: j

vo- AV avxT A T

By AL SINAI
The dramatic Detroit Lions, de-
fending champions of the Nation-
al Football League, failed to pull
their usual theatrics Sunday, as
they lost the opener of the seasoi
to the Baltimore Colts, 28-15.
The Lions, known for the1r
"m i r a c I e" finishes last year,
seemed to lose their golden touch
as they blew four beautiful scor-
ing chances.
Among them was a 15-yard
field goal attempt and two tries
for extra points.
The Colts' defensive line, led by
Gene (Big Daddy) Lipscomb held
Snuth Named
To Pilot Reds
Mayo Smith, former manager
of the Philadelphia Phils, was
signed last night to. a one-year
contract to manage the Cincin-
nati Redlegs.
Earlier yesterday Solly Hemus
was named player-manager of
the St. Louis Cardinals.

and then Jim Martin, who had l
continuously booted the ball out
of the end zone on kickoffs,
missed a 15-yard field goal.
Browns Victorious
Lou Groza's kicking and Jimmy
Brown's running led last year's
Eastern Division c h a m p i o n s,,
Cleveland, to , 30-27 victory over
the Los Angeles Rams. Brown
gained 171 .Yards in 24 attempts
and scored twice, while Groza
booted a four-yard field goal with
23 seconds to go for the winning
margin.
* * *
Bears Roll
The powerful Chicago Bears
rolled to a 34-20 win over the
Green Bay Packers. Rookie 'Willie
Gallimore scored three touch-
downs for the Bears.
* * * '
Kicking remains a big part of
the pro game as was shown by
Gordie Soltau of the San Fran-
cisco 49ers. He booted a 22-yard
field goal with less than three
minutes to go to beat the Pitts-
burgh Steelers, 23-20.

Redskins Win.
The Philadelphia Eagles were
defeated by a fourth quarter rally'
of the Washington Redskins,
24-14, while the New York Giants
Notice
Cliff Keen, Michigan wrest-
ling coach, has announced a
meeting to be held today at 4
P.m; in the wrestling room of
the sports building for all var-
sity and freshman mat candi-
dates.
smothered the Chicago Cardinals,
37-7. Frank Gifford scored three
times and Alex Webster twice for
the Giants.

I

3
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; ;}°:s

CARLOS MONTOYA
IN PERSON
at the DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
Thursday, Oct. 2, 4-5 P.M.

Collegiate
Hairstyling a
Specialty!!
0 12 Barbers
No Waiting
" Air Conditioned
WELCOME
The Daseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

I

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"MOST VIVID PLAY
"SET BROADWAY AB"IZE Of DECADE"
N. Y.Tribmw I. Y. Times
Dkect from a full year on Broadway
DAVID MERRICK sests
KENNETH HA GH
a (Star of London and Broadway Productious)
in
New York Critics Prize Play
LOOK BACK IN ANGER
w JOHN OSBORNE
with
Diana Hyland Jack Llvsey
Eizabeth Hubbard Al Muscari
Murected by TONY RICHARDSON
setting by ALAN TAGG
Stin, t&aZ & Cstiua s Superlse4 k bNOWARD BAY

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4%fty', Profound, Sexy'" =Poierfuland EngrsSing"'
I.Y. News liationwlde Ywidy

Spaldings have distinction
that Can't be copied and is always
recognized. Spalding Saddles show

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