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September 20, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

R LEAGUES:
irates Stay Alive on Friend's Win

UCLA Favored
Over Pittsburgh

:.

[ILADELPHIA (A') - Right-
er Bob Friend became the
n's top winner in the majors
;ht, bagging his 22nd with a
hitter as Pittsburgh's persis-
Pirates defeated Philadelphia
e Pirates, refusing to call it
in the National League pen-
ador League
Standings

nant race, haven't had a 22-game
winner since 1928, when Burleigh
Grimes had a 25-14 record.
Friend now has won six straight
since losing his 13th August 20.
He had . a one-hitter until the
seventh, when the last place Phils
scored both their runs with three
hits.
* s *
DETROIT (A') The Cleveland
Indians got only foursingles off
Detroit right-hander Paul Foy-
tack yesterday, but made them
good for a 2-1 victory as the
Tigers stranded 16 runners. The
defeat ended a six-game Detroit
winning streak.
Cal McLish gave up nine hits

over the first
Jim (Mudcat)
brilliant relief

seven innings but
Grant turned in a
job to secure Mc-

Lish's 16th pitching triumph.
Grant didn't allow a hit, struck
out one batter in the eighth and
retired the side on strikes in the
ninth.
CINCINNATI (W - Jerry
Lynch, hittingest Cincinnati Red-
leg right now, fattened his aver-
age to .313 tonight leading an ex-
plosion of power that sank Mil-
waukee's Braves, 7-1.
It frustrated - temporarily, at
least -- the Braves' aim to clinch
at least a tie for the National
League pennant.

Although the opening of the
Big Ten football season is still
one week away many of the na-
tions top teams will be starting
their seasons tomorrow.
Most of the games scheduled
will be played in the South, South-
west and West. No game of major
importance are slated in the Mid-
west.
Topping the list of intersec-
tional encounters is the game in
which Pittsburgh meets UCLA at
Los Angeles. The Bruins are
favored mainly because six seniors
limited to a half season's eligibility

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pc.tC
Milwaukee 88 60 ,.595
Pittsburgh 83 65 .561
San Francisco 76 71 .5171
Cincinnati 75 74 .503 1
St. Louis 70 77 .476
Los Angeles 68 79 .4631
Chicago 67 80 .456Z
Philadelphia 63 84 .429
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 8, St. Louis
Los Angeles 5, Chicago 1
Cincinnati 7, Milwaukee 1
Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 2
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at St. Louis
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
Los Angeles at Chicago'
Milwaukee at Cincinnati
W LPct.(G
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
New York 89 58 .405
Chicago 78 68 .534 U
Detroit 73 - 72 .543 11
Cleveland 72 73 .497 1
Boston 72 74 .493 1
Kansas City 70 77 .476 1
Baltimore 68 77 .469 20
Washington 61 84 .421 2
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 5," New York 4
Cleveland 2, Detroit r
Boston 2, Washington 0
Kansas City 7, Chicago 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Detroit (2)
New York at Baltimore
Washington at Boston
Chicago at Kansas City

G~B
5
13%4
17h2
1

BOB FRIEND
. . . wins number 22

BROWNS, GIANTS TOP EAST:
Lions, Bears, Colts Battle in NFL Western Division

will play in the first five games
instead of the last five as origi-
nally intended.
The television game of the week
pits Missouri against Vanderbilt.
The game can be seen on station
WWJ-TV, Channel 4, Detroit, at
3:45 p.m. CST. Former Michigan
State assistant Dan Devine will
be making his debut as head coach
at Missouri. Vanderbilt is slightly
favored in this contest. This game
will give televiewers their first
chance to see the new extra point
rule in action.
PCC's Last Year
The Pacific Coast Conference
starts its last season before dis-
banding at the year's end when
Washington State meets Stanford
and Oregon battles Idaho in
league action.
The top southern game features
Kentucky at Georgia Tech. Tech
will be trying to rebound after a
disappointing season last year.'
Other top games on tap are
North Carolina vs. North Carolina
State, Rice vs. LSU, South Caro-
lina vs. Duke, Texas vs. Georgia,
Texas A&M vs. Texas Tech, Penn
State vs. Nebraska, and Kansas:
vs. TCU.

S PORT-WHYS
The Injury, Jinx
THE COLLEGIATE gridiron season has begun. The few contests
played last night, and the many more that will take place this
afternoon mark the opening of another season of battling on the
nation's collegiate football fields. Although Michigan and the other
Big Ten schools don't begin until next Saturday, many of the games
that have already taken place are of interest.
Southern California, Michigan's opponent at Ann Arbor next
Saturday, opened its season with a 22-8 loss to Oregon State, pre-
season pick to represent the lame-duck Pacific Coast Conference in
the Rose Bowl this year.
Meanwhile the Wolverines are having many problems of their
own. They will scrimmage in Michigan Stadium this afternoon. The
session is closed to all spectators except a select group of press men,.
This will probably be the last scrimmage before the opening game,
according to coach Bennie Oosterbaan.
The problems that plague Oosterbaan and his aides are primarily
in the form of injuries. The list of those not expected to take part.
this afternoon includes half of the starting team. Walt Johnson, first-
string end, has a hip injury; Brad Myers, who can start at either
halfback, has a bad knee; Don Deskins, the burly sophomore who
has taken over at right tackle, is suffering from a shoulder injury;
Gary Prahst, the other starting end, still is bothered by the knee in-
jury sustained in the first scrimmage of the season; Captain John
Herrnstein, Wolverine fullback, probably will stay out because of his
broken nose and cheekbone.
Aside from these first-stringers, Alex Callahan has a bad back
and tape allergy, sophomore end John Halstead - who was stand-
ing in for Prahst - has hurt his shoulder, and Tom Jobson has a
bad knee. Although all of these players have been out at practice,
they cannot be counted on for contact work.
Injuries have already removed Jim Byers, who was counted on as
starting center this fall, when he hurt his knee in an early practice
session. Oosterbaan points out that of the three sophomores who have

GB

i%
6
9
27

By CHUCK KOZOLL
If history intends to repeat it-
self in the National Football
League, it will have to do so
against overwhelming odds.
The only sure bet in pre-season
prognostication is that a wild
scramble for top positions will
mark league play. Detroit emerges,
with the slightest edge in the
Western Division with Chicago or
Baltimore in the most convenient
position to dethrone the present
,champions.
Dual quarterbacking chores
handled by Bobby Layne and
Tobin Rote plus strong running
backs like John Henry Johnson,
Gene Gedman and Hopalong Cas-
sidy give the Lions exceptiontal
1ffensive power. Weakest link in

the Motor City crew appears to be
their porous defense which has comprise a deadly running game
allowed 56.2 per cent of enemy with John Unitas able to spark a
passes to be completed. powerful passing game. Speed will
Recent additions to the offensive come this year from rookie Len
line include Alex Karras, All-. Lyles, who can run the 100 yd.
American tackle from Iowa, and dash in :09.5 carrying his 200 lbs.
Wayne Walker who played for Y. A. Tittle returns to govern
Idaho, along with veteran center the San Francisco 49ers with
Charley Ane give the Lions power Michigan's former great Jim Pace
up the middle. touted to start in the backfield
Predicted by many gridiron along with Billy Wilson and Clyde
prophets to bring the champion- Conner. Suspected weakness in the
ship back to Chicagoland is George de of the defensive line may
Halas and Co. of the Bears, whoht the western group.
have already begun to shake up Rely on Wade
the Wrigley Field area. Established Los Angeles, With the famed
performers like end Harlan, Hill, Norm Van Broclin traded off, will
center Larry Strickland and de- be caught short if Bill Wade can-
fensive end Doug Atkins provide not come through. Green Bay is a
needed balance with J. C. Caroline big question mark with "Scooter"
running from halfback along with McLean in his freshman year as
Perry Jeter and Willie Gallimore Packer coach. Strongest area for
give the Bears a potentially power- the Wisconsin group is dual signal
ful scoring threat. callers Bart Starr and Babe Parelli.
Baltimore's third place contin- With Paul Brown operating his
gent could prove to be the group new puppet quarterback, Milt Plum
to upset either Detroit or Chicago. of Penn State, the Browns will try
Alan Ameche and Lenny Moore to make it a continuation of pre-

vious performances. Jim Brown,
who leads the Browns in ground.
gaining will be the Cleveland
group's strongest weapon on the
.turf.
Strong Defense
New York, who played the brides-
maid role in 1957, will rely heavily
on the prize from Vanderbilt, Phil
King to spark its bid to dethrone
the Brown group. Frank Gifford,
halfback, Roosevelt Brown and
Ray Wietcha in the line give the
Giants the needed offensive punch.
Veteran quarterback Eddie Le-
Baron, who ranked second on pass-
ing in the pro circuit last year
gives Washington a sure chance of
reaching near the leaders. Backs
Don Bosseler, Jim Podoley and Ed
Sutton give the Redskins much
power in the backfield.
New Quarterback
When Van Brocklin moved from
Los Angeles to Philadelphia, the
Eagles rating took a big jump.
Under the new tutelage of Buck
Shaw, Walt Kowalczyk, the giant
Michigan State blacksmith, and
Purdue's Mel Dillard will spur on
the Philly group.
Buddy Parker's second year with
the Steelers should patch up the
giant holes -in the offensive line
and hope for the best with the
Chicago Cardinals placing faith in
wet fields and Ollie Matson.

Ii

You have tried the Rest-Now try the Best

looked the best so far - Jobson, Halstead and center Dick Syring -
two are now out with injuries.
What is this "injury jinx" that seems to pry at Michigan every
year? Last season Herrnstein, the big offensive threat besides Jim
Pace, had to spend most of the season sidelined. Pace himself had
to battle injury, and was knocked out after a brilliant start In the
Illinois game.
Although many observers seem to feel that Michigan is hit hard-
er than most other teams, perhaps the crucial thing is that the Wol-
verines don't have the necessary depth to replace losses without
hurting the potential of the team. Of course, few schools do, but
many of those few are on the annual Michigan schedule.
... One Week To Repair
SPEAKING OF that schedule - it is only a week away. Injuries or
not, Oosterbaan will have to field a team in just one week. A
team that is rated lower than any Michigan outfit in many years -
one begins to wonder if the sports forecasters were forecasting in-
juries along with everything else. The Wolverines will certainly live
up- to their low rating if they can only field half of their good players.
On the other hand - if everyone is well, and stays that way
throughout the season -- Michigan could surprise, some' people.

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Students .

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DON CLARK
. .. Trojan coach

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Special to the Daily
NEWPORT, R.I.-Today at noon
the 107th year of the historic
America's Cup Series sailing clas-
sic will begin between %American
and British crews and ships.
The Cup has become one of the
greatest sports trophies of the
world, although it seldom gets top
piblicity by the press. It stands
for far more than simple victory
in the emotions of the sailors of
the world's two top seafaring na-
tions.
It is a battle in which the top
crews from both nations are as-
sembled on the best sloops that
exist.
A crowd of about 8,000 people,

floating on many different specta-
tor ships will attempt to get a
glimpse of the fast ships. Presi-
dent Eisenhower and his wife,
aboard the destroyer Mitcher will
be among the group.
Like World Series
The competition is like the world
series of baseball, as it is a best-
of-seven race. They will race a 24-
mile course, with one race run
each day until one crew has won
four.
The sloop selected by the Ameri-
cans is the Columbia, the choice1
made over three other yachts that
asked consideration. The three
losers have since added all that
they can to the American repre-;
sentative in the way of sail andi

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to the
heart of the campus
ATTEND ONE OF THE
BUSINESS OR EDITORIAL STAFF
MEETINGS:-
Wednesday, September 24. 4:15,7:15
Thursday, September 25 ..4:15

Briggs Cunningham, famed as an
auto - racer and yachtsman
throughout the world, and the
crew reads as a who's-who of the
United States' sailing personnel.
The British boat, the Sceptre,
is a newcomer, and has never been
in a race, while the Columbia has
raced 29 official times. However,
the Bnglish crew doesn't feel that
they are at a disadvantage.
Being an unknown quantity, the
Sceptre has been closely observed
by Americans, but no one can
really say that they are acquainted
with its possibilities.
Actually, it is a battle of ideas
and knowledge on sailing. The
two boats represent a difference of
opinion on the parts of the op-
posing crews. They have different
construction below the water line,
and are using different sail.
Columbia Has Edge
The expert opinion here ranks
them about equal, although the
Columbia is given the edge in
rough water and high wind. This
is perhaps an advantage that will
pay off, since Newport is famed
for stormy weather in late Septem-
ber.
The forecast is fair weather,
but tricky and shifting winds. No
flat promises of any part cular
wind direction could be made to
the yachtsmen, and it may be an
exciting and nerve-racking race
today.
A high front moved in yesterday,
bringing cool temperatures and
northerly and northwesterly winds
ranging from 15 to 20 miles an
hour. If the temperature rises to-
day, a light sea breeze from the
southeast should take over.
In such a light breeze the two
ships would be rated about equal.
Then it will be a test of crews, and
of the differences in shape and
sail. Such a test of the two op-

posing designs has never been
made up to this- time.-as the
Sceptre's is relatively new.
The British have never won the
cup since the American crew of
the America (thus the name Amer-
ica's Cup) won it in 1851. This
year's English crew seems more
confident, with their new sloop,
than in many years.
M'Sail
To Defend
-Title Today
Bruce Goldsmith, a member of
the Michigan sailing club the past
few years, and one of the top,
skippers nationally, will defend
his rebel class national title today
at Devil's Lake, Mich.
Goldsmith, of the Devil's Lake
Yacht Club, will compete' in a
field of 45. The previous high in
a national regatta has been 28.
Two Races Tomorrow
The rebel class of sailing vessel
is a fiberglas-plastic craft which
is small, light and fast. There will
be two races held today and one
tomorrow, the winner being the
one who finishes highest \overall
in the three.
During the regatta a trophy
will be presented to the associa-
tion for presentation to the win-
ner. The award will be made for
the first time to the 1958 chain-
pion at the spring meeting.
Goldsmith, who won the na-
tional nipper class championship
at the age of 11, has been an out-
standing sailor with the Michigan
club. He won the present rebel
championship at Put-in-Bay,
Ohio, in 1957.

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