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September 19, 1958 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-19

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TI

ANT

w 'r'i'+

?EGAN WITH OVERTHROW OF FAROUK:

Nasser"s

Dream: Making Islam Into Political Force

Prof. Davis Estimates Lo
From Fires at $100 Mii'

I E 'PLAN: Dorydream r Nightmre? j

By CHARLES STAFFORD
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Gamal Abdel Nasser, gadfly of
the tormented Middle East, is pur-
suing a dream: Transformation
of Islam, the religion of the Mos-
lems, into "an institution of great
political power and significance."
The overthrow of the Farouk
monarchy in Egypt was the first
step toward what Nasser calls "the
great objective." Ouster of the
British from Suez was another.
And perhaps the most important
to date was the union of Egypt
and Syria in, and federation of
Yemen with, the United Arab Re-
public.
Writes Philbsophy in Bookf
In the manner of Adolph Hit-+
ler, the world's most infamous
dreamer of modern times who set
forth his grand plan in the book,
"Mein Kampf," Nasser five years
ago outlined his dream in a- small,
book.
"Sometimes," he wrote, "I sit ini
my study reflecting . . . asking
myself: What is our positive role
in this troubled world, and where1
is the place in which we should
fulfill that role?
It seemed to him, Nasser wrote,t
that the Arab circle-from Egypt'
in the west to the Persian Gulf ini
the east, and from Aden in thet
south to northern Syria--is al
single entity. "So long as the re-i
gion, sharing the same conditions1
and problems, and the same fu-i
ture (and, however he tries toc
change his disguise, the same ene-f

my)--so long as this is true, why
do we scatter our efforts?
Arabs Have Three Strengths
The Arab circle, Nasser said,
has three sources of great
strength: Its ethnic ties, its "stra-
tegic position which embraces the
crossroads of the, world,"' and
"oil-a sinew of material civili-
zation without which all its ma-
chines would cease to function."
The second circle in which
Egypt should move, according to
Nasser, is Africa. "We cannot .
remain aloof from the terrible and
sanguinary conflict going on there
today between five million whites
and 200 million Africans. We can-
not do so for an important and
obvious reason: We are in Africa."
Nasser dreams of the day "when
I will find in Cairo a great Afri-
can institute dedicated to unveil-
ing to our view the dark reaches
of the continent, to creating in
our minds -an enlightened African
consciousness, and to sharing with
others from all over the world the
work of advancing the welfare of
the peoples of this continent."
Envisions Great Institution
It is the third 'circle of Nasser's
dream which encompasses a great
portion of the world. "In my
mind's eye," he wrote, "I saw all
the regions of the world which
Islam has reached. Then I found
myself saying that our view of the
pilgrimage must change. It should
not be regarded as only a ticket
of admission into paradise after
a long life, or as a means of buy-

ing forgiveness after a merry one.
It should become an institution of
great political power and signifi-
cance."
Mentioning the millions of Mos-
lems in Indonesia, China, Malaya,
Siam, Burma, the Middle East,
Pakistan and the Soviet Union,
Nasser wrote: .
"When I consider these hun-
dreds of millions united by a sin-
gle creed, I emerge with a sense of
the tremendous possibilities which
we might realize through the co-
operation of all those Muslims, a
cooperation going not beyond the
bounds of their natural loyalty to
their own countries, but nonethe-
less. enabling them and their broth-
era in faith to wield power wisely
and without limit."
Missed
Connections
DERBY, England (JP)-When
veteran trolley bus driver
George Eveans went on vaca-
tion a couple of weeks ago the
overhead trolley wires ran
down Corporation St.
The other day the route was
changed and wires removed.
Somebody forgot to tell
George. Today, George, the
bus and a load of passengers
went down Corporation. St.
The wire went down another
street.'

Last year $100 million went up
in smoke from the combination of
forest recreational areas, careless
people, and a dry summer, Prof.
Kenneth Davis, head of the Uni-
versity's department of forestry,
said recently.
Michigan's 1957 fire record was
one of the best in the- nation. "Just
because Michigan has a good rec-
ord doesn't mean we can relax,"
Prof. Davis says. "We always have
the shadow of a possible big fire
lurking over us and we should
never forget it." ;
Forestation Creates Hazard
Forestation and a general build
up of the natural forest has had a
great impact on the forest fire pic-
ture, Prof. Davis said. A new source
of fuel for fires is now available
and it also attracts more people
who want to build "a little cabin.
in the woods," he added.
Lakes states alone have produced
20 per cent more fuel for forest
fires through better forestry. New
staids of fine red pine plantations
are potential fire hazards as well
as timber producers, Prof. Davis
commented.
Prof. Davis said the "public is
more fire conscious, but with more
and more people building homes in
and near forests the danger of,
fire is still very much around."
New Aid Recently Available
Outstanding "breakthroughs"
have been developed in recent
years to aid in controlling and1
combatting forest fires, Prof. Davist
said.
The most important of thesef

V

developments, Prof. Davis says, is
the use of aircraft. "Airplanes can
now be used for detection of fires,
reconnaissance work, transporta-
tion of men and equipment, and
for extinguishing or retarding
flames,' he said.
Sodium-calcium-borate bombs,
which smother flames and slow
down forest fires, were mentioned
by Prof. Davis as means of check-
ing the spread of fires.
Rapid transportation of fire-
fighters to strategic ground loca-
tions is also possible with air-
plAnes. The planes are also used to
drop "smoke jumpers" whose job
it is to set up, in a short time, a
"front" to halt the flames.
Helicopters are also used to lay
water hoses across terrain inac-
cessable to men and machines.
Other scientific and technical
advances in the fire-fighting area
include air mass physics to study.
certain types of fires and their
origins, the study of lightning and
some -progress in diverting it, and
fire - weather forecasting, Prof.
Davis said.
The big problem, according to
Prof. Davis, is "beating the fire
to the punch." Getting the fire
while it's small and not allowing
it to get a good start were con-
sidered important by Davis.
Prof. Davis is the author of
"Forest Fire: Control and Use,"
the first United States textbook
on this subject. The book is sched-
uled for publication during Janu-
ary, 1959.

GAMAL ABDEL NASSER--Egypt's chief has three dreams: The unification of the Arab Republic
into a strong force; a voice in the future of Africa; and the modeling of Islam into an institution
of world power. The map above illustrates the progress of those dreams.

+ s +

II

Welcome to Ann Arbor-and to the Finest in Dining

g4

A

Me4
CHUCK WAGON
Extends a hearty welcome to
the University students
His restdurant is open to YOU from 9 A.M. to 11 P.M.
Fine Salads & Sandwiches - PIZZA'
CLOSED TUESDAYS

I

COTTAGE INN PIZZERIA,
FREE DELIVERY
"Real Italian Food is our Specialty"

* rITALIAN SPAGHETTI
* CHICKEN-IN-THE-BASKET
... to take out.
* THREE DECKER SANDWICHES
* HOME-MADE PIES
ANGELO'S RESTAURANT
1 100 E. Catherine . . OPEN 7 A.M.-8 P.M. . . . 7 days a week

Weekdays
10:30 A.M.- 2 Midnight
Phone N 03-5902

Friday and Saturday
10:30 A.M.-2 A.M.
512 E. Williams

METZGER'S
GERMAN RESTAURANT
offers
the BEST in Dinners
also
COMPLETE CARRY OUT SERVICE
203 E. Washington
Open daily 4 P.M.-midnight Closed Sundays
Martys Delicatessen
(only delicatessen in this area)
1104 S. University Phone NO 3-2944
Hot Pastrami * Lox & Bagel * Hot Corned Beef
ITALIAN SPAGHETTI -Prepared to Order

2045 PACKARD
Catering at Your Home or Hall

NO 2-1661
Henry Turner, Prop

.__ ....... :: ....... r. ...,..

PIZZA SPECIAL

1

The

GONDOLA'
LUNCHES .tDINNERS
COCKTAILS
Specializing In ITALIA DINAfERS
BANQUET ROOM AVAILABLE
Sunday Dinners Noon to 10 P.M.
1322 Washtenaw -Ypsilanti, Mich.
Open 10 A.M.-2 A.M. NEW Phone HUnter 3-4057

9 j'
G The Best in Oriental Cuisine I
~ ~ Our chefs are ready to prepare
o
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enjoyment. ,
eCAntonese and
Amermcan Food
Take-out Orders anytime
Closed Monday 118 WEST LIBERTY NO 2-5624
^ 0
eo<==>o no<= >o oC>o eo<=c>oe c= ae (r> o

Pizza and Chef's Salad . . .only 90c

To help you cut the

High Cost of Living

. . o

TAKE-OUTS and CATERING
Box Lnnches---Deluxe Banquets
HOURS: 6 AM. to 9 P.M. Monday thru'Saturday
CLOSED SUNDAY

We are

now offering
a Fast, Low-Cost
Self-Serve
FROM 11 A.M. 'TIL 9:00 P.M.
(Waiter Service as Usual)
from 9 "til midnite
The Home of FINE FOOD

M-

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For A Delicious Dinner

NI

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FAMILY STYLE DINNERS

AIR CONDITIONED

120 E. LIBERTY

I"

r
Ito
i .
cH P

in Ann.Arbor

43%

f

11

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
t -u 9t9ne9,,
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional
Italian dish
IPIZZAI
will.be served daily in
"THE DUCHESS ROOM"
from 11 A.M. to 1 A.M.
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and
baked in new modern ovens to give you
the "best tasting pizza in town."
TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE

Lm- "

Chicken

11

Dine at WEBER'S

..

The Finest in

Steaks

Chops
* Seafood

ii
1i
,

Downtown Dining
" PRIME STEAKS
" TURKEY & CHICKEN,

HOMESTYLE COOKING
that will make any day

Delelous
STEAK, CHICKEN,
SEAFOOD
DINNERS

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Your Favorite
BEER, WINE,
and
CHAMPAGNU

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,/

complete

BANQUET HALL AVAILABLE
for all your.hGrouphAeeds

Try Our Tempting Homemade Pastries

I

I

Jill

#ii

ill

11

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