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September 19, 1958 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY IMIDAY,

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BIG TEN:
Teams Plan Defenses
For Final Scrimmages
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (P)--End I
Norm Craft appeared to have won when the workout turned to of-
the kick-off assignment on the fense.
Indiana football squad today as
the Hoosiers continued to work on EVANSTON, Ill. (P) - Willmer
defense against the Notre Dame Fowler, first string right halfback,
style offense for the opening suffered a leg bruise today during
game. an hour-long scrimmage by
Tailback Norm Mackin, still Northwestern's football squad.
hobbling from a knee injury suf- Trainers figured the injury will
fered in last weekend's scrim- keep Fowler out of Saturday's in-
mage, was held out of a 40-minute trasquad game.
scrimmage and was given little * *
chance of being ready for the MINNEAPOLIS 03)-- Quarter-
opener. backs Jim Reese and Larry John-
+ son alternated in a long passing
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. _W) - Illinois' session today as Minnesota sharp-
football team held a defensive ened the bread-and-butter plays
scrimmage today, viewing some of of its split T offense.
the single wing plays UCLA is ex- Sophomore Pepper Lysaker,
pected to employ in their Sept. 27 moved up to first team left half
opener here. yesterday, kept the job for at
Mainly, the Illini tried to bat least another day. His presence in
down spasses from pet UCLA aerial the No. 1 backfield temporarily
formations. gave the gophers three sophomore
* starting backs - Lysaker, Right
IOWA CITY, Iowa (P) -- The Half Bile Kauth and Fullback
Iowa football team had mixed Roger Hagberg.t
drills on offense and defense to- A
day in preparation for another LAFAYETTE, Ind. (-) - Coach
full game scrimmage in the sta- JackhMollenkopf gave,Junior Ter-
dium Saturday: ry Sheehan his first chance with.
Two-a-day practice sessions the No. 1 unit at the pivot posi-
will end tomorrow with school tion today as Purdue concentrat-
opening next week. ed on offensive tactics in a one-
Halfback Geno Sessi who has hour scrimmage session.
been running with the third team
on a limited basis said he will 'B
have an operation on his bad knee
tomorrow and will sit out the
season to save two years of eligi-
bility. He was a sophomore last
MADISON, Wis (W) - "They're
coming, it was a good workout," l O re er
Coach Milt Bruhn said today aft-
er his Wisconsin football team Southern California, Michigan's
bumped happily through a bruis- opening day opponent next Satur-
ing defensive scrimmage, day, hosts rugged Oregon State
Defense probably will be a tonight at Los Angeles in the first
strong point of the Badgers this big battle on the West Coast.a
season, and the first two units In the stands, getting a careful
showed they intend to make it look at Southern Cal, will be,
so as they racked up the reserves Michigan Assistants Don Dufek
in the spirited drill. and Matt Patanelli. They left yes-
S t a r t in g Quarterback Dale terday by plane from Ann Arbor.
Hackbart, slowed by a leg injury, Last year Michigan bested the
was the only first-stringer held Trojans, 16-6, on the Coast.
out of the defensive drill. But he Southern Cal is reported to have
took up running assignments four sophomores in its starting
lineup, including halfback Angelo
Coia (:09.5 in the 100 and 195
Spoundsiand 'Mike McKeever, a
highly-publicized guard. McKeev-
er's- twin brother Marlin is a star
end.
The 'Trojans, still stunned by a
1-9-0 record from 1957, are under-
dogs to the Oregonians-ranked
12th in the Associated Press pre-
season poll.
Last year the Beavers tripped up
Southern Cal, 20-0, for their first
win in the series since 1946. Ore-
gon State posted a 8-2-0 mark in
1957.

Braves Top
Cardinals,;
Chisox Win
ST. LOUIS (A') - The Mil-
waukee Braves lowered their
"magic number to twow ith a
9-3 defeat of the St. Louis Car-
dinals last night produced by 13
hits off the Braves big bats.
Ex-Cardinal Red Schoendienst
hit safely four out of five times
including three doubles.
Now any combination of two
Brave victories or two Pittsburgh
Pirates losses will bring a Na-
tional League pennant to Mil-
waukee for the second season in
a row.
The Braves spotted the Cards
two runs in the first inning but
came back with a four-run, five-
hit attack in the fourth, knock-
ing Red Bird Starter Sad Sam
Jones out of the box and giving
winning pitcher Bob Rush a lead
he never lost. Rush is now 10-6
for the season.
* * *
CHICAGO () - Brilliant relief
pitching by Barry Latman, 22-
year-old right hander, gave the
Chicago White Sox a 6 to 2 vic-
tory over the Baltimore Prioles
yesterday.
Latman relieved veteran Ray
Moore with two runs in, one out
and two on base in the first inn-
ing. Relying chiefly on a blazing
fast ball he gave up only three
hits until he walked. the first man
in the ninth. Turk Lown relieved
him then and retired three- in a
row.
KANSAS CITY, (A) - Back-to-
back homers. by Bill Tuttle and
Roger Maris in the first inning
started the Kansas City Athletics
off to a 4-1 verdict over the Bos-
ton Red Sox behind the five-hit
pitching of Bud Daley yesterday.
Bob Cerv also came through
with a singleton homer for the A's-
in the'eighth, his 37th of the sea-
son. The Sox scored their lone
tally on a home run by catcher
Pete Daly in the second.

WILMER FOWLER
. . . Injury victim
Tigers Call
On Charleston
DETROIT () - The Detroit
Tigers today called up three play-
ers from their Charleston farm
club, ousted a day ago in the
American Association playoffs.
The Tigers recalled First Base-
man Larry Osborne and Pitcher
Don Lee.
At the same time, the farm club
purchased thecontract of pitcher
Jerry Davie.
Davie was the league's leading
pitchet this year, his 17-5 record
and 2.45 earned run average were
the best in the association. He is
a 25-year-old righthander from
Garden City, Mich.
Lee was with the Tigers briefly
in 1957. This year he was 14-7 at
Charleston with a 2.95 earned run
average, fourth best in the league.

INSIDE CHATTER
... by SI COLEMAN
The Long Hot Summer

IT WAS A long hot summer. But it was just a little longer and
perhaps hotter to somie extent' for one group of individuals than
for anyone else. The group I refer to is linked by a common enter-
prise. They are the men who operate the facets of minor league base-
ball.
These men deserve a lot of praise. They also should be given some
, pity because they are endeavoring to promote what I think is a dying
business. In fact, if the present trendcontinues, the business will no
longer be dying, it will be dead. And this would be one of the major
catastrophes to have ever occurred in the world of sports,
Baseball, has transgressed through a long, and certainly colorful
history. It has licked some formidable problems. It overcame. the.
scandal of the Black Sox in 1919 and 1920. It worked out a touchy
problem concerning honus babies. This past summer it undertook
to curb the problem of the bean ball. Segregation in the major
leagues is no longer the touchy subject it had once been. All of these
issues were major ones, and there was much bickering and car'ing
on before they were caged. But the most serious problem-the rescue
of minor league baseball-still remains and is growing larger day by
day. Whether minor league activity is reinvigorated or whether, it is
left to die remains to be seen.
Minor leagues were originated and expanded for two principal
reasons. Major league teams used them as places to which they could
send players who needed game experience. And they gave baseball
lovers an opportunity to watch the game in locations where major
league baseball could not be seen. Farm systems reached their height
-under the extensive organization set up by Branch Rickey and. tih
St. LouisCards. The Dodgers and Yankees and a fewothers followed
- the pattern. Some teams, such as the Washington Senators never
really had any kind of a farm system and still don't. Players like Stan
Musial, Gil Hodges and Mickey Mantle came up through the ranks of
Class C and D, But today players aren't being sent in abundance to
those classes. They are put in Class B leagues or higher right at the
1 start of their professional careers. There ' just aren't enough lower
class teams to handle all the players that actually belong there,
Television Responsible ...
HAT IS THE principal reason for'the downfall of the minors?
sRather than just one main reason- for the downfall, there are
two chief causes that explain why the minors are in such sad shape.,
The most obvious inanimate culprit is television. To see major league
baseball is no longer the luxury it had once been. One no longer has
to travel hundreds of miles to see Mays or Williams. The reason-
television now brings you baseball every day of the week., And if you
are not in a region where you can pick up- the channels on weekdays,
at least- you are probably in an area where you can see the game of
the week every' weekend. One comment, trite, but nevertheless true,
is: Why should- I go out to see the local team play when I can watch
a major league game on television? This comment is justified in many
ways and when it is repeated during one season by millions of fan
all across the country, minor league attendance is bound to suffer.
With the attendance on the downgrade, the minors will suffer
financially. The major league team hesitates to support a losing
- proposition, and nobody can blame them.
Let's take a closer look at the second reason for pessimism In
discussing minor leagues. This second cause has been gaining primary
importance in recent years, and the immediate future promises the
same trend. I refer to the shift of major league franchises.
The most drastic shift of course occurred this past, summer when
Brooklyn and New York traveled cross-country and moved to Los
Angeles and San Francisco. That 3,000-mile move almost completely
ruined the Pacific Coast League. The Coast League was awarded a
$900,000 indemnity but the money didn't help the situation. The
Dodgers bumped the Los Angeles Angels and the Hollywood Stars
while the Giants replaced the San Francisco Seals. The removal of
three key PCL cities in turn caused other unfortunate develppments.
Hollywood moved to, Salt Lake City which had been the key city in
the Pioneer League (Class C) San Francisco meanwhile knocked the
prop out of,- the Arizona-Mexico (C) League when it moVed into
Phoenix. This. continuous pushing around appears as though it will
continue since other major league teams are considering moving.
Solution Possible .1..
THERE IS NO DOUBT that the situation is dismal. People every.
where are asking-is there a solution? This reporter thinks there
is. Baseball is too great-of a sport to let itself disintegrate. One thing is
certain-major league teams cannot. prosper' as long as the minor
leagues continue to disappear. Baseball officials will- not let this
happen. One of the first steps toward a solution is to realize that
baseball is definitely a business as well as a sport. As such, it must
be managed in a business-like manner. Rather than private owners
of small minor league teams who can only absorb losses up to a
certain and usually low level, the major league organizations should
completely undertake ithe management of the smaller outfits. Working
agreements which are common substitutes today for strong farm
systems are rarely satisfactory.
Before it is too late the major league officials must realize that
they need strong minor leagues for their own existence. They must
endeavor to make them strong. When that day arrives we will once.
again be able .to say that baseball has solved -another of the major
issues which have, dotted its history and which will undoubtedly crop
up again in the future.

'

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
New York 89 57 .610 -
Chicago 78 67 .538 10%
Detroit 73 71 .507 15
Cleveland 71 73 .493 17
Boston 71 74 .490 17Y2
Kansas City 69 77 .473 20
Baltimore 67 77 .465 21
Washington 61 83 .424 27
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 4, Boston 1
Chicago 6, Baltimore 2
(Only games scheduled)
TODAM3S GAMES
New York at Baltimore (N)
Washington at Boston (N)
Chicago at Kansas City (N)
Cleveland at Detroit

l
l

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
Milwaukee 38 59 .598 -
Pittsburgh 82 65 .558 6
San Francisco 75 71 .514 121
Cicinnati 74 74 50 14
St. Louis 70 76 .479 17
Chicago 67 79 .459 20
Los Angeles 67 79 .459 20f
Philadelphia 63 83 .432 24
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 3 (N)
(Only games scheduled)
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at St. Louis (N)
Los Angeles at Chicago
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (N)
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (N)

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