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September 19, 1958 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY 1

Union Madness
,20
7:QO
MOVIES- CARNIVAL
HI-Fl CONCERTR
DANCERT
JAZZ CONCERT

Mead Calls Graduate Studies
Wage-Improvement Schools
Graduate school has become a viewed as training sergeants
cross between a professional whose aim Is to keep people from
school and a continuation school attaining some goal, she said.
married people attend to improve "This would seem to be a period
their wage-earning capacity, Prof. when the students themselves.
Margaret Mead, said last; night at will have, to' take the initiative in
the Graduate School Convocation what they want from graduate
Exercises in the Rackham Lec- school, and not rely on the ii-
ture Hall. tiative of a faculty, many of whom
Speaking of "The Challenge of are still happily teaching a kind of
Graduate Studies," Prof. Mead, of student who no longer exists," she
the anthropology department of said.
Columbia University, said the. em-
phasis+ in graduate schools 'has To prevent graduate students
changed from a student expecta- from relyingon an out-dated fac-.
tion of a few years to linger and uty, Prof. Mead suggested that
learn, "to an overwhelming em- students be allowed to participate
phasis upon the desirability of in real, progressive research pro-
getting through and getting out." grams, rather than be given well'
Many parts of almost all grad- paid but low level work to attract
uat scoos tda; sillber, heand support them. She further
um schools toda sll dbar th said that graduate students must
armprinwhof the WorlyWare" also be made to feel a part of a
army, in which the faculty are d n mm it

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uyila cuc nun y oZ scnolars,
rather than subordinate members
of a highly organized educating
machine.
Forming alliances with one's
contemporaries as well as with
undergraduates in one's own field
might effect new farms of teach-
ing and learning, Prof. Mead
added, as well as "reinstate an
institution without which no tra-
ditional scholarship has ever
flourished - the long, informal
exploratory conversations among
friends - without which the arts
wither and the imagination dries
up."
Associate curator of the Ameri-
can Museum of Natural History
in New York, Prof. Mead is also
the author of many books, in-
cluding "Growing Up in New
Guinea" and "Coming of Age in
Samoa.

'U' Experts
Investigate
Conception
Some of the answers to the
problem' of sterility have been
found in the human. blood stream
by a team of University scientists.
In many cases where apparent-
ly physically fit couples are in-
fertile, incompatibility exists be-
tween wife andhusband with re-
spect to the ABC blood group sys-
tem, according to Prof. Samuel
Behrman of the gynecology de-
partment and. John. Buettner-
Janusch, research assistant in the
anthropology laboratory.
Blood Types Contribute
Typically, of those who report-
ed to the gynecology department
of the University Medical Center
for blood and saliva tests, the
wife was blood type O, the hus-
band A. This means that the
wife's blood contained a natural
antibody for the husband's-
which prevented pregnancy by
destroyingered blood cells in the
fetus.
The scientists also learned of a
peculiar pattern of antigen se-
cretion among childless couples
which differs greatly from fertile
couples. This pattern, they theor-
ized, may be related to destruc-
tion of male sperm before concep-.
tion is obtained.
Prof. SpuhIer Directed Study
Prof. James N. Spuhler, acting
chairman of the anthropology
department, directed the project
which is sponsored by the United
States Public. Health Service.
In beginning the experiment,
scientists scanned Medical Center
records of the past decade per-
taining to couples with fertility
problems, none of which had ex-
perienced pregnancy.
Six h u n d r e d questionnaires,
were sent to these persons, 102
couples volunteering to visit the
Center for blood and saliva tests.
A second control group was also
selected which included 117
couples d u b b e d "the fertile
series." These were marriages
which produced three or more
children each.
Blood analysis 'turned up evi-.
dence of blood system incompati-
bility among the childless couples.'
Saliva analysis from both
groups also turned up- a peculiar
pattern of antigen secretion:
among the childless couples.
No cures or corrective measures

The Botanical Gardens are run
on a business basis, Prof. Norman
explained. "Classes order- what
they are going to need for next
semester and we grow them," he
said. Pointing to a patch . of rice
plants, Prof. Norman said one
student was studying the anato-
my and development of rice ..
with no plans for growing it as
a native plant in Ann Arbor, he
chuckled.
Outside, Prof. Norman has
evening primrose plants in sep-
arate, decomposable paper pots.
"The evening primrose is a good
plant for botanists to study in-
heritance characteristics," he in-
dicated.
In the Garden's cactus house
Prof. Norman gestured toward a
three-foot plant. "That plant is
under suspicion," he said. "We
think it's been dead for two years
but nothing shows on the out-
side yet, although the inner core
may be dead and hollow."
Have Crinum From Bikini
In the subtropical house of the
Gardens is a crinum, a, plant
whose bulb came from the island
of Bikini. The bulb is about the
shape of a tulip but is the size
of a football, Prof. Norman said.
Figs, bananas, mangos, papaya,
and pineapple plants are among
the inhabitants of the tropical
room. "Unfortunately someone
has harvested the only pineapple
that we had, Prof. Norman said.
The Botanical Gardens now has
a plant growing that a few .years
ago was known only as a fossil.
The plant, Meta Sequoia, was dis-
covered growing 'in a remote area
of China. Seedlings have been
transplanted and now the Uni-
versity's gardens has cuttings.
Indicating a small,:spindly tree
a few feet tall, Prof. Normanr
called it a redwood. Although not
very majestic the small tree has

'U' BOTANICAL GARDENS:
GeraniumsExotic Plants Grow Togeti
By RALPH HANGER
Scattered among the exotic
varieties of plants growing in the *
University's Botanical Garden is .
the common geranium.
The geranium is studied for its /~
starch production by various # F
botany classes according to Dr.
Geoffrey Norman, Director of the
Botanical Gardens. "We also, have
tobacco plants here," Prof.,Nor-
man said, "It's a good plant. for
studying the movement of native
Run Businesslike"

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have been learned, Prof. BehrmanJ
warned.

Our LAW section

is staffed by

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replaced the "telephone pole" size
one that we had to continually
trim to keep, from, going through
the roof," Prof. Norman said.
Have Rare Welwitschia,
Another r mre plant and the
pride of the Gardens, according
to Prof. Norman is the Welwit-
schia, a plant that grows only in
a limited. area' of German South.
Africa. The tremendous climatic
variance during a single day
makes the Welwitschia a unique
plant. Possessing only two true
leaves that become extremely long
and torn and ragged, the plant
lives, for 20 years before flower-
ing.
The Botanical Gardens now has
three small plants growing in
drainpipe sections because of the
deep roots which develop.

You're Safe,'
LANSING (P)--Benny Doster
Was being tried in circuit' court
for stealing a safe.
Police claimed he and a friend
hauled it out of a grocery store
into the trunk of a car.
Duster'said he found it in a
dump.
Policesaid one man couldn't
lift the safe. Doster offered yes-
terday to demonstrate.
He heaved at the 600-pound
safe, in court as evidence. It
toppled off a dolly, smashing
three holes in the courtroom
floor. Six policemen were need-
ed to lift it back.
Doster was convicted.

0

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