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September 18, 1958 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ilosson Says Congress Ignored Party Lines

The 85th Congress was notable'
hiefly for its disregard of party
.nes, University historian Prof.
reston W. Slosson recently de-
lared.
This disregard resulted primarily
rom the fact that Congressional
ills did not correspond, to party
ivisions, and secondarily from the
act that the President and Con-
ress were of different parties,
'rof. Siosson explained.
Prof. Slosson spoke on WUOM-
M radio program, "Background."
'he other participant in the panel
iscussion was Prof. John P. White
f the political science depart-
nent.
'While discussing the 86th Con-

gress, Prof. Slosson said that any
predictions on what the next con-
gress will do would depend upon
the coming elections. Prof. White
then added that chances are that
Congress will remain Democratic.
Regardless of what party is in
control, however, the next Con-
gress probably will be more liberal,
White continued. He considered
this likely because so many con-
se'vative Republicans are retiring
this year.
"The conservatives who blocked
a labor reform bill during this last
session of Congress on hopes that
they will get a more conservative

Congress next time are in for a
disappointment," he declared.
Rest Important Bills
Both Prof. Slosson and Prof.
White agreed that the most im-
portant legislation which was
passed by the 85th Congress were
the bills concerning civil rights,
defense department reorganization,
reciprocal trade extension, and
Alaskan statehood.
"This is the first time we have
granted statehood to a non-con-
tiguous area, one not part of the
continental United States," Prof.
Slosson said.
White said Hawaii's admission
appears inevitable in the very near

future and predicted that it prob- cause Congress tended to agree

ably will become a state during the
next session of Congress.
Trade Bill Acclaimed
The reciprocal trade bill was
remarkable, White maintained,
because the President was able to
get it extended for four years
during a period when recession
was a real problem.
But. looking at President Dwight
D. Eisenhower's record with Con-
gress, White noted that what the
President requested and what he
got corresponded quite closely,,
"not especially because he exer-
cised vigorous leadership, but be-

with him. I
"The leadership of both the
House and Senate was under the
control of moderates and there-
fore there was a broad community
of agreement between the Presi-
dent and Congressional leaders,"
White declared.
As the most outstanding failure
of the 85th Congress, Prof. Slosson
noted the lack of any significant
labor legislation. The Kennedy-
Ives anti-racketeering bill, which
was to make labor unions more
responsible for the handling of
firiances died in the House.

Professor's
t Works-
On Display
University Prof. Jack A. Garbutt
of the architecture college is ex-
hibitin; a collection of his oil
paintings, drawings and tempera
paintings through Sept. .28 at the
Art Center in Kalamazoo.
The works were produced in Ann
Arbor on his return from a trip to
Utah last summer. The trip was
financed by a Rackham grant.
The exhibition of about 25 ob-
jects includes semi-abstractions of
natural wood and. rock forma-
tions.

MICHIGAN SEAL

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