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September 18, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

New Course
To Survey
Soviet Union
An interdepartmental-survey of
the Soviet Union will be offered to
upperclassmen this fall for the
first time during the regular
school year.
The Russian survey course is
one of only two or three such
courses offered on an interdepart-
mental basis in American univer-
sities.
Numbered 195 in the' economics,
geography, history and political
science departments and 185 in
the Slavic languages and litera-
ture departments, the course is
i~ve fnr twn houis dtit

AWAITS PROCEDURE:
University To Participate
In Federal Loan Project

The University is ready to par-
ticipate with. the Federal govern-
ment in launching a $900,000,000
aid to education program, Prof.
Robert Williams,, assistant dean
of faculties, said yesterday.
Under the program, an offspring
of the National Defense Education
Act passed in July, students here
would receive an increased number
of "long-term, low interest" loans,
supported largely by Federal funds.
Before going ahead with the
program, the University is await-
ing a manual of procedures for
distributinguthe loans,nowbeing
prepared by Lloyd Blauch, deputy
commissioner of the United States
Office of Education, Prof. Wil-
liams reported.
He added that "reliable sources
in Washington have attached high
priority to- the section of the edu-
cation act dealing with loans.
According to the act, the maxi-

gle nfor to ra crecz.
It will be taught by Prof. Wil-
liamBallis, chairman of :the group
N V . andmember of the political sci-
ence staff; Prof. George Kish of
the geography department; Prof.
A. A. Lobanov-Rostovsky of the
BUDGET TERMS TO STUDENTS history department and Professors
Deming Brown and Horace W.
Dewey of the Slavic languages and
literature department.
The survey "course was given a
OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS "trial run" during the summer
session and was very well received
by the 100 students who took it,
Prof. Ballis said
The purpose of the course is to
present "i capsule form the es-
sential aspects of the Soviet Un-
514-16 E. vW iliams ion, how it developed, how it
operates and what influence it
has. on the world," he explained.
Prof. Ballis received a number
of letters from students who took
C laSsi le S the Russian survey course this
D aliy Csummer. One person wrote she was
"astounded at the number of
r ng Q uick Results things which. relate to the mate-
rial presented."

i

F
l
C

Art PritLoant
To Open Soon
The Office of Student Affairs is
again offering students the op-
portunity of renting art prints on
a semesterly basis.
For a small fee the student may
choose from a variety, of framed
pictures representing various art-
ists and styles.
The prints will be on display
from 1 to 5 p.m. September 25 and
26 and from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and
1 to 5 p.m. September 27 in Rm.
528 of the Student Activities
Building.

mum Federal contribution to any
institution will be 80 per cent': of
capital funds, with a limit of
$250,000 to any institution during
a fiscal year.
Each loan program, the act
reads, "will be administered by the
college or university in practically
the same way that existing loan
programs are administered at the
present time."
At, the University, student loans
are presently granted when stu-
dent applications are considered
valid by administration officials.
"Loans to college students can-
not exceed $1,000 for a single
academic year nor a total of $5,000
to any one student" the act con-
tinues.
Listed as Title III in the educa-
tion act, the loan program was
originally proposed by Michigan
congressmen Robert Griffin (9th
district) and Robert McIntosh
(7th district) to fill the gap in
Federal grants =left hy the termina-
tion of the G.I. Bill.
The' act, whiich also; includes
scholarships; fellowships and other
aids to education, is geared for
those studerits having aptitudes
for science, mathematics, and
foreign languages.:
Thus far, $40,000,000 has been
appropriated by Congress. The re-
mainder of the $900,000,000 will be
distributed.
Congress appropriated $40,000,-
000 of the called-for $900,000,000
before concluding last month.
Losh Explains
Harvest Moon
The harvest moon, which will'
appear on September 27, often
seems larger than usual and has
a reddish looks near the horizon,
according to Prof. Hazel M. Losh7
of the astronomy .department. I
The reddish appearance, she ex-
plained, is caused by molecules of
air and suspended dust particles
which scatter the light, but scatter
blue rays more than red ones,1
combined with a greater dustiness
which prevails in the atmosphere1
at this time of the year.;-.
Prof. Losh attributed the har-
vest moon's larger size to an opti-
cal illusion. "The 'growth'," she,
said, "has nothing to do with the
moon itself, but is caused by com-]
parison with terrestrial objectss
when it is low on the horizon." 1

'U To Offer
Computing
Class Again
A one-hour course on Elemen-
tary Computer Techniques will
again be offered this fall on a
non-credit basis.
The course, unlisted in the Time
Schedule, will be taught by Prof.
Bernard A. Galler of the mathe-
matics department.
"It is designed to teach students
to communicate with computers
using ordinary algebraic language,"
Prof. Galler explained. The ma-
chine "accepts this language and
generates its own set of instruc-
tions," he continued.
Students taking the course will
choose problems to solve by means
of this language.
The computer course is open to
anyone with a background of one
year of college mathematics, but
is, primarily for undergraduates.'
Starting September 24, the
course will meet at 4 p.m. Wednes-
days in 311 West Engineering
Bullding, h
No registration is required.
Botanists Tell
Of scovery
In Rice Stems
Long-stemmed rice can be grown
and, in fact, has been developed
by University botanists Peter B.
Kaufman, curator of the Botanical
Gardens, and- his assistant Mrs.
Laura Tweedie Roberts.
Reporting to the annual session
of the American Institute of Bio-
logical.Sciences, Dr. Kaufman and
Mrs. Roberts said the basic prob-
lem of stem mechanism in the
elongation still remains unan-
swered. '
They said they are studying the
problem of stem elongation from
five angles.
These are: treating rice ,shoots,
which have been cut off and then
treated with growth ,regulators;
spraying plants with various
growth hormones; removing stems;
from shoots, cutting, them up, and
treating them while In solution.
with various growth substances;
experimenting with plants placed
horizontally to retard or accelerate
their upward growth; and analyz-
ing rice stems in an attempt to1
find which "native hormones area
actively engaged in stem elonga-
tion.

Religious Orientation Tall
rogrammed for Tonight
The importance of religion in
the life of the student will be "life values" during his stay at
emphasized tonight as the fresh- University, C. Grey Austin, A
men attend a Religious Orientation sistant Coordinator of Religi
Meeting at 8:15 p.m. in HillAudi- Affairs, said.
torium~ As an, intioduction, DeW:i
The Interdenominational gather- Baldwin, coordinator of Religio
ing is designed to impress the stu- Affairs, will speak briefly on t
dent with the need to consider present role of "Religion at Mict

the
As-
ous
istt
ous
the
hi-

New Library
To Shor ten,
Due to a reduced budget, two
new economy measures have been
announced by the Undergraduate
Library for this year.
The library will temporarily
operate on shorter hours as an
economy measure. Today and to-
morrow the building will be open
from 9.a.m. to 5 p.m.
Beginning Monday, the library
will be open from 9 a.m. to 10,p.m.
Monday through Thursday, from 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday, and from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. On
Sunday the. library will be'open
only from 2 tb 10p.m.
Also due to fewer funds; all.
books will be charged out on the
first floor, instead of on all three
floors as; in the past year, ' accord-
ing to Roberta 'C. Keniston, under-f
graduate librarian.;
"We are. sorry about these in-
conveniences to the students and
rega'rd them as only temporary
measures, Mrs. Keniston paid.
Last year, the first in the opera-
tion of the $3 million structure,
more than 500 books were taken
from the open shelves of the build-
ing, according to Mrs. Keniston.
This figure represents a loss of,
about one per cent of the library's
total collection and is'the final re-
sult after all the.books which were
returned during the summer were'
considered.
The losses were quite general
throughout the collection and
were not concentrated in any
special fields or patterns, she said.
A very small percentage were
reference and overnight -books-
the vast majority were on the
regular two week circulation list.
"We were quite distressed about
the number of books that were
taken from the library so soon
after its opening," Mrs. Keniston4
added.

gan."
Discussions Scheduled
Participation in a religious group
and serious evaluation of spiritual
goals by the student will be dis-
cussed and the importance of such
activity stressed from the view-
points of a faculty member, Prof.
George Peek of the political sci-
ence department; Norman Miller,
'61L, a member of the Roman
Catholic Newman Foundation an
Geor ge Romney, president o
American Motors. Romney's talk
will be entitled "If I Were Be-
ginning."
The University orientation pro-
gram has in previous yearsyex-
cluded an interdenominationa re-
ligious program from its schedule.
It was left to the individual reli-
gious groups on campus to orient
the freshmen to their goals and
activities and acquaint .him with
the place religion should - take in
the.student'p life.
This year the University has
inaugurated the religious emphasis
night, Austin said, "because of the
belief that it is just as important
to begin to orientithe freshmen to
the value side of campus life" as
it is to orient them to the social
and academic aspects.
Supplement Other Programs
The University-sponsored meet-
ing will not replace the special
freshmen programs of the separate
religious organizations on campus,
but is meant to supplement them.
A large majority of the groups
have scheduled open houses early
this evening and programs follow-
ing the mass meeting in Hill
Auditorium to acquaint the in-
coming student with the activitief
of his own religious group.
Sculpture Gift
For Library
Due in, October
The controversial sculpture
given to' the University by the
Class of 1958 will be erected in the
lobby of the undergraduate library

iA

MAKAKT WEBSTER SIR JOHN GLUBB SIR JOHN GIELGUD ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
U NIVE RSITY 'OF MICHIGAN HILL AUDITORIUM
Seven 1958
Outstanding " PMT1959
REDUCEDCPRICESTSTUENTS!

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no later than October 15, according
-oto Lynn W. Fry, University archi-
nPThe statue is now at the studio
of its creator, Prof. Thomas F.
McClure of. the architectureand
design school. It will remain there
Dr. Margaret Mead, anthropol- until the contractors who built the
ogist from the American Museum library receive a specially ordered
of Natural History, will speak at granite slab for the base of the
the Rackham School of Graduate statue.
Studies Convocation Exercises at As soon as the base is con-
8 p.m. tonight in the Rackham structed and work is done on some
Lecture Hall. of the panels in the lobby, the
Her topic will be "The Challenge statute will be erected a;s planned.
of Graduate Studies." ,A reception The modernistic sculpture, which
will be held in the Assembly Hall is approximately 71/2 feet tall and
following the exerecises. 7 feet wide, is constructed of thin.
Tlhe program. is open to the bronze pieces which are coated
public, with silver. *.

THE STYLE MAJOR CREATES
NEW STYLE MASTERPIECES IN

TENNESSEEWILliAM' DIAL
PULITZER RItZE PLAY STAT NO 2316

EDDIE DOWLING

SCOTTISH
IMPORT
SPORT
COATS
Handsome
examples of
Scottish weaving
artistry ... loomed
in an Edinburgh
mill that dates from
1649. In exclusive
Varsity Town 1958
tones and trirm,
pleasure-inspiring
models.
$39.50
Related-ton Slacks

(S ' ' >
.; t_{
;;ce
i"

DIAL
NO 2-2513

lmean ¢I li

Continuous
m Daily
from 1 'PM

to

ENDING THURSDAY

A

Francoise Sagan's
CERTAIN SMILE"

STARTS FRIDAY
Pre-Release Showing
"HOUSEBOAT".
CARY GRANT SOPHIA LOREN
Ann Arbor Sees It First!

ANTHONY NUTTING

Dial
8-6416

Wrmli2L

Weekdays
at
7 and 9 P.M.

U - U I ... - - U * ..in m. i~ rrnLIAkIr~rl

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