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September 17, 1958 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t

T

ity of districts integrated

: ..:..

,0

MD.
16.51

. .
3,7%

GIAN DAILY'
Rivers Add Extra Water
To Great Lakes-runk

"For BOZAK Speakers
it's AUDIO SUPPLY"

The diversion of water into the
Chicago Ship Canal from' the
Great Lakes is more than com-
pensated for by increased diversion
into Lake Superior, from- rivers
formerly flowing into Hudson Bay,
according to Ivan W. Brunk,
supervising meteorologist at the
Chicago Weather Bureau.
In a paper presented at the Uni-
versity recently, Brunk said that
the: water diVerted into the canal
totaled 1,500 cubic feet per second
plus the same amount for domestic
plumbing.w
"This diversion is more than
compensated for at present by
some 5,000 cubic feet per second
which flows into Lake Superior,"
he said, addressing some 150 peo-
ple attending the second national
Conference on Applied Meterology:
Engineering.s
In discussing piecipitatioA and
the levels of Lake Michigan and
Lake Huron, Brunk said the pre-
cipitation of one calendar year is
of relatively greater importance
than other years in its effect, and
a correlation extends back at least
to the third year.

He said that water which fell
two or three years prior to a given
time still can influence the lake'
levels because the water takes that
long to travel underground into
the Great Lakes.

AUDIO SUPPLY
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Z O TEJ CANOE LIVERY.
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k

itegration Proceeds Slowly in South

..

I

By The Associated Press .
F'our years after the historic
preme Court decision against
blic school segregation, South- p
n school bells for the' most part g
11 ring with a double tone, call-t
g whites and Negroes to separate,
hools.

North Carolinr and Arkan as,
with a somewhat larger population!
percentage of Negroes than either'
EPlorida or Virginia, have had scat-
tered instances of integration but
have joined their Southern sisters
n adopting legislation to offset or
slow down the process.
Show Scattered Integrat.ion

There has been some progress'
ward integration in the border,
ates, but not as much' as in
revious years, and none at all in
se Deep South states where legis-
tures have been stiffening their
pposition to the integration deci-
on.'
As the accompanying map shows,
o Southern. state where Negroes
omprise 'more than 30 per cent
fthe population has integrated a.
angle public school, nor has Vir-
oula, with 22.1 per cent Negro
3pulation, nor Florida, with 21.8

l1

According to the Southern Edu-
cation Reporting Service, a non-
profit organization. which charts
integration progress, the 11 South-
ern states showing the greatest
resistance to the desegregation de-
cision have enacted a total of 196
state laws 'in the 'past four years
to prevent or controlintegration.
These laws take .a variety of
forms: Abolish schools, school dis-
tricts or even. whole state systems
that integrate; provide state funds

for- parents who Wish to, avoid
sending thenr children to inte-
grated'" schools; deny funds to
school districts that integrate;,
close schools where fed ral 'troops
are used to enforce integration;.
repeal .compulsory attendance
laws; !empower superintendents to
assign :pupils to. specific schools;
sell or lease school' facilities to
private operators" in' event of
court-ordered. itegration.
The four most common -types.
of legislation adopted by these
states are charted at the bottom
of the map. Only Louisiana and
Virginia have adopted all 'four.
Integration Slowing Down.
As schools open this year, q77 of
the approximately 3,000 school,
districts in :the- states shown on
the map will have 'begun or ac,
complished integration. This com-

pares with a total of 38 last year
and 208' two years ago. Except for
a few districts in Arkansas, Ten-
nessee and North Carolina, virtu-
ally all integration progress since
1M56 has taken place in the border
states; where resistance was less
strong from the start.
According to the Southern Edu-
catiouiReporting Service, less than'
400,000 of the nearly three million
Negroes enrolled in. Southern pub-
lic schools will be in integrated
situations.
Some 150 court cases dealing
with .school segregation have been
filed, since the 1954 high court
decnsion, and in addition to Little1
Rock, major tests are looming in
New .Orleans; Dallas; Houston;
Miami; Knoxville, Tenn.; Nor-
'folk, Va.; Atlanta, and Raleigh,
N. C.

Books and Supplies

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+ DNITY

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need and a well

informed staff including
MEDICAL and DENTAL
students wilt serve you.

Yearly integration Progress in South's
3,009 School Districts
1957
1958-

Legal Steps to Avoid Integration
ABOLISH SCHOOLS s s
GRAN.T OR Hill;j :
PRIVATE DUCATION
.. m ; P

OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
The Medical Book Center
Phone NO 3-44346..... 1216 South University

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DENY FUNDS TO
INTEGRATED SCHOOLS

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t Z3333

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2.:::'

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.sO. ji..
___________________ I i ~.~Jiii~~iN. - & Umm~

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Dance Classes Excisively
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Years of musically

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A COMPREJENSIVE RECORD STOCK -=}-

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RECORD CABINETS AND OTHER ACCESSORIES.
TV SETS by RCA VICTOR

5 PRIVATE HOURS
5 CLASS HOURS ,
5 PARTY HOURS
TOTAL! 15,HOURS
REGISTER NOW!
Deadline Saturday, Sept. 27th
Studio Open 10 A.M.-1 P.M.
All Arthur Murray Students Are

UNIVERSITY OF MIC IGAN jIUSIC

May we invite you to visit us at either of our
two convenient locations.

.sw.

invited to Attend Parties

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