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February 21, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY S'
Swimmers Swamp Spartans,6441
_______ __________________ ATTENTION
a o-

TURDA3

'ear Wins

25 Straight
(Continued from, Page 1)
ley made a determined but frus-
trating attempt to overtake the
hard-pulling Steuart, who stroked
to a new State pool record of
2:03.6. -
The Wolverine's Frank Legacki
shared the evening's high scoring=
honors with Steuart. Legacki, in
the third "big" match of ther
night, turned back the Spartan
national sprint champion, Don
Patterson, in tle 50- and 100-yard
free style,'events.
Legacki Wins Twice
Flitting the water surface, Le-
gacki continued on his undefeated,
path with a 22.5 clocking in the
50 and 49.2 in the 100-yard free
styles.
At the end of the diving contest,1
which marked the meet's half-way,
point, Michigan had doubled thef
score over State, 32-16. The Wol-{
verines took both first and second
on the board as Dick Kimball and
Joe Gerlach performed flawlessly. F
The great reserve strength of the
Wolverines was brought into action'
both i4 the 220-yard butterfly and
back stroke events. Ed Pongracz
and Mike Natelson, filling in for
the usual butterfly duo of Tony.
Tashnick and Dave Gillanders,
took first and second respectively.
Gaxiola First

Wolverine Icers Lose Fifth Straight
To Overpowering Michigan Tech, 5-4

Special to The Daily
HOUGHTON-Michigan's hock-1
ey team met its fifth straight
disaster last night, losing to Mich-
igan Tech, 5-4.
Faint memories lingered of the
last weekend series between these
two teams, when the Wolverines
were set back twice by 3-2 and
10-2 scores.
A returning nemisis, Tech's John
Kosiancic, once again proved to
be the big warrior as he led the
Huskies with two goals. In the pre-
vious series here, Kosiancic col-
lected six goals in two nights, with
five sizzling goals in the second
game.
Cautious Play
The first period opened with both
teams playing cautiously. It wasn't
long, though, until Bob White fired
a perfect pass to Steve Bochen and
the game's first tally slid into the
net.
Michigan, attempting to hold
on to its one-goal margin, played
deliberately and carefully but
couldn't keep its lead. Tech sent
the puck into the nets, and the
period ended with the score knot-
ted 1-1.
All went well until the second
period when the penalty box
started filling up with Wolverines.
It was here where the vulnerable
spot lay and the Huskies took full
advantage of it as they lit the
red light three more times.
Short Handed
Although Michigan's defense
found itself minus a man for a
great amount of the time in the
second period, it held tight as pos-
sible. The first, and second lines
were alternated freely to keep a
pressing defense, but Tech's sec-
ond and fourth goals sneaked
through the shorthanded Wolver-
ines.

Tech's third goal was an oddity
as it hit the crossbar of the net,
bounced back and forth several
times, and finally ended up behind
the goalie.
Michigan's second goal was
scored on a backhand shot from
the blue line by promising sopho-
more Ed Mateka.
That Tech's goals were "cheap"
tended to dishearten the Wolverine
pucksters. That plus the fact that
Coach Al Renfrew's squad had
only two lines to play (instead of

the usual three or four) broke
their backs.
Team Tired
The final period opened with a
much slower pace as both teams
showed some tiredness, but the
Wolverines took a "'never say die"
attitude and ended up outscoring
the home team 2-1.
Bochen received another perfect
bass from White for one goal, and
John Hutton broke through Tech's
defense and tallied the fourth
Michigan goal by himself.
The fight was there, but the
condition of the team was lacking.
This proved to be the downfall of
the Wolverines.
Renfrew said, "When you're
playing two lines against three,
the odds are unfavorable. Ido
think we played a much improved
game, and even though we are
shorthanded the determination.
stood out. That's what counts."
Michigan will meet Tech again
tonight for the final match be-
tween these two teams this year.

.F
CY HOPKINS
... pushes record breaker

BILL STEUART
.. double winner

25th Consecutive Win

COME TOC H CrlkH

, Al Gaxiola finished first in the
200-yard back stroke, while Wol-
verine stalwart John Smith sat on
the sidelines. Joe Price of Michi-
gan finished third.
Tony Tashnick also contributed
a Wolverine first with a 2:08.5
clocking in the 200-yard individual
medley. Tashnick defeated the
much publicized sophomore, David
Diget. jrbanscok, for the first time
in meet competition, proved his
versatility with a third.

400-YD. MEDLEY RELAY - Michi-
gan first with Smith, Clark, Gilland-
ers and McQuire. State second. Time
-3:50.1.
200-YD. FREESTLYE - 1. Steuart
(MSU) 2. Hanley (M) 3. Fries (M).
Time - 2:03.6 (MSU pool record).
50-YD. FREESTYLE -- 1. Legacki
(M) 2. Patterson (MSU) 3, Woolley
(M). Time - 22.5.
200-YD. INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY -
1. Tashnick (M) 2. Diget (MSU) 3.
Rubanscok (M}. Time - 2:08.5.
200-YD. BUTTERFLY - 1. Pon-
gracz (M) 2. Natelson (M) 3. Manweli1
(MSU). Time - 2:16.8.
100-YD. FREESTYLE - 1. Legacki
(M) 2. Patterson (MSU) 3. Woolley
(M). Time 49.2.

200-YD. BACKSTROKE --1. Gaxiola
(M) 2. Coxon (MSU) 3. Price (M).
Time - 2:11.1.
440-YD. FREESTYLE - 1. Steuart
(MSU) 2. Urbanscok (M) 3. Hanley
(M). Time - 4:32.4.
200-YD. BREASTSTROKE - 1. Mo-
dine (MSU) 2. Hopkins (M) 3. Clark
(M). Time - 2:22.4 (new American
record, old record 2:23.3 set by Charles
Griffin, Hill School, 1958).
400-YD. FREESTYLE RELAY -- 1.
Michigan State (with Diget, Jones,
Steuart, Patterson) 2. Michigan.
Time - 3:23.7.
DIVING - 1. Kimball (M) 2. Ger-
lach (M) 3. Kaufmann (MSU). Point
total - 297.45.

04

ON

7HE

*~ABr3 BA'rH

TILLER REMAINS DOUBTFUL STARTER:
Cagers at Northwestern To Avenge Previous Loss

By FRED KATZ
Special to The Daily
EVANSTON - With the hopes
avenging an early-season loss,
[ichigan runs into Northwestern
his evening, an old familiar
umbling block on its 'basketball
urneys.
And the Wolverines' task of
aking amends for an 83-78 loss
> the Wildcats looked more and
ore imposing' with guard Terry

playmaker, banged a knee in prab-
tice .Thursday afternoon and still
was experiencing considerable pain
in yesterday's workout.
Two Alternatives
If Miller is unable to go, Coach
Bill Perigo is left with two prob-
able alternatives, both of which
would involve shifting forward
George Lee to Miller's vacant
guard spot. In Lee's place would
gyn either Rich Donley or Gary

the Wolverines to zoom to second, Boasting what Wolverine Coach,
it could be just as easy for them Bill Perigo calls "the best balanced
to stumble all(the way to seventh, team in the Big Ten," Northwest-
for they now stand only one game ern is also getting the reputation
out of the latter spot. of being the Conference's hard
The Wildcats that Michigan luck squad.
must face tonight are quite pos- In their last two starts the 'Cats
sibly the toughest ninth-place club bowed to Purdue, 65-63, in over-
to be found anywhere, in any time and were nosed out by MSU,
league. 71-68, Monday night.

STEVE BOCHEN
... scores twice
SCOres
NBA
Minneapolis 116, New York 106
Boston 111, Detroit 106 (overtime)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Yale 84, Columbia 66
Duke 71, Virginia 63
Princeton61, Harvard 56
Penn State 71, Colgate 51
Boston College 76, Detroit 62 (ovt.)
Dartmouth 73, Penn 57
Cornell 72, Brown 58
Rensselaer 69, MIT 53
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Michigan State 16, Minnesota 14
Oklahoma State 18, Iowa 9
COLLEGE HOCKEY
North Dakota 6, Minnesota 5
1-
~. 4"a

Miller being placed on the "doubt- Kane, both sophomores.
ful starter" list. If Miller's loss occurs, it will be
Miller, the Wolverines top-notch a serious one for Michigan. The
hustling junior has been averaging
12.7 points in Conference play. But
of even greater importance has
been his work on Wolverines' fast
break.
Gametime at McGaw Hall is 9
p.m. EST. Broadcasts of the tilt
may be heard over WUOM, WHRV
and WCBN, all beginning at 8:55.
In Fourth
A victory would more solidly
entrench the Wolverines in the
Big Ten first division with a 6-4
record. They now rest in fourth, a
v half game out of second.
By winning, Michigan is assured
of gaining ground on at least one
of the teams that precede it in the
standings. Conference leader Mich-
igan State (8-2) takes on second-
place Purdue (6-4) at East Lan-
sing. This, too, is a return engage-,
ment, Purdue having won the first
one on its home court, 85-81.
Indiana, tied for second with
Purdue, takes its sophomore-laden
--: crew to Illinois in what promises
to be a wide-open, free-wheeling
TERRY MILLER affair.
. doubtful starter And although it's possible for

{
MS, PhD or SD Candidate
"0:...

MS, PhD or ScD Candidates
in Engineering-Physics, Applied Mathematics, Chemistry
SPACE TECHNOLOGY
Space Technology Laboratories is responsible for the
technical management of the USAF Ballistic Missile
Program and Space Probes. In addition special scientific
laboratories are now engaged in the exploitation of highly
sophisticated space studies leading to new space vehicles and
communication systems.
To assure continued growth in our capabilities for scientific
advances in these areas we must secure those who have
outstanding potentials to grow in their chosen technical
fields. Opportunities are available for those receiving their
MS or PhD degrees in the near future in the following areas:

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 and 11:30 Meeting for worship.
10:00 Sunday school and college discussion.
11:30 Adult discussion.
7:15 P.M. Young Friends.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Englewood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
,:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service. Lesson Ser-
mon Subject: "Soul."
A free .reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main St. Reading room hours are Mon., 11:00
A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tues.-Fri. 11:00 A.M. to
5:00 P.M. Sat. 9:00 to 5:00 P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks and the Rev. Hugh D.
Pickett, Ministers
Mrs. Gabrielle Bublitz, Assistant Student
Counsellor
Student Bible Class: 10:50 A.M.
9:00-11:00 A.M. Services: "What We Hold in
Common" Preacher: Dr. Chester H. Loucks.
6:45 P.M. Student Meeting in Guild Lounge.
Topic: "Baptist Perspective." Panel Discussion.
Feb. 27-28: State Baptist StudentMovementCon-
ference, East Lansing, on "The Life and Mis-
sion of the Church."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY-
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services
10:00 A.M. Bible Study
6:00 P.M. Supper
7:00 P.M. Program -
WEDNESDAY: 7:15 P.M. Lenten Service.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
God's Mercy.. . In our Hands - Rev. Russell M.
Fuller
The Student Guild will present a film and student
panel on "Alternatives to Military Service"
Memorial Christian Church 7:00 P.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Minister
10:45 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 & 11:00-"Providing For The Inner Man"
10:00-Sunday School-University Class.
5:45-Student Guild
7:00-Evening Service, "The Goodness of God"
Wednesday-7:30 p.m. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Church School
Adult Group-Rabbi Weinberg "Judaism and
the Jewish People"
11:00 A.M. Worship Service
Sermon-"Religion, Ethics and Morality"
7:00 P.M. Student Group-Prof. A. E. Link--
"Hinduism"
Transportation furnished.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Piresbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, Assistant
Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00. Dr. Kuizenga
preaching.'
10:30 A.M. Seminar. "Barriers to Belief."
11 :30 A.M. Student Coffee Hour
3:30 P.M. Mariners - "Is the New Testament
Too Old Fashioned?" Prof. A. K. Stevens: All
married students welcome.
5:30 P.M. Student supper
6:45 P.M. 'Folk Songs and Life Issues." Grey
Austin
TUESDAY--
9:30 P.M. Coffee hour at Pat Pickett's apart-
ment, 217 S. Observatory.
WEDNESDAY
4:15 P.M. Midweek Worship, Douglas Memorial
Chapel, FState and Williams.
7:30 P.M. Midweek Lenten Service.
FRIDAY
6:00 P.M. Graduate Supper
7:00 P.M. "Science & Religion" Prof. Brockway
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Worship Services, with
sermonby the Vicar, "Sinners, Yet Saints.
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Business meeting, with
opportunity for reception of new members.
Tuesday at 6:00: Married Students' Potluck Sup-
per. Phone NOrmandy 3-5560 for reservations
or information.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: 3rd in series of Mid-
week Lenten Vespers.
Thursday at 8:00 P.M.: Meeting of Church Mem-
bership Class. Newcomers cordially invited.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. "Mind"
A free reading room is maintained at 339 So.
Main Street. Reading room hours-are Monday
1 1:00 A.M. to. 8:30 P.M.; Tuesday through
Friday 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Saturday
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E H. Palmer, Minister

A

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Theoretical Physic
Experimental Phy
Applied Mathemat
Space Communica
Radar Systems
Antennas and Mic
Inertial Guidance
Analogue Comput
Aerophysics
Propulsion System
----t-. --s-e-----ae ----s---ses-----------

Cs
tions

Magnetohydrodynamics
Solid State Physics
Digital Computers and
Computer Design
Guidance and Navigation
Telecommunications
Electro-Mechanical Devices
Engineering Mechanics
Applied Aerodynamics
Environment of Man in Space

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For your convenience technical representation
from our laboratories will be available on
February 23
for discussink the opportunities available.'

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND THE
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon for
students, followed by breakfast and discussions
in Canterbury House.
1:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon-
5:00 P.M. Canterbury Buffet Supper
5:30 P.M. Lenten Program

9:30 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
7:00 P.M.1

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Hoover Rupert, L. Burlin Main, Eugene A. Ran-
som, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship: "What Makes
a Church Great?" Dr. Rupert.
7-00 P.M. Wo/rhp nd'r~IProrom_

Unuiversity Bible Class
Morning Worship Service
Evening Worship Service

ri

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11

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