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February 20, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

vement Seeks Practical Experience
r All Foreign Engineering Students

FASCINATED BY OBSCURITY:
Prof. Arrowsmith Tells of Interest
In Criticism, Translation of Classics

-CAMPUS-.
211 S. State
NO 8-9013
--DOWNTOWN--
205 E. Liberty
NO 2-0675

-

By BARTON HUTHWAITE
Foreign engineering students
may soon benefit from a movement
designed to help them gain prac-
tical experience in the United
States.
Security restrictions, immigra-
tion regulations,regional preju-
dices and English language short-
comings are now blocking foreign
students from practical training
jobs.
"Some foreign students consider
this experience even more valuable
than formal education here in the
'United States," assistant to the,
dean of engineering school Prof.
John G. Young said yesterday.
Work Desirable.
Practical work is desirable in
order to apply formal education
in the underdeveloped countries,
he said.
A proposal to study the problem]
is now pending before the execu-
tive board of the Anerican Society
of Engineering Education. If ap-
proved, the ASEE study would
evaluate the worth of practical
experience for foreign students
here and also create an awareness
of the problem, Prof. Young, also
chairman of the ASEE Interna-
tional Relations Committee said.

"Many students have gone home
feeling deprived," he continued.
Instead of reaping international
good will . . . they return to their
native land disappointed," Prof.
Young commented. "This has a
big bearing on our status in critical
countries," he' added.
Allowed To Work
Technical students are allowed
to work in this country for 18
months after graduation according
to present immigration laws, Prof.
Young said.
The ASEE proposed study would
require one year's time at a cost
of approximately $24,000.
The foreign student's principal
handicap is that of being a tem-
porary employee, the study nropo-
sal noted. "Most industrial employ-1
ers consider technical students or
graduates only when there is rea-
sonable expectation of several)
years, or preferably career, em-
ployment," the proposal continued.
Has To Be Wanted
"The foreign student has to be
badly wanted and pretty well ad-
vanced to be accepted for tem-
porary employment by most indus-
trial firms," Prof. Young said. Fac-
ulty members sometimes step in
and assist the student wanting em-

ployment through ttheir contacts
in industry.
"But this is the exception," Prof.
Young said.
Folks inger
Plans Show
Here Today1,1
The walls of the Armory will
echo with nonsense songs, songs of
bad men and of heroes, of court-
ship and of drinking when Oscar
Brand, folksinger and humorist,
steps onto the stage at 8:30 p.m.
today to entertain his audience.
The balladeer carries with him a
repertoire of songs from folk to

By CAROL LEVENTEN
"I was fascinated by the ob-
scurity of it all," Prof. William
Arrowsmith said, explaining his
early interest in classics. "I first
took Greek at prep school, and
was the only one in the only class."
The smiling, distinguished pro-
fessor, now a memberhof the
classics department at the Uni-
versity of Texas, has several pro-
fessions which he can rightfully
call his own. A well-known classi-
cal scholar, he is also a critic
and translator.
Classics is not a degree field for
everyone, he explained, adding
that "the 'caviar curriculum'
should attract the very best stu-
dents in the university.
Visits Ann Arbor
Prof. Arrowsmith, who is in Ann
Arbor this week to give two lec-
tures for the classical studies and
English departments, was here
during the war in a Japanese area
studies program. He attended
Princeton and Oxford, and was a
Guggenheim Fellow, A Woodrow
Wilson Fellow, a Rhodes scholar
and a Prix de Rome Fellow.
A translator of a great number
of Greek and Roman tragedies, he
is at his best when discussing
work in this area.
His work includes the plays of
Aristophanes and Euripides, "Pe-
tronius the Satyricon," which= he
described as "a Roman Lolita, only
much better," and which will be
published by the University Press.

"I try to make a play produce-t
able," he said. "The thing you've
got to create is the illusion of con-
temporaneity. It's impossible to
put Aristophanes in the" exact
modern idiom, and if you stretch
the modernity of the idiom too
far, the illusion necessarily
breaks."
The translation of ancient
drama presents a problem in that
a balance between modern idiom
and classical stylization must be
achieved.
Formerly, translators tried to
create a sense of how tragic dic-
tion must have sounded to Athen-
ian ears, with its austerity, ele-
vation and archaism.
The actor employing these
translations found it difficult to
make his lines live, he added.
Speeches were further compli-
cated by fixed meter and internal
rhyme.
Relates Drama

rently, he is continuing his trans-
lations and reviewing poetry and
novels, in addition to completing for the Finest in Recorded Music
a novel begun in Europe.
COMING NEXT IVEEK!
O
Wednesday thru Saturday, February 25-28
to The Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
' Rossini's Comic Opera *
ri."H BRBROF- SEVILLE"
a Presented by the DEPARTMENT of SPEECH and the SCHOOL of MUSIC
Tickets available for Wednesday and Thursday performances 1.75, 1.50, 1.00
OM
BOX OFFICE OPENS MoN\DAY AT to A.M.p
t> C0<'="3t)C"C>{'."?t0<"""">>t?"?C1<""t>t< rt> <}" ;"<">">C<r" >l<"" >f<} ">"tt} ()

f'

Um

I

)PENS TODAY AT 'U':
AdvoCacy Institute To Talk
On Argument Priesentation

The argument, its presentation
and its relation to proof and pro-
cedurql rules will be the principal
topic of the Institute of Advocacy's
1959 meeting which opens today
in the Rackham Building.
Prof. Charles W. Joiner of the
law school and chairman of the
Institute committee, said the pur-
pose of the Institute was to "help
the profession to better represent
its clients and society." '
Prof. Joiner explained that each
year's meeting, which is sponsored
annually by the law school, ex-
amines different parts of the trial.
News Analyst
To Gi ve Talk
On Reporing
Samuel Lubell, election analyst
and author, will speak on "The
Human Side of Interpretative Re-
porting" at 3 p.m. today in Aud. A,
Angell Hall, as a University Lee-
turer in Journalism.
Lubell, a Columbia University
graduate, began his newspaper
career with the Long Island Daily
Press. He then worked for the
Washington Post, the Richmond
(Va.) Times-Dispatch and the
Washington Times-Herald.
He has also done considerable
magazine' writing. His articles have
appeared in the Saturday Evening
Post, Colliers, and Look.,
Lubell spent the first years of
World War II working for the
Office of Facts and Figures and
then was with the Office of War
Information. He was also an as-
sistant to the Director of Eco-
nomic Stabilization and aided Ber-
nard Baruch on his wartime
studies.
Toward the end of the war, he
was correspondent for the Satur-
day Evening Post in the China-
Burma-India Theatre.

In previous years, rules of evi-
dence, the art of pleading, and
presentation of proof were among
the subjects discussed.
The four lawyers who will be
participants in this year's Institute
include two from Chicago, Albert
E. Jenner, Jr., and Peter Fitz-
patrick, and two from New York,
Harry Gair and Emile Zola Ber-
man. Prof. N.; Edd Miller of the
speech department and Prof.
James V. McConnell of the psy-I
chology department will also par-
ticipate.
The Chief Justice of the State
Supreme Court, John R. Dethmers,
will take part in a discussion and
demonstration of appellate advo-
cacy.
The agenda for today's program,
thhe first of the two-day Institute,
will include the points which make
an argument effective, a demon-,
stration of an argument to the
jury by Jenner and Fitzpatrick,
and a critique of the two lawyers'
argument by Professors Miller and
McConnell.
Prof. Joiner expects 400 mem-
bers of the Bar to attend.
'To Lecture
'On Religionl
John Crowe Ransom, professor
emeritus of English at Kenyon
College will speak on "Religion and
Poetry" at 4:10 p.m. Monday in
Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Sponsored by the English de-
partment and the Committee on
Studies in Religion, Prof. Ransom
is the author of several books and
poetry.
He received degrees from Van-
derbilt University and Oxford Uni-
versity in addition to a Guggen-
heim fellowship for creative writ-
ing and a Nollingen award in
poetry.

I

I

OSCAR BRAND
...to sing ballads
backroom ballads, from love songs
to inane songs.
Brand has received many awards
for both his children's-records and
his record series for adults. His
own composition of "A Guy Is a
Guy" sold more than a million
records.
Brand, a graduate psychologist,
has taken what he has learned
about the human personality and
has woven it into the' pattern of
his folk song presentations.
He has been able to develop a
song-and-story presentation which
has proved successful in such
places as New York's Carnegie Hall
and McMillen Auditorium, as well
as on his weekly television show
from New York.

"xi

"

A

11

The Kingston Trio
Hill Auditorium -- 8:00 P.M.-- Sat., Mar. 14
RESERVE TICKETS with this coupon. Mail to the League
Undergrad office with payment by March 4. Tickets may be
picked up at Hill Aud., March 9 through 13.
NAME Phone
main floor, front 1st balcony tickets at $1.50.
(number)
other tickets at $1.25.
(number)
Total amount of order $ I
L Make all checks payable to the IHC-Assembly Show.

\ \

STARTING
TODAY

Continuous From 1 o'clock
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:05 P.M.
Nights and Sundays 90c
Week Day Matinees 65c

IL-

i

I

f A

TODAY
Through
Saturdayr

I

r ~lv ow w
TWO GREAT ALL TIME SHOWS
IN AN ENCORE TRIUMPH!

DIAL
NO 2-3 136

I "MY FAIR LADY"
OF FILMDOM

I

-N.Y. TIMES
-S
~Idh* '.4
4-
I

They called her"Maggie the Cat"!
PAUL EA I :
in METROCOLOR
AN AVON PRODUCTION

Tonight at 7:00 and 9:00
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
"SUSPICION"
with.
CARY GRANT JOAN FONTAINE
Cartoon
*
Saturday at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday at 8:00
"LA, S-TRADA
with
GUILETTA MASINA
A KIITLJ n IV rf ) 11 ICIII

I

I

ENDING
SATURDAY

i . ;
1 llli a li mml 4i 1 1

DIAL
NO 8-6416

and
strangers!
BOLD IN ITS CASTINGi...OBOLDER IN THE TELLIJNG! HERE ARE
THE MANY FACES OF LOVE --THE TENDER...THE SAVAGE...
THE STRANGE... REVEALED WITH A RARE AND STUNNING FORCE}
H ECHT-H1ILL-LANCASTER present
--M'-DEBORAH
ANDBUTA E
KtwNk ER

"Should win the Academy Award!"
-NEWS
(Maonager's Note: it didn't - it ran second to "River Kwai" -
but it scared the devil out of Guinness)

4,.,

:t

HENRY FONDA

- I

"i - .,f

"

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