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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 21, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T AWARDS ASSEMBLY:
McNitt Says Newspapers Improving

By THOMAS KABAKER
The Awards Assembly of the
journalism department was high-
lighted yesterday by an address
by V. V. McNitt, president of the
McNaught Syndicate.
"Newspapers' are under a han-
dicap in competing with television
similar to that of, the railroads in
competing with the air lines,"

newspapers, but that the tenden-
cy is declining.
McNitt maintained, moreover,
that newspaper writing is more
interesting and better than it was
50 years ago.
Presents Awards
He then presented the Mc-
Naught Awards on behalf of his
syndicate. - The award for excel-
lence in graduate studies in jour-
nalism went to Ronald Wilinow,
Grad.
Margie Goldowits, '59, received
the award for general excellence
in journalism, while Ronald
Kotulak, '59, was presented the
award for reporting. Charles Si-
mon, Jr., '59, received the Mc-
Naught Award for excellence in
editorial writing.
Joseph Zaplitney, '60, was then
presented the Winthrop Burr
Chamberlain Scholarship Award
in journalism.
Presents Byers Award
The Ralph N. Byers Memorial
Merit Award went to Earl Gott-
chalk, '59,~ and William Bradford,
'59, then received the Guy Jenkins
Memorial Award.
James O'Donnel Bennitt schol-
arships went to Janet Smith, '60,
Margerita Korney, '60, Roberta
Dresdner, '60, Wililam Bradford,
'59, Karl Liewert, '60, and Cyn-
thia Simone, '60.
Initiates ofrKappa Tau Alpha
journalism fraternity were also
announced at the assembly. New-
ly selected members of the group
are William Barnes, Grad., Miss
Dresdner, Gottschalk, Grace Lar-
son, Grad., Carol Meyer, '59, Mar-
cia Milanowski, '59, Roy Reynolds,
Grad., LeConte Walker, '60, Kay
Smith, '59, Marylin Smith, '60,
and Judith Webster, '60.
Certificates in journalism for
those with a 2.5 over-all average
and a 3.0 average in journalism

V. V. MCNITT
... addresses assembly

McNitt said.
"Perhaps the newspapers get
such frequent critical treatment
because they 'have been consid-
ered so close and so important to
the lives of the people," he con-
tinued.
States Faults
McNitt said that "shortcomings
in achieving objectivity, accuracy
and liveliness were today's news-
paper's main faults."
He added that news, especially
of politics, is still slanted in some

courses and receiving unanimous
approval of the department's fac-
ulty are: Byron Antman, '59,
Ronald Atkinson, '59, Alicia Cuen,
'59, John DeMott, '59, Miss Goldo-
wits, Gottschalk, and Carol Hart-
man, '59.
Mary Heglar, '59, Marilyn Hunt,
'59, Ronald Kotulak, '59, Gerald
Lundy, '59, Miss Meyer, Miss Mi-
lanowski, '59, Ronald Park, '59,
Marie Pongracz, '59, Jouilette Saf-
fee, '59, Charles Simon, '59, Miss
Kay Smith, and Fredda Sullivan,
'59, were also awarded.
RENEWAL:
City ru
A docates
New Plant
A citizen's committee in favor
of the proposed urban renewal
plan was formally organized
Tuesday night.
A statement issued by Robert S.
McNamara and Russell H. How-
ard, co-chairmen of the commit-
tee, explained that the objective
of the group was to make the
public aware of the benefits of
urban renewal for Ann Arbor.
"The Committee will be con-
cerned with the adequate dissem-
ination of pertinent information
related to the Urban Renewal
Program," the statement said in
part. "We feel that the people of
Ann Arbor ought to have the op-
portunity to judge the plan on its
merits."
Mrs. Kenneth Boulding, execu-
tive secretary of the committee,
said that plans have been made
to circulate petitions in favor of
urban renewal throughout the
city. We hope to get many people
from all parts of the community,
especially those in the area to be
affected by the plan, to join us
in saying that the urban renewal
program is a good program, Mrs.
Boulding said.
Other plans include publication
of a pamphlet explaining urban
renewal, Mrs. Boulding said. Since
we are in favor of urban renewal,
we will be presenting it so that it
will be favorably received, she
continued.
The executive committee of.
"Urban Renewal for Ann Arbor"
is composed of Prof. Arthur Bro-
mage of the political science de-
partment, Earl Cress, Peter Dar-
row, Mrs. Russell T. Dobson, Jr
Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld of the
political science department, Mrs.
Paul Hough, Prof. Charles Joiner
of the law school, Ralph Kraker,'
and Dr. Albert Wheeler.

Commission
Asks Funds
From City
At its meeting Tuesday the Ann
Arbor Human Relations Commis-
sion decided to ask the City Coun-
cii to consider restoring the $1,000
slash in its next year's budget.
Rev. Henry Lewis, former Com-
mission chairman, blamed Ann
Arbor's Mayor Cecil O. Creal in
prohibiting him to speak at the
May 11 Council meeting during
which the budget -was adopted.
Mayor Creal, in answer, claimed
that Rev. Lewis would have had
an opportunity to speak if he had
stayed long enough at the meet-
ing.
To Effect Staff Member
The $1,000 cut by the City Coun-
cil will affect the Commission's
ability to afford one person as a
staff member on a half-time basis.
In making the cut, however, the
Council added that the $1,000
would be returned if the Com-
mission can show it needs it in
six months.;
A letter asking for restoration,
of the money and describing the
Commission's need for staff help;
will be sent the Council. Rev. Lewis
said the letter should be signed by
every member of the Commission,
because he was afraid other things
"will be done to put that letter
aside." He also explained he had
waited an hour at the Council
meeting for the budget to come up.
Doesn't Blame Members
Although he did not blame
Council members, Rev. Lewis call-
ed the fact that he was not heard
"very bad government." He said
that several Council members had
offered to take further steps, but
he had asked them not to do soI
in order to keep the issue from be-
coming personal.
Explaining that he is bound by
Council rules on meeting proce-
dure, Mayor Creal said there is at
place at the end of the agenda fore
citizens to speak. He said thatI
such things must be considered inX
order to facilitate orderly meet-c
ings.
Group To Hold'
First Meeting
The Latin American Studentu
Organization will hold its firstI
meeting at 7 p.m. today in the In-
ternational Center, Horacio Ml'ar-F
ull, organizational manager, said
yesterday.
Plans for the meeting includef
approval of a new constitution
and the election of officers. All
Latin American and American$
students are invited to attend.
Objectives of the newly-formed1
association are to promote good
will between Latin American and
American students and between
Latin American countries and the
United States.
The group also hopes to estab-
lish contact between its members
that will continue after their re-
turn to their native countries.

weu er *roug nmay, the igest
contains condensations of articles
from various professional jour-
nals and general publications of
that month, written by people in
educational fields.
With its circulation of 16,000
including numerous school super-
intendents, principals, and li-
braries throughout the United
States and elsewhere, the Digest
tries to solve the "numerous peri-
odical problem."
Explains Problem
Explaining this problem, Prak-
ken said that there are over 500
periodicals written in the field of
education, and the average school
administrator "could not possibly
go through all these periodicals
each month."I
The Digest assumes the task of
looking over all the periodicals,
screening them, picking out tlAe
more significant articles of the
month and then condensing them
for publication.
The job is begun by one mem-
ber of the staff who goes through
and picks out most of the more

Prakken explained that it was
in the '30's when he first "saw the
place for a magazine such as
this."..
Dismayed by the vast array of
isolated periodicals, he attempted
to make a survey of the possibili-
ty for acceptance of a magazine
such as the Education Digest.
His first survey, taken through
the mail of about 200 people, in-
dicated that 40 per cent of the
people contacted either liked the
idea or would subscribe to the
magazine if it was published.
Made Surveys
Prakken made two further sur-
veys, the first one contacting a
few thousand people, the second
cnacting 20,000 people.
"The mail surveys were expen-
sive, but rewarding," he said, be-
cause the positive response re-
ceived showed him that he could
go ahead with his idea for the
magazine.
"Before I even had a dummy
or a layout, I had promises for
4,000 subscriptions," Prakken as-
serted.
The publisher went on to re-
late that for a while after it was
begun, his Education Digest had
been published in Portuguese in
Brazil, in Japanese and' in Span-
ish in Lima, Peru.
Publications Not Lasting
"These publications did not last
very long, however; either becau:,
there was no interest or because
their circulation and promotion
was ineffective, he explained.
Nevertheless, -copies of the Di-
gest are' still distributed to indi-
vidual libraries and educators in
some of these countries, Prakken
added.

Education Digest Provides
Condensations of Aritieles
By ANITA FELDMAN
significant articles, ones which
The Education Digest is a mag- seem to him to have the greatest
azine "published as a social sere- seditorial balance."
ice for the purpose of upgrading Screen Articles
education," Lawrence Prakken, These articles are then screened
editor and publisher of the maga- further by two or three other
tine, explained, staff members before their con-
Published monthly from Sep- densation is begun.
ftmhb thrna h M7th.Ti-nf .

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Government
Fellowships
ToBGiven
Students interested in becoming
teachers 'of Arabic, Chinese, Hin-
dustani, Japanese, Portuguese, or
Russian should immediately ap-
ply for fellowships at any college
or university offering a graduate,
program in one of these langauges,
United States Commissioner of
Education Lawrence Derthick an-
nounced recently.
Recommendations for fellow-
ship awards to be considered for
the school year 1959-60 must be
sent to the national Office of Ed-
ucation by June 22, Commissioner
Derthick said.
The first fellowships under the
ForeigndLanguage Program
authorized by the National De-
fense Education Act will be
awarded before July 1.
Grants range from $1,500 to
$3,500. Travel allowances and al-
lowances for dependents are also
included.
ii
Creal Claims
Funds Date
Not Feasible
Ann Arbor Mayor Cecil O. Creal
said a June 15 date for the city
to file materials to obtain federal
urban renewal funds "as unreal-
stic as it can be."
He indicated he favors a move
;o ask the federal government for
more time. The City Council asked
or an extension of a June 1 dead-
ine earlier. Federal authorities
et a June 15 deadline for the city
to take steps to gather and file
pertinent material.
. The steps include formal adop-
ion of the urban renewal plan by
he Council,.-provision for local
unds and the underwriting of a
ent subsidy for displaced low-in-
ome groups.
A public hearing on the Urban
Renewal Plan has been set for 7:30
.m. June 10. Creal said he does
mot avor any city commitments
.ntil an election has been held.

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To Give Tall
On Indian Art
Mr. Arnand Krishna of Ba-
nares, India will speak on "Medie-
val Indian Painting" at 4:15 p.m.
today in 203 Tappan Hall.
His lecture is jointly sponsored
by the Department of Fine Arts,
the Museum of Art, the Depart-
ment of Near -Eastern Studies,
and the Department of Far East-
ern Studies.

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