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May 17, 1959 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-17

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;TEN

TIME MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. MAY 17. 1959

TEN THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. MAY 17. 1959

the, game's t thing!.
Fred Katz, Associate Sports Editor

IN CONFERENCE MEET TUNEUP:
M' Golfers Defeat U-D,

Wisconsin, Lose to MSU

The Def ense Speaks
One more epilogue to the modern, sporting version of Little Red
Riding Hood and the big, bad wolf was entered Thursday. The big,
bad wolf strode through the woods, crossed the Red Cedar River and
did its dirty work on the Michigan State campus.
It locked grandmothers John Kobs, Biggie Munn and Duffy
Daugherty in the closed and snatched Al Luplow, a sweet young thing,
for its own ("the better to devour you in the insidious world of pro-
fessional baseball, my dear").
At least that's how college baseball likes to picture itself - a
helpless young maiden with no protection from el lupo alias the pros.
The signing of Luplow, the Spartans' sophomore star, gives the col-
leges further opportunity to exclaim how big and bad the pros are.
It's funny, though, how Senor Wolf always remains so silent.
The American public is famous for its love of the underdog and so
the colleges have played the role to the hilt. Thus, it's no wonder that
the pros are pictured as villains.
' There's no attempt here to deny-the often-apparent viciousness
of the major leagues in signing college players. Nor can their actions
be thoroughly condoned. But it's important to hear their side of the
story, be it right, wrong or simply a matter of opinion.
No one is more qualified as a spokesman for the majors than
Joe L. Brown, Pittsburgh Pirates general manager, a member of the
Professional Baseball College Committee and voted baseball's top
executive of 1958.
"I am sympathetic with those college coaches who have had
youngsters sign with professional clubs for little or no bonus," Brown
said in a recent letter to this writer. "But I cannot understand or
sympathize with their complaints over losing a boy with outstanding
ability who has signed for a substantial amount of money.
"Baseball is a highly respected profession and it seems only logi-
cal to me that a college coach who is interested sincerely in the fu-
ture of his players should be pleased that one or more of his boys
has been enabled to start in his chosen work under such favorable
and profitable conditions."
Brown believes there is some justification for protests by college
coaches on the so-called major league raids, and honestly feels the
situation isn't as serious as some coache make it appear.
"The Pittsburgh organization, for example, has never attempted
to induce a collegian to enter professional baseball unless the young
man indicated his desire to do so," he says.
"We do, of course, follow closely those prospects in whom we
are 'interested, but only to the extent that we will be able to com-
pete for their services in the event that they decide later to enter
professional baseball."
Education Can Continue-.-.
Brown emphasizes that because a player leaves college to enter
baseball doesn't necessarily mean his education must cease.
"Pitcher Bob Friend signed with the Pirates in 1950 while in his
first semester at Purdue," says Brown. "Bob received his degree from
Purdue in 1957, became eligible for one of the finest pension plans
in the business world, as well as earning a fine salary in baseball
and operating his own investment firm in Pittsburgh.
"This is an unusual case, to be sure, but there are a minimum
of 42 players in the Pirates' organization who are continuing their
college education during the winter months.
Brown calls college football one of professional baseball's biggest
competitors, because it is difficult, or sometimes impossible, to equal
the financial rewards which are offered to two-sport athletes by a
large number of universities.
"Many youngsters who have been considered outstanding major
league baseball prospects in high school lose their ability in college,"
Brown says, "either as a direct result of participation in football or
because they were not permitted to play baseball during their college
years."
Brown isn't blind to the problem facing the colleges.
"Baseball must either be more mindful of the individual college
man's problems, and as a result, sign only those players who are con-
sidered to be definite prospects. Or perhaps some type of rule could
be passed which would furnish such protection.
"If the college coaches could all come to the realization that
professional baseball is a profession which offers many benefits to
.young men just as do medicine, law, engineering, etc., then they
should have no real objection to the entrance of any of their players
in the professional sport under favorable conditions."
This, in brief, is one professional's point of view. The collegiate
sympathizer undoubtedly can knock a multitude of holes in it just
as his argument can be done likewise. But is this really a big, bad
wolf speaking?

By DAVE ANDREWS
The Michigan golf team played,
sharp golf on the final 18 holes
yesterday and defeated Wisconsin
241-111, and Detroit 301/2-5/2,
but it could not overcome an early
Michigan State lead and fell to
the Spartans 191!-161/.
Trailing MSU 12-6 at noon the
Wolverines, led by Chuck Black-
ett and Dick Youngberg fought
back and nearly caught the Spar-
tans.
The final three point margin is
much closer than it looks as "M"
split the matches won and lost
with State. The difference came
in Joe Brisson's 6-0 loss to MSU's
Tyler Caplan.
Encouraging Round
Coach Bert Katzenmeyer said,
"I was disappointed by the morn-
ing scores, but very encouraged by
the afternoon rounds." His golfers
played badly in the morning as
only two of the six- men playing
broke 80.
However, there was a different
story in the afternoon. Besides
the 73's turned in by Blackett and
Youngberg, Larry Markman and
Pat Keefe fired 77's and Captain
Ray Lovell had a 79. Only Joe
Brisson played worse in the after-
noon. He fell from a 78 to an 81.
The final scores illustrate the
kind of golf played by the Wol-
verines in the afternoon. They
won 43 out of a possible 54 points

from their three opponents. This
included an 18-0 shutout over De-o
troit, a team they had barely de-
feated earlier in the year.
Katzenmeyer said, "The sub-,
par nines of 34 and 35 turned in
by Youngberg and Blackett were
great displays of golf." Youngberg
started his round with three pars,"
but then he fired threehconsecu-
tive birdies to go three under par. +
U.S. Retains
Walker Cup
MUIRFIELD, Scotland (R) - A
trio of college boys new to inter-
national competition - Ward
Wettlaufer, Jack Nicklaus and
Deane Beman-paced U.S. ama-
teur golfers to a sweeping 9-3
Walker Cup victory over the Brit-
ish yesterday.
Wettlaufer, 23, and Nicklaus, 19,
player superb sub-par golf for
crushing one-sided victories and
Beman, idle in Friday's team
matches, came from behind to
win a decision, on the final green.
Two veterans of Walker Cup
play, Harvie Ward and Bill Hynd-
man III, contributed two other
points in America's 16th cup tri-
umph, with only one defeat, in 37
years.

He continued with two more pars,
and finished with a bogey on the
18th.
Yesterday's quadrangular meet
was the final dual competition of
the year for the "M" team. They
finished the regular season with
a respectable 8-5 record. Only two
of the losses have been inflicted on
the home course as three of them
came on the unfamiliar Ohio
State course.
Looking ahead to the Confer-
ence meet which will be held here,
next weekend Katzenmeyer smiled
when he said, "I - still feel that
Indiana and Purdue are the teams
to beat, but State is stronger than
I anticipated.
'We Can Win'
"However." he said, "if we have
two good days I think we' can
win."His team has improved tre-
mendously recently and must be
considered a contender.
Despite the fact that they have
lost to both Michigan State and
Indiana here in match play they
have yet to be beaten by anyone
on the University course by total
strokes. Yesterday in the loss to
MSU they still managed to out-
s c o r e t h-e Spartans by eight
strokes, 946-954. Indiana was also
beaten on total score this week
and Purdueearlier this year.
1V4dal play scoring is used to
decide the Big Ten Championship.
The teams are allowed to play six

men and the top five individual
totals are i1sed to provide the
team total.
Golf Summaries
POINTS WON FROM
MICHIGAN MSU U-II WIS.
Lovell, 79-79--158 3 4' 311
Brisson, 78-81-159 0 5! 314
Blackett, 80-73-153 4 6 51_
Keefe, 81-77--159 41j 4 6
Youngberg, 85-73--158 3 6 3
Markman, 83-77-160 1!72 4 3
MICHIGAN STATE
Smith, 78-80--158; Caplan 16-76-
152; Reynolds, 84-77-161; Schmidt,
86-79-165; Barrett, 82-84-166; Bald-
win, 75-77-152.
WISCONSIN
Steeno, 84-77-161; Walden, 80-
78-158; Remmert, $4-77--161; Klein,
83-82-165; Quam, 79-83--162; Park-
er, 79-84--163.
Adams, 7988---167; Molenda, 79-
88-167; Predliomme, 90-92-182;
Skover, 80-88-168; Sarowski, 98-88--
186; Sample, t 83-81--170.
HILLEL
SUPPER CLUBS
Today 6:00 P.MX
1429 Holl

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-Daily-Allan Winder
ALL SET-Michigan golf captain Ray Lovell prepares to hit his
short chip shot on the 18th hole of the morning round in yester-
day's meet with Michigan State, Detroit and Wisconsin. The
Wolverines beat the Badgers and Titans, but lost to the Spartans.

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