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May 13, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-13

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1X THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wolverines

Fall

I

,ocal Batters Limited to Seven Hits,
lurler Marcereau Drives in Lone Run

Lo

Powerful

Western,

Squad,

by Jim Benagh, Sports Editor

7-1

By BILL ZOLLA
"The baseballs seemed to have
eyes," shouted Western Michigan's
diamond coach, Chuck Maher to
his adversary, Michigan's Don
Lund as the two men followed
their teams off the field after
Western's 7-1 victory here yester-
day.
He was referring to the many
hard-hits but right at 'em drives
that the Wolverines smashed into
the gloves of the Western players
at key moments in the game.
A trio of Bronco pitchers gave
up seven hits and three walks
while the . team committed four
errors.
Lone Run
In that frame, catcher Dick
Syring reached second base on a
throwing error by third baseman
Joe Gresser. Starting Michigan
pitcher, Bob Marcereau then
placed a two-out single over sec-
ond base that tallied the runner.
Two more infield errors followed
to load the bases, but the Michi-
gan team reached the height of
its frustration as first baseman
George Fead hit a hot grounder
to the third baseman who stepped
on the bag to retire the side. The
Wolverines stranded 11 runners,
eight in the first four innings.
The big guns in Western's at-
tack were first baseman Andy
Barich, catcher Larry Belanger
and second baseman Tom Wood.

Barich scored one run and drove
in two more in the Broncos' big
three-run first inning that put
the game beyond the reach of the
Wolverines. Bellinger knocked in
three runs on a sacrifice fly and
a tremendous home run to left
field. Wood collected three singles
scoring one tally and batting in
another.
First Inning Runs
The left handed Marcereau had
only himself to blame for his first
inning predicament, however. He
walked the leadoff man, center-
fielder Roger Flath, and then pro-
ceded to hit the next batter, right
fielder Larry Randall.
Shortstop Frank Quilici sacri-
ficed the runners along and set
the stage for Barich's two-run
hit, Gresser followed with a walk,
and Wood subsequently drove in
Barich with a single.
Marcereau struck out the dan-
gerous Belanger to halt the dam-
age at this point.
Score Again
Western added another score in
the third inning as Gresser led
off with a double. He advanced to
third as Fead committed an error
at first. Belanger then sacrificed
him home with a deep fly to left
field.
Marcereau seemed to find him-
self in ,the next two frames as he
retired six men in order, but he
was hit hard in the sixth. Wood
singled, and then sBelanger fol-
lowed with his long blast that
cleared the fence in left center
field and landed a good fifty feet
beyond.
The visitors collected their last
tally in the ninth off relief hurler
Al Koch. They bunched a walk to

Randall, single by Quilici, and an
error by shortstop Barry Marshall,
who had replaced Terry Ziegler, to
score the run.
Lineup' Juggled
The Wolverines' lineup was
juggled by Lund to make as much
use of his available players as pos-
sible. Three regulars were unable
to compete in the contest; they
were first baseman Bill Roman,
who was nursing an injured leg,
sustained in a collision with Wis-
consin's Dale Hackbart on Satur-
day, shortstop Gene Struczewski
and center fielder Jack Mogk, both
of whom had important exams.
All of Lund's crew will be fit
and ready today though as the
team travels to Detroit to play
University of Detroit.
Western Omlette
WESTERN MICH. AB R H E RBI
Flath,cf 4 10 0 0
Randall, rf 2 2 0 0 0
Quilici, ss 4 0 2 2 0
Buchanan, if 5 0 0 0 0
Barich, lb 5 1 1 0 2
Gresser, 3b 3 1 1 1 0
Wood, 2b 4 1 3 1 1
Belanger, c 3 1 1 0 3
Bareis, p 2 0 0 0 0
Ortlieb, p 1 00 0 0
Topp, p 1 0 0 0 0
TOTALS 34 7 8 4 6
MICHIGAN AB R H E RBI '
Ziegler, ss 4 00 0 0
Koch, p 10 00 0
Franklin, if 4 0 1 0 0
Fead, lb 5 .0 1 10
Brown,3b 2 00 0 0
Dickey, rf 4 0 0 0 0
Halstead, cf 3 0 1 0 0
Syring, c 4 11 0 0
Kucher, 2b 4 0 2 0 0
Marcereau, p 3 0 1 0 1
a-Marshall, ss 1 0 0 1 0
TOTALS 35 1 7 2 '1
a-Grounded out for Marcereau in
6th
2B--Gresser; MR-Belanger; DP
-Gresser, Wood, and Garich; HPB
-Randall (Marcereau), Halstead
(Barels), Franklin (Tope).
Western Mich. 301 002 001-7 8 4
MICHIGAN 010 000 000-1 7 2
PITCHING SUMMARY
IP H BB SO R ER
Bareis (W) 3 2 1 2 1 0
Ortlieb 3 4 1 2 0 0
Topp 3 1 1 1 0 0
Marcereau (L) 6 6 3 1 6 5
Koch 3 2 1 2 1 0

-Daily-Allan Winder
TOO LATE-Wolverine John Halstead is out in a close play at first base attempting to beat out a
ground ball in the second inning of yesterday's baseball game. Bronco first baseman Andy Barich
stretches to take the throw while first base coach Jim Bradshaw watches attentively.
Tennis Team Def eats Michigan State,
To Secure Fourth Consecutive Victory

Special to The Daily
EAST LANSING - Michigan's
heralded tennis team, once again
chalked up another victory, this
time against Michigan State 7-2,
yesterday.
The Wolverines made this their
fourth consecutive win which gives
them an overall season record of
eight wins and one loss. The only
setback this year came at the
hands of the powerful Notre Dame
club by a close 5-4 count.
By defeating the Spartans yes-
terday the 'M' netmen are cur-
rently at the top of the Big Ten
heap. This win also enabled the
team to stay in top shape for the
Illinois meet this Friday.
Erickson Wins
Numier one man, Jon Erickson,
started out Michigan's winning
winning ways by defeating MSU's

Bill Hotchkiss, 6-3, 6-2. Erickson,
who has been plagued by an in-
jured back since his high school
days, did not receive any reoc-
currences of this old nemesis.
In number two singles, Gerry
Dubie added another victory to
his credit by downing Dave Smith,
6-3. 6-2. Dubie, although only a
sophomore, has been living up to
all expected predictions and prob-
ably will be depended on heavily
next year.
In doubles, Erickson and Dubie
formed the number one Michigan
representation again. They went.
on to chalk up a very closely played
-7-5, 6-4 win.
In addition, in number two
doubles, Zaitzeff and Peacock re-
versed a first set 0-6 loss and ended
up winning 0-6, 6-0, ยข-0. The final
doubles match was a 6-4, 6-3 vic-

tory for MSU's Plagenhoff and
Mescall over Sassone and Gordon.
Yesterday also marked the first
time that the Wolverine tennis
team played on the Spartan's
newly built asphalt tennis courts.
The only 'M' singles loss was
given to sophomore Mike Gordon,
4-6, 3-6.
MICHIGAN 7, Michigan State 2
Singles
Erickson (M) def. Hotchkiss
(MSU) 6-3, 6-2; Dubie (M) def.
Smith (MSU) 6-3, 6-2; Sassone (M)
def. Hoffman (MSU), 6-4, 6-4; Zait-
zeff (M1) def. Plagenhoef (MSU)
6-0, 6-4; Peacock (M) def. Sassock
(MSU) 6-4, 7-5; and Mescall (MSU)
def. Gordon (M) 6-4, 6-3.
Doubles
Erickson andDubie (M) def.
Hotchkiss and Smith (MSU) 7-5,
6-4; Zaitzeff and Peacock (M) def.
Hoffman and Sassock (MSU) 0-6,
6-0, 6-0; and Plagenhoef and Mes-
call-(MSU) def. Sassone and Gor-
don (M) 6-4, 6-3.

Bowl Vote
IF SGC BECKONS you to its polls today to vote on "the crucial"
Rose Bowl question, there are a lot of sides of this story to consider.
Everybody wants to get in this act and tell 44 football players
what they are supposed to do on New Year's Day - and then on an
average of only once every decade. The game, and the player's bowl
future, has become a game between faculty, alumni, athletic admin-
istrators and students.
Pros .. .
But let's look at the game from the players' viewpoint, since they
should be considered first. Attending a bowl game is not as detract-
ing to the players as people think. Only four of the 16 practice ses-
sions are scheduled on class days. The others are held on Saturdays
and during the actual vacation. Several Rose Bowl veterans, includ-
ing Michigan Coach Bump Elliott, have declared that their parti-
cipation in the game and its preparations did not hamper their
school work.
There is no question that the game is a rich experience for the
players as well as the students. There is a rule against a school going
two years in a row, thus eliminating any chance to spoil the, honor
with repetition as the case has been with Oklahoma. (Ohio State'
Woody Hayes pointed out the other day that, "If 'you got to go every
year, I'd vote against the Bowl.")
Most of the negative feelings toward the game are not the players'
fault - although they will be the ones to suffer if the pact is voted
out. The commercialization of the affair is its biggest wealness. But
if this were used as a reason to rule out the game, it would be utter
rationalization. No one has to
spend money on all the high-price
lures at Pasadena.
The other major weakness .is
the attitudes of students and .
alumni at schools which fail to
make the trip. If one wants an ex-
cellent example, he may re-
examine the reaction of the fans
four years ago when Michigan
lost to Ohio State in the bowl
bid showdown. At 1:30 p.m. that
Saturday afternoon, Michigan was
on the verge of a championship.
Three hours later the team was
booed by many of their support-
ers, who engaged in a free-for-all
in the stands that brought con- -" 1.
siderable shame to the University.
.. .and Cons
Are there any positive reasons!. . in the act
why the Big Ten should pull out
of the Bowl pact? One is that the Western Conference is lowering in
prestige if it establishes a contract with the newly-formed Coast
league which will include at least four California schools and Wash-
ington. The new group can't even match the strength of the old
Pacific Coast Conference which the Big Ten smashed in 12 of 13
outings.
Unfortunately, several Big Ten schools will push for a renewal
of the Bowl pact - probably for financial reasons. The list includes
Michigan, whose, athletic department suffered tremendously from
lack of finances this year.
The schools that do want a bowl pact have only the Rose Bowl
to choose, too, because of segregation rules (on field and/or stands)
in the nation's four other major bowl contests. Maybe the Confer-
ence ought to drop the pact - but because of the prestige factor,
not the players.

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THEDE, SHERER HANDLE CRAFTS:
Wolverine Sailing Club Captures Detroit Regatta

11

Casualclothes &
m oElmES
Partnership, Unlimited

By BUZ STEINBERG
In water, Michigan swimmers
have earned quite a name, but the
sailing team, which also competes
in water, has not received as much
recognition although itshas been
just as successful in its field of
endeavor.
COEDS
Our flattering, casual,
easy-to-do hairstyles
for summer will enhance
YOU!
No appointments needed j
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

It was only this past weekend
that the sailing club added another
trophy to its present multitudes by
taking the Detroit Yacht Club
Regatta. A total of twelve schools
entered the two-day meet.
Originally twelve events were
scheduled, but Poor weather
threatened, and nine of the events
were completed on the first day,
Saturday. The second day weather
conditions caused the cancellation
of the final three events.
The Wolverine skippers, led by
Dexter Thede and Otto Scherer,
managed to squeeze out a close
81-80 victory over Detroit. The
Titans were followed by Notre
Dame and Wisconsin.
The course was set up between
Belle Isle and the Detroit city
limit.
The 18-ft. interlake sloops which
the "M" sailing club uses has 150

square feet of said and is stabilized Michigan, Detroit, Michigan State,
by a wood and lead centerboard. Wayne and Oberlin will compete
The sailing club's next competi- in the eliminations, from which
tion is the Michigan Eliminations, three schools will emerge for the
sponsored by the University of finals.1
Detroit. Five teams, including The meet will be held Saturday.
SPORT SHORTS:
Lee Turns .Down Pros

For Men

George Lee, University of Michi-
gan basketball star has turned
down offers to play professional
basketball for the Detroit Pistons
next year, it was announced today.
Instead, Lee has decided to play
in the National Independence
League for a team sponsored by a
Denver trucking company. The
burley playmaker, 6'4" and 215
pounds, scored a total of 1,110
points while playing in 66 games
at the University of Michigan.
* * *
Robinson To Fight Basilio
PHILADELPHIA (P)-Sugar Ray
Robinson signed yesterday to fight
Carmen Basilio Sept. 21 in Phila-

delphia and received virtual assur-
ance that the National' Boxing
Association would return his mid-
'dleweight title taken by edict May
4.
The 39-year-old Robinson also
fulfilled a New York Athletic Com-
mission ultimatum to sign for a
Basilio fight by Friday or lose -his
title by an edict in that state.
The announcement, made at a
press conference, immediately
caused speculation in boxing cir-
cles. Some officials intimated it
was a phony deal on Robinson's
part to stall for time in efforts to
regain his title.

AMEajor League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

I

NEAT &FRESH
IN COTTON MESH

4

I

Lots of

Cleveland
Chicago
Baltimore
Washington
Boston
Kansas City
New York
Detroit

W
16
15
15:
15:
12:
11
Ii
9'

L' Pct.1
9 .640
11 .57'7
12 .5561
14 .517
13 .480
14 .440
14 .440
17 .346

GB
11/
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3
4
5
5
73

REMO

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YESTERDAY'S.RESULTS
Washington 7, Detroit 4
Chicago 4, Boston 3
Cleveland 7, New York 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Baltimore (N)
Detroit at Washington (N)
Cleveland at New York
Chicago at Boston
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Los Angeles
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
San Francisco
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
St. Louis

W L
18 12
15 10
14 12
14 13
15 15
12 14
11 15
10 18

Pct.
.600
.600
.538
.519
.500
.462
.423
.357'

GB
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to your tennis game.!

Pair

Sizes

Black
and
Brown

61 to 12
4to E

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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 3, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 6, San Francisco 5
Chicago 7, Milwaukee 3
St. Louis 7, Cincinnati 4
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at San Francisco
Milwaukee at St. Louis (N)
Cincinnati at Chicago
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles (N)

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