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April 30, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Olympic Leader
Tokyo Favorite

Wolverine Baseball Team
Faces Notre Dame Today

She means so much to you!
Tell her so on her special day
SUNDAY, MAY 10
with

don't want to pay the heavy ex-
penses to send their teams to
Japan. European nations are still
recovering from losses spent on
their trips to Melbourne in 1956.
Detroit's delegation, which lists
Roby as one of its leaders, will of-
fer to help subsidize the visiting
teams' food and housing bills, if
Detroit is selected.
Detroit To Subsidize
"I think Detroit will ask for
only seven dollars per person,"
speculated Roby. "The actual cost
would run about 12-15 dollars."
Roby said Detroit's biggest
drawback is -recent reports that
many South Amreican representa-
tives will ngt attend the Munich
meeting.
"I think we woul1 have had
most of their votes," he continued.
Americans May Oppose
Actually, Detroit may not even
get the other two American votes.
Garland, a native of Los An-
geles, has expressed himself be-
ing against Detroit because he
wants his city to get the 1968
Games. Brundage, who is also the
IOC president, is known to vote
impartially on such matters.
"Detroit can be sure of my
vote," declared Roby. "I've been
trying to get the Games there for
'20 years."
His first attempt was in 1939
when he went to London to bid for
the 1944 Games. However, the war
interrupted all plans.
Knows Detroit's Opposition
Roby admits he knows what De-
troit is up against in its hopes for
1964; he toured Tokyo last May
with 31 other IOC members.,
"Tokyo did a terrific job of sell-
ing," he said, "from =the Emperor
on down the ranks.
"They have wonderful facilities,
many of them built for last year's.
Asian Games. They have a sta-
dium that will be increased to
seat 110,000."
Detroit is backed by a Congres- I
sional resolution, Pres. Dwight D.
Eisenhower, Gov. G. Mennen Wil-
liams, and the city government.

HOLDS THEM CLOSE-Bill Roman, Michigan first baseman and
one of the team's leading sluggers, holds an Eastern Michigan
baserunner close to the bag.
140 GAMES LEFT:
ExyTMIgr LundOffers
Hopes for Detroiters
BY TOM WITECKI I

By DAVE ANDREWS
Coach Don Lund's Wolverine
baseball team will open its four-
game weekend road trip this after-
noon when it engages Notre Dame
at South Bend.
Lund has named sophomore
lefthander Joe Brefeld to do the
pitching today. He plans to save
frontliners Al Koch, Nick Liakonis
and Bob Marcereau for the Friday
game with Indiana and the Sat-
urday double bill at Ohio State.
Brefeld will be makin his first
start since being hit hard on the
southern trip during spring vaca-
tion.
He will be facing a strong Notre
Dame team. The Irish have a fine
spring record and already hold
two wins over Indiana, Michi-
gan's next opponent.
Split Last Year
Last year the two teams split in
two games, the Wolverines winning
here and the Irish at South Bend.
Both of last year's games were
slugfests.
In the game here Wolverine hit-
ters pounded out 11 hits and got
numerous walks in a 13-7 triumph.
At South Bend the Irish reversed'
the story as they slaughtered six
"M" pitchers in their 18-11 win:
Hitters' Duel
Today contest figures to be an-
other hitters' battle. Lund's forces
have found hits in their bats of
late while Notre Dame is also

noted for its powerful hitting. In
games played this spring they have
piled up winning scores of 14-1,
11-7, 9-2, and 12-5.
Lund's squad, although not over-
powering with the bat, did get
33 hits. in last weekend's three-
game series with Michigan State.
While today's game is not as
important as a Conference game,
it should give the "M" nine the
tuneup they need for the heavy
Big Ten slate this weekend.
NCAA Hits'.
Cincinnati,
NEW ORLEANS (R) - Work-
and-learn education and money
help to athletes combined yester-
day to dip the University of Cin-
cinnati into hot water with the
National Collegiate Athletic As-
sociation.
The powerful 18-man NCAA
advisory council also slapped a
one-year probation on Gustavus
Adolphiis of St. Peter, Minn., for
playing in a non-certified post-
season football game last year.
Walt Byers, Executive Director
of- the NCAA, explained the Cin-
cinnati probation will not keep its
athletic teams out'of post-season
events or NCAA championships.

**

i
1'
1

NIL,

MOTHER'S DAY
CARDS
"When you care enough
to send the veer best"
BOCE'
PHOTO
723 N. University
NO 3-4514

"It's just the way the ball
bounces" is the cliche Don Lund
used to describe the plight of his
former teammates, the Detroit
Tigers.
Now in his first year as Michi-
gan's head baseball coach, Lund
had words of sympathy for the
cellar-dwelling Bengals, who have
won just two of their first 14
games.
Over a 12-year period, Lund had
been an outfielder, scout and coach
in the Detroit organization before
returning to his alma mater last
winter.
"Things just haven't jelled for
Bill Norman, but with all the
potential of the club, I am sure
it will start winning plenty of ball
games soon," said Lund,
However, Detroiters are not as
patient as Lund and haven't been
anywhere near as sympathetic.
Disgusted with the miserable
showing of the home team, fans
and sportswriters alike, have been
tagging the Tigers since opening
day.

No one in the Detroit organiza-
tion has escaped the wrath of an-
gry Detroiters, who haven't seen
a real pennant contender since
1950 despite the yearly promises
and changes made by the club.
Supporting the Bengals Lund
said, "None of the recent hot-
headed changes suggested would
help the club. It is just having a
bad slump, something that hap-
pens to every ball club during a
season."
"I am sure the front office is
doing all it can and that the
players are giving- their all. After
all, no one likes to lose. In fact
with all the tension building up
about the losing streak,. the play-
ers are probably trying twice as
hard, and it is having a reverse
effect."
"The Tigers have a good team,
good enough to win over half of
their games-they showed that in
Florida. They are bound to break
out soon and after all, there are
still 140 games remaining."

Fr

F-----

NOTICE 1I
This is to inform you of an important change in procedure concerning the ELEC.
TION OF OFFICERS of your Hillel Foundation.
The forthcoming election of officers will be decided by a campus-wide vote. This
will give you and all Jewish students an equal opportunity to hold office.
To seek an executive office at Hillel (President, Vice President, Treasurer, or
Secretary) pick up a petition at the secretary's office. Return your petition by 1:00
P.M. this Sunday, May 3. There will be no write-in candidates.

MAY IS BIG MONTH:
Meetings To DecideImports'_Fate

ath-

getting its legislation passed be-
fore this year's Pan American
Games and the 1960 Olympic
Games, when recruiting is ex-
pected to be at a higher peak than
ever.
Expects Lively Discussion
Doug Roby, of Ypsilanti, ex-
pects the IOC to reach a "lively
point of discussion" on the mat-
ter. He said that the problem is
projected because "according to
Olympic rules, Americans are pro-
fessionalizing the foreign ath-
letes."
lHe pointed to scholarships -
the big drawing card of the im-
ports originally - as the major
fault.
"IOC rules say that the athlete
is entitled only to 'travel and keep'
while he is en route, or at, a meet,"
declared Roby, "Thus, even the
Big Ten program is not in bounds
with the rules."
Want Free Education
Most athletes are drawn to
America because they want a free
education along with better coach-
ing, facilities and competition. The
United States is the only !country
in the world that gives athletic
scholarships.
Kenneth L. Wilson, President of
the American Olympic Commit-
tee and Big Ten Commissioner,
added that the IOC would prob-
ably just bar imports who received
athletic scholarships.
The possible NCAA legislation,
mainly concerned with foreign
domination of American cham-
pionships, will take place next
week when the governing Council
of the organization meets.
Wilson reported:
"They (the NCAA) will con-
sider suggested legislation that
any foreign athlete must be in
residence in the United States for
three years before he is allowed
to compete.
"It is further suggested that
because of the proximity of Ca-
nada and Mexico, where there is
a normal exchange of students,
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