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April 29, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'''Y'

WEDNESDAY, AP

yHE1, .. IGA ALYWDE1AA

i

Vichigan

Tennis

Team

Opens

Rain Postpones 'M'.Nine's
Game at Western Michigan

1959 Season at Detroit Today

By GARY WRIGHT
Tennis takes over the local sport
scene this afternoon as the Maize
and Blue, led by captain Jon
Erickson, make their 1959 debut,'
invading the home courts of the
University of Detroit.

Erickson, Coach Bill Murphy's
number one man, after playing
first singles will then team up with
Gerry Dubie, last year's Michigan
state champion as the number
one doubles team.

Dubie, a newcomer from Ham-
tramck, will also hold down the
number two spot in the singles
matches.
Second Doubles
In the third and fourth singles,
respectively, are returning letter-
man Bob Sassone and Larry Zait-
zeff, a transfer from Toledo. Zait-
zeff and Wayne Peacock are slated
to start as Murphy's number two
doubles combination.
Peacock, also a returning letter
winner from last season, will play
sixth singles.
The number three doubles team
will consist of lettermen John
Wiley and Frank Fulton. Fulton
has also been picked by Murphy
for fifth singles.
Detroit, coached by Dick Tad-
donio, has found rough sledding
in the early part of the season.
They were stopped in their opener
by Hillsdale, 8-1, and last Tues-
day Wayne State found the going
comparatively easy as they drop-
ped the Titans, 9-0.
Two Lettermen
Taddonio's biggest problem can
be found in that it has only two
returning lettermen, captain Jim
Drinan and senior Jim Stapleton
from which to build his squad.
The team is composed, along

with Drinan and Stapleton, of six
sophomores and three juniors on
the 11-man roster. Bill Moloney,
and ex-GI, is Taddonio's top
junior.
Bill Kiesznowski from U. of D.
High, William Hershey of Red-
ford, and Ed Gobel of St. Ignatius
in Cleveland are among the top
sophomore prospects.
Last year the Wolverines smashed
Detroit, 9-0, in their only meeting.
The Titans ended their season
with a poor won-lost record of
3-11.

SKY-HIGH HOPES-Michigan's track team should have a bright
future if freshmen like Steve Williams continue to progress. Above,
Williams is clearing 6'5/" for a Michigan Open record.

BY DAVE LYON
Rain in Kalamazoo yesterday
forced cancellation of the sched-
uled baseball game between Mich-
igan and Western Michigan.
It was the sceond time this sea-
son that the Wolverines were
idled by weather. A scheduled
doubleheader at Central Michigan
April 11 was snowed out.-
The possibilities that any of the
three games will be played is re-
mote. The Broncos are slated to
play a single game here May 12,
but Michigan Coach Don Lund
said they probably wouldn't con-
sent to a mid-week doubleheader.
Road Trip
Lund, whose team takes a four-
game road trip this weekend,
didn't like the postponemnent, even
though it did afford his players
to rest up for this weekend's ac-
tivity. "Every game we play gives
us just that much more exper-
ience," he said.
He indicated he will probably
use either_ or both George Weem-
hoff and Joe Brefeld to pitch in
tomorrow's non-conference en-
gagement at Notre Dame. He will
choose from Gordon Rinckey, Al
Koch, Nick Liakonis, and Bob
Marcereau for Friday's Big Ten
game at Indianan and the double
bill at Ohio State the next day.
The string of eight successive
away games will conclude with the
Wayne State contest at Detroit,

May 5. The wolverines' next
home contest is against North-
western May 8.
Leading Batter
Slugging third baseman Dave
Brown still leads the Wolverines
in batting, number of hits, and
runs batted in, as a result of last
weekend's three-game set with
Michigan State.
Brown collected four hits in 12
at bats, his average declining 15
points to .385. He has 20 hits and
13 RBIs for the season.
Outfielder John Halstead bene-
fited most from Michigan State
pitching, collecting six hits in 13
times to raise his average to .316.
Outfielder Wilber Franklin, hit-
ting .375 before the State series,
went only three-for-13, dropping
to .310. "He was a victim of bad'
breaks," Lund said. "He was hit-
ting the ballrright on the nose.
Wilber's improving with every
game."

1

BRIGHT FUTURE PREDICTED:
Freshmen Thi'nc lads Show Promise

,. {

SEASON OPENER-Michigan tennis Captain Jon Erickson will
be playing number one singles this afternoon when the Wolverines
meet the University of Detroit on the Titans' home courts.

L> I

California's Climate, Facilities Best
For Tennis Says Wolverines' Murphy

American youngsters should be
singing the strains of "California,
Here I Come," according to varsity
tennis coach Bill Murphy, who
cites the Golden Bear State as the
ideal training ground for prospec-
tive tennis players.
"The weather would naturally
be the main reason for this prefer-

v

ence. The sunshine and mild cli-
mate are a natural inducement to
anyone," said Murphy.
"Also, the state has excellant
facilities for playing tennis. The
great number of professional ten-
nis players and tennis teachers in
California makes learning the fine
points of the game simpler. In

i

I

Major League Standings

I

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Los Angeles 10 5 .667
Milwaukee 7 4 .636
San Francisco 9 6 .600
Cincinnati 7 6 .538
Chicago 7 7 .500
Philadelphia 5 7 .417
Pittsburgh 5 8 .385
St. Louis 4 11 .267
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco at Philadelphia,l
St. Louis at Cincinnati, rain
Chicago at Milwaukee, rain
Only games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Philadelphia
St. Louis at Milwaukee
Chicago at Cincinnati
San Francisco at Pittsburgh

AMERICAN

GB
1
1
2
2%
3%
4
6
rain

Cleveland
Chicago
Baltimore
Kansas City
washington
New York
Boston
Detroit

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
10 4 .714
9 5 .643
9 5 .643
7 7 .500
7 8 .467
6 7 .462
6 7 .462
1 12 .077

GB
1
1
3
3%
3%
3lz

addition, interest is stimulated
and maintained through numerous
tournaments and competitive
matches."
Though California is ideally
suited for playing tennis, other
parts of the country have pro-
duced some outstanding tennis
stars. The successes of such greats
as Vic Seixias (Philadelphia), Ron
Holmberg (New York) and Ham
Richardson (Baton Rouge), point
to the fact that tennis stars are
not confined to one part of. the
country.
It is true, however, that prospec-
tive tennis greats may run into
difficulty in finding good tennis
facilities outside California. For
example, the city of Chicago has
found that its tennis facilities are
wholly inadequate to meet the
needs of the public.
As a result of severely limited
facilities, good tennis prospects are
turning toward other sports such
as basketball. baseball and foot-
ball.

By JIM BENAGH
Michigan's predominately un-
derclassman track team could be
headed for another banner year
next spring if five talented fresh-
men continue to progress.
The classy yearlings are high-
jumper Steve Williams, distance
sensation Ergas Leps, shot-putter
Tom Seifert, hurdler Bennie Mc-
Rae and broad jumper Dick Rau.
Williams, an unheralded small-
town newcomer, jumped 6'51/2" in
last week's Michigan Open - al-
ready establishing himself as Big
Ten championship caliber.
Sets Record
The jump, which set a now
Open record, equaled his high
school best -- recorded for Boyne
City High, a little Northern Mich-
igan school of about 200 students.
The same area produced Mark
Booth, of Cadillac, who was an 'M'
champion in the event.
Williams has reached 6'6" in
practice and has aspirations of
6'10".
Leps is one of the finest pros-
pects to enter Michigan in years.
He climaxed his competitive sea-
son wth a 1:53.5 half mile in the
Penn Relays last weekend.
Set Records
All winter long, the 19-yr.-old
Canadian set Michigan freshman
Caddies Needed
Jack Blott, University Golf
Course Manager, announced.
that caddies are needed for the
next three Saturdays, May 2, 9,
and 16, in addition to the fol-
lowing weekend of May 22-23
for the Big Ten Meet. All Mich-
igan students interested should
contact Blott at the course.

I

indoor marks from 600 yards
through the mile run.
Leps, who has been running
competitively for only three years,
had a 4:13.6 mile in the Hamilton
(Ont.) Highlanders Meet last
summer. The American high
school best is 4:13.2.
Seifert, of Ft. Wayne, Ind., has
spent most of his first year at
Michigan working with weights to
build up his strength. Thus, he
has not put well in competition.
He has bettered 60' with the 12-
lb. shot in high school.
Rated High
Track Coach Don Canham calls
Seifert "one of the strongest shot
putters I've seen." Canham has
hopes that Seifert will help make
up for the points lost by pole
vaulters Mamon Gibson and Eeles
Landstrom.

McRae could be the key to
Michigan's power in the Confer-
ence next year because most of
the outstanding high hurdlers will
be graduated this spring. The
Newport-News, Va., yearling is
trying to earn a football berth
this spring.
A Canadian, Rau jumped 24' in
last summer's British Empire
trials.

PERSONALITY
HAIRSTYLING
is our aim!
" SUAVE
" SMART
* INDIVIDUALISTIC
10 haircutters
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

Batting
Zigeler
Brown
Marshall
Roman
Halstead
Mogk
Franklin
Dickey
Struczewski
Syring
Danovich
Kucher
Fead

NOTICE I
This is-to inform you of an important change in procedure concerning the ELEC-
TION OF OFFICERS of your Hillel Foundation.
The forthcoming election of officers will be decided by a campus-wide vote. This
will give you and all Jewish students an equal opportunity to hold office.
To seek an executive office at Hillel (President, Vice President, Treasurer, or
Secretary) pick up a petition at the secretary's office. Return your petition by 1:00
P.M. this Sunday, May 3. There will be no write-in candidates.

Statistics
AB RR UBI.Avg.
3 1 2 1 .667
52 10 20 13 .395
24 6 8 4 .333
59 10 19 9 .322
57 6 18 7 -.316
54 6 17 2 .315
29 4. 9 3 .310
39 6 11 5 .282
55 7 13 2 .235
30 1 6 2 .200
12 1 2 0 167
32 1 4 1 .125
1 0 0 9 .000

r

k,

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 8, Kansas City 3
Baltimore at Detroit, wet grounds
New York at Chicago, rain
Boston at Cleveland, rain
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at Kansas City
Baltimore at Detroit
New York at Chicago
Only games scheduled.

,,,,,,....

FOREIGN ATHLETE RECRUITING PROBLEM:
Controversial Sub ject Debated by College Leaders
(ThrdIna eresonfoein th

(third in a series on foreign ath-
letes in American colleges.)
By JIM BENAGH
"Milers: If you can do better
thar 4:15 and want an Ameri-
can education, contact . . ."--
Advertisement by an American
college coach in an 'European
sports magazine.
The problems of using foreignj
athletes are the problems of re-
cruiting, Most critics of the for-
eign athlete movement in Ameri-
can colleges have agreed.
Kenneth L. "Tug" Wilson, pres-
ident of the United States Olym-
pic Committee, has emphasized
that "some very unusual recruit-
ing tactics by some of the colleges
and universities in the United
States" are the reasons for pro-
tests by many nations through-
out the world.
"They have protested so vigor-
ously to the International Olym-
pic Committee," replied Wilson,
"that it is on the agenda at the
next meeting to consider the pos-
sibility of barring any of their
athletes who accept athletic schol-
arships in the U. S. from compet-
ing in the Olympics representing
their own country."

Wilson said if such a plan was
adopted, it would put a "decid-
ed curb" on star athletes coming
to America.
However, men like Michigan
State's Clarence "Biggie" Munn
would discourage such trends of
thought.
"We Americans recruit in al-
most everything," he said. "My-
self? I'm for recruiting anyone-
rcientists, business people, and
athletes. America was built on
using the best there is."
He, like Michigan's H. 0.
"Fritz" Crisler, lets his staff have
a free hand in recruiting - as
long as they stay within the Big
Ten and NCAA rules.
Michigan Talent
"We would naturally like to
have our squads made up of Mich-
igan, boys," added Munn, "We
wouldn't want our coaches to re-
cruit an ALL-foreign track team."
At Michigan, the actual con-
tacts with the foreign athletes are
broken into three classes:
1) Outright recruiting - where
the coaches comb newspapers for
prospects, then go out and con-
tact them directly;

2) Athletes are referred by their
coaches and alumni, or write di-
rectly;
3) And, the self-perpetuating
process-where athletes from one
area keep flowing to Michigan, or
former athletes from that area
convince them of the school's
values.
Deny 'Hustling'
Except for 'Canadian athletes,
Michigan coaches deny any out-
right "hustling" of international
stars.
"There are just too many of
them," swim coach Gus Stager
said. "Besides, it's much easier to
work for kids near us."
Track coach Don Canham
claims that none of his four "im-
ports," who won individual Big
Ten titles last March, were re-
cruited directly.
The coaches didn't know of
Canadian Pete Stanger until he
showed up for practice in his
freshman year. A New York track
club coach suggested to Bahaman
Tom Robinson that he contact
Canham.
Wrote to Canham
Les Bird, of little British An-
tigua, wrote to Canham. Former
Canadian Olympic star McDonald
Bailey referred Tony Seth, of
British Guiana, to Michigan.
None of the four were close to
established stars before they en-
rolled.
Stanger was a "fair sprinter;"
Robinson had run 100 meters in
:10.6 (equivalent to :09.8 for 100
yards) in the 1956 Olympics; Bird
had done over 23' in the broad
jump; and Seth had run 440 yards
in about :50.
Paul Palmer and Grant McKee,
a pair of Canadians on football
scholarships, were referred to
Michigan by Jim Trimble, Hamil-
ton Tiger-Cat coach.
Direct Recruiting
Hockey coach Al Renfrew, gym
coach Newt Loken, and Canham
all admit they do direct recruit-
ing in Canada. But all three point

that freshman swimmer Karri
Kaykho here and helped Mauri
Jourmakki get a scholarship to
Eastern Michigan. Both recruits
are from Helsinki, Landstrom's
home town.
Because there are so many ath-
letes who want to come to Amer-
ica to study and compete, athletic
leaders have not found much il-
legal recruiting. Most of the lead-
ers said that if there is any, it
still can't reach the intensity of
football and basketball violations.
But Commissioner Wilson, who
said he investigated many cases
in his Conference and could find
no illegal recruiting, warned:
"I do feel that this must be
carefully watched and, if neces-
sary, restrictive action taken."
CAMPUS
FA VORITES
4.
SHIRTS
$4.00 up
Here are the "smart" shirts col-
lege men like to wear. They're
neatly proportioned to fit com.

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