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April 28, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,

VIICHIGAN DELEGATION LISTENS:
Officials Decide on Policies for New Hockey League

Michigan Nine To Meet
Broncos at Kalamazoo

F

By MIKE GILLMAN
A Michigan delegation listened
as officials of the newly-formed
Western Intercollegiate Hockey
League met in closed session Sat-
urday and Sunday at Minneapolis
to lay down future league policy.
Among the major items on the
agenda were 'rules designed to
curb brawling and the installations
of a playoff to determine future
Western entries for the NCAA
finals.
A rules committee decided that

players who are involved in fights
will be ejected from both the game
they are then in and the following
game. Any player who strikes an
official is out for the season. Uni-
form enforcement will be guaran-
teed by officiating clinics prior to
the season.
Next season's Western represen-
tatives will have to play in a four-
team tourney before going to the
NCAA playoffs in Boston on
March 16-18. The first and fourth

place teams will vie for one spot
and the second and third for the
other. Each pairing will play a
two-game series, with the winner
determined on total goals.
Michigan coach Al Renfrew be-
lieves that this playoff will keep
spectator interest high through-
out the season since all four posi-
tions wouldn't be filled until the
closing weeks of the season.
Said Renfrew, "I feel that we
accomplished a lot. We were there

Athletes Aid

Good Will

'Ic

(Second in a series on foreign ath-
letes in American colleges.)
By JIM BENAGH
"Attending an American col-
lege was one of the most won-
derful experiences of my life."
-Al Renfrew, Michigan hockey
coach, a native of Toronto, Can-
ada.
* * *r
Foreign athletes in American
colleges are in a dilemma.,
The petty jealousies by Ameri-
can coaches and by the fans'and
coaches of their respective home-
lands occasionally have over-
shadowed the athlete's accom-
plishments. '
Many coaches have become pre-
occupied with the foreigners' dom-
ination of American champion-
ships, while back in thechomeland
coaches and fans are concerned
mainly .about losing their stars.
Meanwhile, little publicity is
given to the athletes' contributions
to international good will and the
United States sports, or to the,
betterment of the individual's edu-
cation.
Munn Promotes' America
Michigan State Athletic Direc-
tor Clarence "Biggie" Munn, Mich-
igan track coach Don Canham
and Navy swim coach John Hig-
gins have made state department
Well Represented
Michigan has been well-rep-
resented by international ath-
letes in the past few years.
In the last five years, for
example, "M" winners have in-
cluded athletes from Ireland,
Scotland, England, Sweden,
Finland, Canada, Bahama Is-
lands, Hungary, ,British An-
tigua, British Guiana, Mexico,
Denmark and Germany.

Michigan State has about 600 en-
rolled.
As contributors to America, for-
eign athletes were credited by
Canham for coloring meets and
bettering competition in the
United States.
"Look at Ron Delaney," said
Canham. "There's no question
that he did more to draw track
crowds these past couple years
than any other single factor.
"At the same time, our milers
had a chance to run against him
and see how good they really are."
Smith cited foreign athletes
like NCAA two-mile champion
Alex Henderson (of Australia), as
"being nothing but an incentive
to our squad."
Henderson Works Hard

to see what the league had to
offer. The decision as to whether
or not we join is up to the Board
in Control now."n
No Mandatory Schedule
Renfrew was especially pleased
to see that the WCHL would have
no mandatory schedule.. He ex-
plained that if a school feels that
another school isn't living up to
its standards, that school could
be dropped from the schedule
without the complete disbanding
of the league. This was one of the
defects of the defunct WIHL.
The decision was also made to
limit the number of games to be
played by members, 30 next season
and 28 thereafter. Michigan is
limited by a school ruling to 24
plus post-season playoffs.
Renfrew was accompanied to'
the meeting by Marcus Plante,
faculty member of the Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Ath-
letics.
I-M
SCORES
SOFTBALL
RESIDENCE HALLS "A"
Allen Rumsey 12, Winchell 8
Gomberg 24, Wenley 1
Van Tyne 10, Cooley 4
Strauss 7, Reeves 4
Michigan 38, Williams 6
Greene 14, Kelsey 10
Scott 11, Adams 7
Chicago 12, Hayden 9
Lloyd 9, Huber 4

By TOM WITECKI
Michigan's baseball team will be
playing the third of eight consecu-
tive road games this afternoon
when they meet powerful Western
Michigan in a non-conference
game at Kalamazoo.
The Broncos, a perennial small
college baseball power, will be any-
thing but "a soft touch" for the
local nine, as they possess one of
their strongest clubs in recent
years.
Included on Western Michigan's
impressive list of diamond victims
are Michigan State, Iowa and
other Big Ten teams. The Broncos
also hold two previous wins over
the Wolverines, garnered in the
Florida State Tournament, that
Coach Don Lund's squad would
like to avenge.
On the mound for the Wolver-
ines, as they try for their sixth
win against nine defeats, will be
either righthander Al Koch or
southpaw Nick Liakonis.
Both of the junior hurlers took
it on the chin in last weekend's
series against Michigan State, each
picking up a loss. Despite these
defeats, Lund strongly indicated
that both pitchers would get start-
ing assignments in, one of the
three Conference games this week-
end.
In addition to the three Big
Ten games, one against Indiana,
Friday, and two against Ohio
State, Sunday, the Michigan team
will also meet 'the Irish of Notre
Dame at South Bend Thursday.
Lund is still optimistic about his

club's chances in the Conference
title race despite the fact that
his squad took only one of three
from Michigan State to open the
season.
He said, "This club has a lot of
potential and showed some of it
in the State series. The problem
is how to get all of the potential
out of the squad."
Added to the club's growing list
of assets was sophomore Bob Mar-
cereau, who pitched a fine game
Saturday, giving up only one run
and six hits, to give the Wolverines
their lone win against the Spar-
tans..
Faculty Golf
All male faculty members inter-
ested in golf lessons sponsored by
the Men's Physical Education De-
partment are invited to enroll to-
day.
They should come to the Univer-
sity Blue Course Club House at
5:15 p.m. or call Waterman Gym-
nasium before 5. Lessons will be
held twice a week from 5-6 p.m.
A nominal fee will be charged.

L

I

rI

trips abroad to promote America
through athletics, and all agree
that the competition has won as
many, or more, friends as our
diplomats.
"Likewise a foreign athlete .. .
returns to his country and gives his
people a story of America they are
going to believe, because they will
know he is speaking the truth,"
replied Arizona State Athletic Di-
rector Clyde B. Smith, whose
school has been a leader in the
international movement in his
area.
"That will do more to develop
good will between our respective
countries than all the money and
resources being used to build it in
other ways."
These same men will also point
out that American schools are
becoming internationalized-thus,
justifying the use of the import.
Athletes from Abroad
Michigan, which has had ath-
letes from 13 countries in the last
five years, has 1,524 students from
79 nations in its student body.
Major League
Standings

Asmodeus, here, is onto a good thing.

IL

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.
Cleveland 10 4 .714
Chicago 9 5 .643
Baltimore 9 5 .643
Kansas City 7 6 r .538
New York 6 7 .462
Boston 6 7 .462
Washington 6 8 .429
Detroit 1 12 .077

GB
-
1
2
3
3Y
4
8%

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at Kansas City (N)
New York at Chicago (N)
Boston at Cleveland (N)
Baltimore at Detroit (N)

NATIONAL
Los Angeles
Milwaukee
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
St. Louis

LEAGUE
W L Pet.
10 5 .667
7 4 .636
9 6 .600
7 6 .538
7 7 .500
5 7 .417
5 8 .384
4 11 .267

GB
-
1
1
2
2%
3Y
4
6

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco at Philadelphia, rain
Chicago at Milwaukee, rain
Los Angeles 9, Pittsburgh 3
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Philadelphia (N)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (N)
Chicago at Milwaukee
Only games scheduled
PERSONALITY
HAIRSTYLING

is our aimI

I '

I

I

II f AMVVJV AL aV .wc 13:

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