100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 26, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUN

D

ntinuous
Today
n Io'clock

I

DIAL
NO 8-6416

Theatre
Notes

'U' Television Prograwts
To Examine Cultures

U

Proucdly We Present
"A UNIVERSAL EXPERIENCE
APPROPRIATE TO THE
SCREENS OF THE WORLD
'Pather PIanchali' is a picture of India of
a sort we have not yet had-ndt even in Jean
Renoir's 'The River' nor in Robert Flaherty's
'Elephant Boy.' This is a communication of
human experience out of the heartand
fiber of Bengal. It is the creation of
an artist."
-Bosley Crowfher, K. Y. Times

By JUDITH DONER
"Trap Doors," subtitled "A

Tra-

vesty for Slow as Well as Fast
Feet" will be presented at 4:10
p.m. tomorrow in the Arena
Theatre of the Frieze Building.
Written by Alfred Kreymborg,
a modern American poet, the show
is a colorful fantasy. . . a poetic
adventure in fun. It takes place in
an imaginary village street, early
on any spring morning . . almost
anywhere.
Surprise Elements

r"A truly great, original picture."
--Arch. Winstenn, Po

n,

"Stunningly beautiful, a major work
of art." -Tin*
Directed by SatyezJlt Bar
Iesenred by Edward Harrison
. ar a a

ele
th(
of
re
pe(
sh

ad
un
is
Cijb
fe
Si
Jo
la
Sunday at 8:00 e
I~AN
w
Schoedsack and Cooper's n
on
"KINGKONG" A:4
At
wi
with
FAY WRAY BRUCE CABOT
Cartoon
*
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

Because the effectiveness of
Trap Doors" lies in the surprise
ement, let it suffice to say that
he plot is concerned with a group
local shopkeepers and their
lationships to two particular
eople - shy Mr. Tentative and
harp Miss Daisy.
Both sets and costumes are wild
dventures into the realm of the
nusual.
Rick Schiller, '59, will " direct a
ast which will include Linda Dav-
on, '61, Tom Jennings, '62, Bar-
ara Cohen, '62, and Terry Rode-
r, '61. Carol Jones, Spec., Joan
inger, '60, Ellen Schiller, '61,
ohn Mussin, '61, and Kathy Gil-
y, '60, will also take part.
Designs Sets
Sets are designed by Ann Steg-
nga, '69, with costumes by Sally
yn Rosenheimer, Grad. Peg For-
ard, Grad., is choreographer.
An interlude from George Ber-
ard Shaw's "The Applecart" is
n the experimental playbill at
:10 p.m. Wednesday in Trueblood
uditorium. Patrick Chester, '60,
ill direct the play.

Culture is the topic of two Un-
versity television programs to be
shown today.
At 1 pm.. on WWJ-TV, Ch. 4,1
two Europeans will examine Eu-
rope's common culture, and "Ac-
cent" at 9:45 a.m. will feature four
citizens of Muslim nations who
will explore the culture of the 24
states of "The Muslim World,"
Featured on "Accent" will be a
radio broadcaster fromthe United
Arab Republic, a lieutenant in
the Turkish Navy, a former mem-
ber of Pakistan's Atomic Energy
Commission and a graduate stu-
dent in linguistics from Indonesia.
Reveal Conditions
They will tell of present condi-
tions and hopes for the future
held by the over 400 million Mus-
lims living in an area three times
as large as the United States.
This program is one of two
which presents an explanation of
the basic beliefs of Islam, the "oft-
niisunderstood" religion which
forms a cultural bond among the
diverse peoples of the Muslim
world.
, The Islamic religion was first
abused during the crusades. Before
that time the Near East was
viewed by Europeans with wonder,
but after the wars began the bad
points of the culture, and not the
good, were emphasized.
It is this latter view that is
associated with Islamic culture in
the minds of most of the public.
The two Europeans, an Italian
and a Frenchman, will tell, how
their countries are part of the
common European culture of the
post-war years.
Glauco Cambon of the English
department and originally from
Milan, Italy and Michel Benamou

of the French department from
Paris, France, both visiting lec-
turers, will join their host, Prof.
Roy Pierce of the political science
department.
Presents IdeasM .
Benamou declares that in the
post-war years the most signifi-
cant contribution made in France
is the existentialist literature
which, combined with a focus on
man living ina world of serious
moral choices, has struck a respon-
sive chord in the entire Western.>
world.
Italy's most significant contri-
bution, Cambon believes, is the
concentration on the problems of
the average man, as opposed to
the intellectual, and also concen-
trating on the search for a solu-
tion to his problems.
WXYZ-TV will also present an-
other University program. At 9
a.m. three, current research pro- RDLHS KT
jects at the University aredocu- RUDOLPH SERKIN
mented with the actual people in- .. to Open festival
volved along with films of their
undertakings.
The three projects deal with
atomic' energy, aphasia, and new
kinds of art.
Conduct Research
In atomic energy, research on
many things, including nutrition,
is being conducted. J. B. Bullock,
nuclear engineer from the Phoenix
Memorial Project demonstrates
radiation detectors and shows how
to artificially make things radio-
active.
Bullock will demonstrate how ir-
radiated food has infinite reper-
cussion in the field of nutrition.
Prof. Harlan Bloomer of the
speech department and speech
clinic director will describe his
work in speech rehabilitation and
Richard Jennings of the architec-
ture and~ design school's art de-
partment will show films of his
unusual fountains in shopping SIDNEY HARTH
centers around the country. . .. to perform
Wayne State Show To Present
'Midsummer Night's Dream'
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer
Night's Dream" is the annual all- the famous overture, composed
campus production which Wayne when he was 17 years old, and 12
State University will present at other numbers composed 17 years
8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and later.
May 7 through 9. .Detroit Symphony Orchestra
leader Valter Poole will conduct
The arts of drama, music and the Wayne State Orchestra.
dance are combined in the poetic
fantasy, which is Shakespeare's
first comedy masterpiece. Men-
delssohn's incidental music will be A ppia6ti
played by the WSU Symphony Vi
Orchestra, while the Concert Choir
and the Dance Workshop also and
perform. d PasErts
The incidental music. includes 24-HOUR, SERVCE

ALL-CAMPUS
BOOK DRIVE,

- MV

IN

:"'^k{'c,'ix{:; :Y. '{+. i'£#' :'"r ::; :.s::;: ';f ;:k; "sri,.'. : ai -i: ~"s# 3: ;'"t:: +"': :Y i' ±{: .'::^:r r 3s5':'; C'.."+;f3?:"'.,3$
.r+'.:.r :-:;: x":'yrrc'i:+t;::k '"'":":>:: ::. '"::ir: -;:+:::-,; ::Y ::" "v3:";.:- .';;;',y r'^"S ;t:.r : ..:£ ;:; J.,....t.<:.
y.. ". p 4}
.. kk ::1rn.r. ..,.r, .'r ;;:;3:;"r ..;::.:.# ::;..t,:':" ..t.i ;: ra: ' -t;? " £ ; :".;i#:: { .:?:;y: %
?z '' Ntv'.#. r.:""kkx '.. .J1Y '"' ... ......,..':4:8s ..>.3 ?E:4 ,:i2 ..fi .:{.. ,.. 3...._:'{.. _.......t+'.

April 27-May 1 st

JIF

SGC

JrPH

r

m

U

I

Ia

7The

7T4eat, e 'et

£49 The '(ear'

I

CHARLTON HESTON

LEADING BROADWAY AND
HOLLYWOOD STARS IN FIVE WEEKS
OF SUPERB ENTERTAINMENT
DRAMA SEASON

Drama Films
To Be Shown
A lecture and films explaining
two forms of classical Japanese
Drama will be presented tonight at
7:30 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
The films will illustrate both
Noh, (serious drama) and Kyogen
(comedy). Noh and Kyogen
reached the height of their devel-
opment in the fifteenth century
and have been preserved to the
present day.
The lecture will be given by
Prof. Seth P. Ulman, formerly of
the University of California, be-
fore the -films are shown. Prof.
Ulman produced the films during
the two-year period he spent in
Japan on'a Fulbright grant.

CONRAD NAGEL

MAY 11-JUNE 13

May 11-16 CHARLTON HESTON in "Macbeth"
with JACQUELINE BROOKES and ERNEST GRAVES
May 18-23 LEON AMES and CHARLES HOHMAN in "Howie"
May 25-30 PAUL HARTMAN and, EARLE HYMAN
in "Waiting For Godot"

June 1-6
June 8-13

CHARLES HOHMAN in "Summer of the 17th Doll"
CONRAD NAGEL in "The Happiest Millionaire"

SEASON TICKET PRICES

Evenings (Monday thru Thursday)
Evenings (Friday and Saturday)
Matinees (Thursday and Saturday)

MAIN
$14.00,

FLOOR,
12.00

$14.00,

BALCONY
12.00,

10.00
11.50

$16.50, 14.00

$16.50,14.00,

$10.00,

7.50

$10.00,

7.50

Millions of times a
drivers and students

year
keep

MAIL ORDERS NOW
Box Office Open May 4

awake with safe NoDiz
Let NOD-zalert you
through college, too
NoDoz keeps you alert with caf-
feine-the same pleasant stim-
ulant you enjoy in coffee. Fast-
er, handier, more reliable: non-

A Special 'Student Rate for any 3 plays

I 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan