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April 25, 1959 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN MAILY

'adatz Pitches Spartans

PHOTOGRAPHERS EXHIBIT 'WARES':
Photo Display Held in Administration Building

0

Win over Wolverines

(Continued from Page 1)

core from second on right fielder
ohn Russel's single. Beaten to
he plate by outfielder Jack
[ogk's perfect throw, the tank-
ke Spartan tried to knock the
all out of catcher Dickey's hand.'
ut the Michigan backstop, who
pent last fall as a linebacker
ennie Oosterbaan's squad, set his
eet firmly and their huge Spartan
ion found himself in the dust at
he side of the plate much to the
elight of the partisan fans.
This, however, was one of the.
ew times all day the enthusiastic
rowd was able to raise a cheer
s Radatz kept Michigan bats
rider control, striking out six in
ne stretch retiring 12 batters in
row.
Wolverine hurlers Al Koch and
ob Stabrylla had moderate suc-
ess on the mound holding the
eputedly-powerful M I c h i g a n.
tate squad to nine hits.
Koch, who gave up single runs

in the first and fifth innings, was
charged with the loss.
Spartan second baseman Jerry
Lumianski, the game's first batter
started things off with a ground
single. Advancing to second on
Russell's sacrifice, he raced home
when Al Luplow lined a hit off
first baseman Bill Roman's glove.
In the fifth Lumianski doubled
down the left field line to drive
Dick Golden home with the Spar-
tan's second run. Lumianski and
Luplow with two and three hits
apiece paced the Saprtan hitting
attack, along with Spartan stand-
out Dean Look, who had two for,
four.
The Michigan attack was fairly
anemic before Radatz's offerings
with their only run before the
ninth coming on an error by
Michigan State shortstop Golden.
Struczewski Lines Single
Gene Struczewski lined the first
of his two singles to center field
to start the inning and moved to

second on first baseman Bill Ro-
man's grounder. Third baseman
Dave Brown then smashed a hard
grounder that went through Gold-
en's legs with Struczewski scoring
easily on the play.
The afternoon started as if it
would be a pleasant one for the
Wolverines when Radatz walked
the first two players to face him.
But the home fans were quickly
disappointed when Radatz got the
side out without a run, and walked
side out without a run and walked
only one man for the remainder
of the game.
The Wolverines will be trying
to duplicate a feat of last season
this afternoon when they take on
the Spartans with lefthanders
Nick Liakonis and Bob Marcereau
scheduled to throw. Last spring
Michigan came back to sweep two
games form the Spartans 10-1
games from the Spartans 10-1
4-2.

Rapid
MICHIGAN
Lumianski, 3b
Russell, rf
Luplow, cf
Look, 2b
Monczka, e
Fleser, If
Schudlich, lb
Golden, s
Radatz, p
TOTALS
MICHIGAN
Struczewski, ss
Mogk, cf
Roman, lb
Brown, 3b
Franklin, If
Halstead, rf
Dickey, c
a--Syring
Kucher, 2b
Koch, p
Stabrylla, p
b-Marshall
c-Danovich
TOTALS
a-Ran for Dickey

Radatz
AB R H
5 1 2
4 0 1
4 0 3
4 0 2
4 0 0
3 1 0
3
AB R R
3 1 2

E RBI
0 1
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
00
0 0
1 0
01x
1 3
E RBI
0 0

YOUTH IN PASSING-The fairer sex, usually the subject in the
work of John Alley, is represented here by this scene taken in
Paris, along the Seine. His work as a photo correspondent over-
seas took him to nearly all parts of Europe.

GERMAN REFUGEE-The man with the faraway look in his eyes is a good friend of Louis Mar-
tonyi, who shot this picture. He was on his way to the United States, waiting for the bus which
would take him away from the camp in Germany where he had been living. His family had to
remain in Hungary, until he could call for them, once established in his new home. This is one of t
he many pictures Martonyi photographed In his native Germany.

3 0
3 0
4 0
4 0
4 1
4 0
0 0
3 0
2 0
0 0
2 0
1 0
33 2
In 9th.

0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
s

0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0a
0
0
1

0
0
0f
0
0
1f
0
0
0
0f
d
0

b-Struck out for Koch. in 7th.
c-Struck out for Stabrylla in 9th.
2B - Luplow, Look, Lumlaniski,
Radatz SB-Fleser.
MICHIGAN STATFE 100 010 001-3 9 1
MICHIGAN 001 000 001-2 6 1
PITCING SUMMARY
IP H BB SO R ER
Koch 7 6 0. 1 2 2
Radatz 9 6 3 6 1 0
Stabrylla 2 3 1 1 1 1
BIG TEN SCORES
Indiana 6, Iowa 4
Northwestern 5, Purdue 5 (tie)
(called at 8 innings, darkness)
Minnesota 9, Ohio State 0
Illinois 14, Wisconsin 1

NOT QUITE-Michigan State's Dean Look (right) has his flight
down Ferry Field's first base line wasted as Michigan's Bill Roman
pulls in the ball for an uncontested out. Look has consolation.
however, because the Spartans won, 3-2.

Bird Wins Penn Relays Broad Jump;
Robinson Injured Will Miss Finals

By The Associated Press
Lanky Les Bird laurelled Michi-
gan with individual honors yester-
day with a first place victory in
the broad jump at the Penn Re-
lays' mammoth two-day track car-
nival.
The 6'5" Wolverine star upset
favored Mike Herman of New York
University with a leap of 25'1%"4'
his best ever.
A damper was put on Bird's sur-
prise win, however, when it was
learned that Tom Robinson, Mich-
igan's sophomore star, will be out,
of action today for the relay finals.
The British Empire 220 - meter
champion, who anchored Michi-
gan to a :41.8 qualifying spot in
the quarter-mile relay, suffered a
slight muscle spasm and .said he
won't be able to run in the. final
against Abiline Christian today.
Was To Anchor Relays
.Robinson was also expected to,
anchor Michigan's 880-yd. and

mile relay teams. Michigan quali-
fied second in the half to favored.
Abilene Christian whose winning
time of :41.1 tied the meet record.
With Robinson out of the line-"
up Michigan was unable to qualify
in the 880-yd. relay, an event in
which it was expected to do well.
No qualifying heat was held in the
mile-relay yesterday.
In the 120-yd. high hurdles,
Michigan's Pete Stanger improved
on his last year's performance with
a qualifying fifth place. Stanger
was eliminated early last year, as
he failed to place in the qualify-
ing heat. Winston-Salem Teachers'
Elia Gilbert led the qualifiers with
a time of :14.2.
Pole Vault Today
Michigan's other individual en-
tries, Mamon Gibson and Eeles
Landstrom will be competing in
the pole vault today. Gibson is the
defending co - champion in the
event. Michigan is entered in to-
day's two-mile and sprint medleys
as well.
!Penn State whipped to an effort-
less 9:58.2 triumph in the distance

medley relay to .win the first of
the eight. major relay titles to be
decided in the gigantic meet. The
Nittany Lions, boasting one of the
greatest group of middle distance
runners ever assembled, won in a
breeze.
Bill Woodhouse anchoring the
half for Abilene Christian barely
fought off Morgan State anchor
man Verion Keller in the dash to
the tape. And to make matters
even more serious Villanova post-
ed a better qualifying clocking,
1:25.8, with Ed Collymore running
anchor..
Individual Victories
In other individual perform
ances, John Lawlor, from Boston
College smashed his own meet
record in the hammer throw with
a toss of 200'1012". The former
record which he set last year was
196'2".
Ohio State's Dave Buckley won
the discus throw with a 156'6"
effort.
The two-mile run was won by
SMU's An Ahlberg.

What does a professional pho-
tographer do in his spare time?
Why, take pictures, of course!
And the proof of this statement
may be found in.the photographic
exhibit in the basement of the
Administration Building.
The display contains examples
of the photographic art which the
seven photographers of the Uni-
versity Photographic Service have
done in their spare time. Done for
their own satisfaction, it is now
shown for the delight of all those
who have seenor will see this first
opportunity of these men to ex-
hibit their work.
Members of the Service are
photographers Fred Anderegg,
John Alley, Willy Dobos, Karl
Kalmbach, Bob Kalmbach, Karl
Kutas and Louis Martonyi.
All of these men, with widely
different backgrounds, have a
,wealth of experience to draw on
as subject matter for, their works.
Anderegg, supervisor, started the
department, and mapped out the
working situation-making it to-
day one of the finest in the Fcoun-
try. He has done work in all types
and phases of photography, and
has just recently returned from
the Near East, where he worked
with Dr. George Forsythe, Jr.,
chairman of the fine arts depart-
ment here, and Dr. Kurt Weitz-
mann of the archaeology depart-
ment of Princeton University, on
an expedition to the Byzantine
Monastery of Mt. Sinai.
Alley has been a professional
photographer since hewas 15. Be-
tween 1954, when he began his
work with the University, and
October of last year, when he re-
turned here, he worked as a photo-
graphic officer and public rela-
tions officer in the army medical
corps, resigning in Europe, but
staying there to' work as a photo
correspondent for the "Stars and
Stripes," an American military
newspaper now reaching a. circu-
lation of about 200,000.
Mr. Willy Dobos has been a
professional photographer for
30 years. While living in his native
Hungary, he owned his own por-
trait studio until it was destroyed
by the Russians. He continued
working as a photographer, how-
ever, running a state-owned por-
trait studio. He has been in Amer-
ica and working for the University
for two years.
Karl Kalmbach, a native of Ann
Arbor, has worked with the Uni-
versity for nine years. His interest
in photography began when he
was very young, and eventually
went from a hobby to a profession.
This was not true in the case
of his son, Bob Kalmbach, who
has been a member of the depart-
ment since 1954. He did not really

r

i

DRAMA-Karl Kalmbach, a native of Ann Arbor, spends much
time viewing with appreciation such' scenes as this sunset on
Hubbard Lake, as he is an avid fisherman. In this study, he has
caught the dramatic effect of the sunset on the sky, and the
shadow formations on the clouds.

ANN ARBOR WINTER-Nature and the out-of-doors is the
favorite subject matter of photographer Karl Kutasi, who photo-
graphed this scene of a woman and child taking a stroll past
Angell Hall. Here Kutasi concentrates on the scale of shades,
from the dark black of the trees to the gray of the building, to the
almost-blinding white of the snow.

begin to be interested in photog-
raphy until about then.
Karl Kutasi was an amateur
photographer at home in Budapest,
and it wasn't until 1948, while he
was living in Germany that he
began towork professionally. After
having seen much 'of Europe, he
came to America, and has worked
for the University since 1952.
In his early youth, Louis Mar-
tonyi learned photography from
his father,,spending a great deal
of time on his hobby, until he
finally began as- a professional
photographer in his native Ger-
many.
Drawing on their experience and
their use of techniques which they
have learned, developed, and ex-
perimented with, these men con-
tributed some of their finest works
-which are not just mere snap-
shots, but art-to -the basement
exhibit.

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
SUSAN SLOMAN
Pictures courtesy of
UNIVERSITY
PHOTO SERVICES

GIRL WITH MUFF-A special-
ist in portrait photography,
Willy Dobos gives us a typical
example of his work. He often
enjoys making his portraits a
little less formal by the 'intro.
duction of some object such as a
hat, or, in this case, a furry
muff.

44

BEGINS AT 1 P.M.:
Almost 300 Trackmen
Here for Michigan Open

JOHN, THE JANITOR - This
character study is of a man who
spent many years working at
Princeton University, where
Fred Anderegg snapped this pic-
ture of him.

By JIM BENAGH
Almost 300 athletes from 10
schools will be on hand at Ferry
Field at 1 p.m. today for the sec-
ond annual Michigan Open track
Included in the growing entry
field are freshmen, varsity and
non-college performers in the 18-
event program. Eight running
events (including the 300-yd. dash
and 600-yd. run), two standard
X a hurdle events, five field events
and three relays are on Director
Elmer Swanson's slate.
The meet was designed to coin-
cide with the big national relay
meets-like Penn and Drake-so
that the athletes who didn't make
Majo'tr Leagyue Standings

those trips would continue par-
ticipation.
Watch for Performances
But even this has not prevented
good performances.
Swanson sees a star-filled lineup
in the discus throw. Doug Cotter-
man, Ohio University, heads the
entrants but a pair of Ohio State
stars and Michigan freshman Bill
Radford could be very much in
the picture. The latter is suffering
from an injured index finger on
his throwing hand.
Dick Strawyer and Ted Storer,
members of OSU's Conference re-
lay champions, head the list of
runners.
Two-miler Dick Schwartz, quar-
termiler Frank Geist, hurdler Ron
Trowbridge and ihot put duo Ray
Locke and Tom Seifert, broad-
jumper Lou Williams and high
jumper Steve Williams lead Michi-
gan's entries.
See Freshmen
The meet gives Michigan fans

AiWERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
GB laana GB .7

GB

GB

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