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April 24, 1959 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-24

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t FRIDAY. APRIL 24, 1959

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1959 THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~A E!W

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&eteeh the /imej
By CARL RISEMAN

SPORT SHORTS:

Souchak Fires 66 for Tourney Lead

II

"Eager"

Beaver s

The New Coach
MICHIGAN'S BIG TEN opener with Michigan State at Ferry Field
this afternoon will provide baseball coach Don Lund with his
first real test of the season and of his coaching career. Lund suc-
ceeded Ray Fisher after his retirement at the end of the 1958 season-
his 38th year as coach of the Wolverines.
Followers of the sports page have been familiar with the name
of Don Lund for many years now. After graduating from Detroit's
Southeastern High School, where he excelled as an athlete, Lund
came to Michigan and starred on the football, basketball and base-
ball teams during the 1940s. Although mainly known for his base-
ball prowess, Lund accumulated nine letters, three in each sport.
Athletic Director Fritz Crisler, who was Lund's football coach
during the war years, recently called him an "instinctive athlete."
"He really knew how to make the plays," Crisler related. "I would
have to rate him with Bump (Elliott), Terry Barr, and Gene Derri-
cotte as. one of the best defensive football players I have ever seen."
However, it was as a baseball player that Lund was to achieve
athletic fame. He signed with Branch Rickey after graduating to
play with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Finally he came up to the majors
as a Detroit Tiger in 1949. In 1953, Lund was the regular Tiger right
fielder and hit .257. The following year Lund lost his job to a fellow
named Al Kaline. Lund was through as, a major leaguer but the
Tigers felt that he had accumulated too much baseball knowledge to
quit the game. He served as a scout and then as a coach for the Tigers
in 1957-58.
Experience
LUND HAS APPLIED his rich experience to his young Wolverines.
"You can't assume anything with these boys," he said. "You have
to start at the beginning and keep repeating." The new Michigan
coach definitely believes in conditioning. "We play to win, but the
boys have to be in. shape to play," he asserted. Lund: backs up his
statements by making his pitchers run laps. "A pitcher will tire during
a game if he isn't in good shape. We have them (the pitchers) run
after practice because th.ey don't have the chance to move in practice
like the other ball players do."
Lund talked extensively of his scouting experience. 'The most
disturbing thing to a scout or to anyone in baseball is to watch a
player with lots of ability who doesn't apply it. We signed a lot of
boys to professional contracts, they all have to have the mechanical
skills. But, if they didn't have the necessary drive, they would soon
be out. Every once in a while there comes along a player with
both great ability and desire - they're the Mickey Mantles, Stan
Musials and Ted Williamses."
I asked Lund about the scouting setup in the majors. "When I
was with Detroit, we had between 12 to 15 scouts, with each scout
having various sub-scouts. The sub-scouts rand the scouts kept tabs
on all types of ball players and when we found a real prospect, a
'blue chipper', we reported him to the front office. A major league
prospect has to have speed; a good throwing arm, ability to field and
hit. If he has the speed and the arm, we might be able to teach
a him the rest."
Crisler told why Lund had received the coaching job over other
possible candidates. "He is a high' class type of person," Crisler said,
"the type that you'd like to have your son play under. He has a won-
,derful background and imparts his knowledge and also is rich in
experience."
It appears to me that although Michigan has yet to play a Big
Ten baseball game this season, it definitely made a good. choice in
hiring Don Lund.

LAS VEGAS, Nev. OP) - Big
Mike Souchak fired a brilliant six-
under par 66 yesterday to take a
firm lead in the first round of the
$46,620 Tournament of Cham-
pions.
The 199-pound ex-Duke football
player, who has never played well
in this golf show, put together
rounds of 34-32 over the 7,000-
yard par 36-36-72 Desert Inn
Country Club course.
The display by the Grossinger,
N.Y., professional, with long driv-
ing and accurate approach shots,
put him three strokes in front of
his nearest rivals -eunheralded
Ernie Vossler of Midland, Tex.,
and Pete Cooper of Lakeland, Fla,

WALLY WEBER
... harks back to 1926

Arnold Palmer and Julius Boros
each had 35-35-70. Rounding out
the cast of eight players in the
select filed of 26 who managed to
break par were favored Gene
Littler, Ken Venturi, Doug San-
ders and last year's surprise win-
ner, Stan Leonard.
Palmer, the 1958 Masters cham-
pion, supplied the most spectacu-
lar shot, a hole-in-one on the 163-
yard 16th hole. The ball hit 10
or 15 feet in front of the hole and
rolled in.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
WV L Pct. GB
Cleveland 9 1 .9004-
New York 6 4 .600 3
Chicago 6 4 .600 3
Baltimore 6 5 .545 31J
Boston 5 5 .500 4
Kansas City 4 6 .400 5
Washington 4 7 .364 51
Detroit 1 9 .100 8
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 3, New York 2
Cleveland 10, Detroit 4
Baltimore 8, Boston 7
(Only games scheduled)
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Kansas City (N)
Chicago at Cleveland (N)
Boston at Washington (N)
(Only games scheduled)

PHILADELPHIA P) - Nation-
al Football League club owners
yesterday granted their players a
league-paid, hospitalization, med-
ical, life insurance and retirement
benefit plan.
The plan was accepted with
thanks by Players Association
representatives, led by Bill How-
ton of the Green Bay Packers, who
said:
"It is one of the finest things
ever to happen to pro football
players."
SNFL commissioner Bert Bell'an-
nounced the program which hel
said was approved unanimously
by the owners. He said the plan
would be \ administered by the
commissioner's office and two
trustees yet to be appointed.
BE
COOL!
Crewcuts of
715 N. University

BICYCLE SHOP

-II

CHURCH
EAST UNIVERSITY
CAMPUS
STATE
ukilo

605 CHURCH
EAST
SQUAD

II

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Weber's Greatest Thrill:
1926 OSU Grid Contest

11

III

(This is another in a series of
greatest sports thrills of Michigan
coaches.)
By FRED KATZ
Time stands still for Wally Web-
er when he speaks of the fabled'
moments of Michigan athletics,
And of them all, the one the
assistant footballacoach likes to
talk about most goes back to his
Michigan playing days.-
Place: Ohio Stadium at Colum-;
bus. Time: Early afternoon of
Nov. 14, 1926. Situation: Another
renewal of the classic Ohio State-
Michigan football rivalry.
The Wolverines, although un-
defeated and boasting their soon-
to-become legendary passing
combination (Friedman to Ooster-
baan), were installed as slight un-
derdogs.,
Bucks Take 10-0 Lead
And as the first quarter was in-
scribed into the history books, the
pre-game forecast appeared ac-
curate. The Buckeyes belted out a
quick 10-0 lead in just 12 minutes.
"Well," said Wally with an in-
tense expression on his face that
was appropriate for the point he
had just reached in his recollec-
tion, "Well, I just turned to Ooster-
baan during a timeout and said,
'Ben, I think this thing is begin-
ning to get a little serious."
"And Ben snapped back to me,
'Listen, Wally, we haven't even
had the ball yet.''
Michigan eventually did get the
ball; several times, in fact. Once
was all Oosterbaan needed as he
hauled in a Friedman pass in the

end zone after the latter had faked
a field goal.
With 30 seconds remaining in
the first half Friedman again
went into field goal formation, but
this time connecting for the three-
pointer from the 43-yd. line. It was
a brand new 10-10 ball game at
the intermission.
Conversion Missed '
The great comeback was com-
pleted in the fourth quarter when
Friedman threw another TD pass
and converted, but Michigan fans
didn't think so until the very last
minute.
An OSU six - pointer put the
Buckeyes within one, but the all-
important extra point was missed
in the waning seconds.
Weber didn't score but had his
work cut out for him just the same
by playing fullback the entire 601
minutes.'
"Even lost eight pounds," Wally
recalls. "That sure was some
game."

Beaver's Bicycle Shop
605 Church

iI

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
MIlwaukee 6 2 .750 -
Los Angeles 7 4 .636 I/
San Francisco 7 5 .583 1
Chicago 6 5 .545 1t%
Cincinnati 5 5 .545 1i%
Philadelphia 4 4 .500 2
St. Louis 3 9 .250 4
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 4,. Milwaukee 3
Chicago 6, St. Louis 1
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 2
(Only games scheduled)
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (N)
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (N)
Los Angeles at St. Louis (N)
San Francisco at Chicago

r

U

MEERSCHAUM PIPE SALE
20% OFF
Limited Supply
Beginning Fri., April 24 at
PIPE CENTER

1209-A S. University

NO 3-6236

I

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a

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,

FOR

YOUR

"SPRING

WEEKEND" DINING

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1
'

the Pant teAtaurant
State Street on the Campus
SERVING BETTER DINNERS FOR LESS
Dinner Hours: 5-7 P.m.
Open Monday through Saturday 7 A.M.-7 P.M.

* ITALIAN SPAGHETTI
< ! * CHICKEN-IN-THE-BASKET
* THREE DECKER SANDWICHES
* HOME-MADE PIES
ANGELO'S RESTAURANT
1100 E. Catherine . . . OPEN 7 A.M.-8 P.M. .. . 7 daysa week

, Jai
,.
1

AIR-CONDITIONED
The BROWNM JUG Reitourait"
SPAGH ETTI and RAVIOLI
OUR SPECIALTY
1204 South Uriversity
Hours--10:30-~7:30 Closed Saturdays

HENRY'S
C KCHUCK WAGON
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads & Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
Serving your faxorite BEER, WINES and CHAMPAGNE -
Pizza PieServed After 8 P.M. - Open From 11 A.M. to 11 P.M.
BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE
2045 PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall Henry Turner, Prop.

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* family celebration!
* extra guests
" special girl!
Entertain them in the modern, spacious
Dining Room of
THE MICHIGAN UNION
featuring steaks, lobster, rib roast,
special dinners and inexpensive luncheons
SERVING HOURS: Monday thru Saturday
7:30 to 9:00; 11:45 to 1:30; 5:45 to 7:45. Sunday
8:00 to 10:00; 12:30 to 2:30; no evening service.

Beautiful
Kitchen Facilities

I

Planning a party? We accommodatt
groups of ten to thirty - with food and appointments
to the most exacting taste. There's a wide choice of
menus, efficient service, and personal assistance on all
details. May we give you complete

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mmwmmlm

GONDOLA
YPSILANTI'S FINEST RESTAURANT
and COCKTAIL LOUNGE

-- - -
f
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Serving Sunday 12:30-9:00 P.M.
SMORGASBORD

o 0
The Best in Oriental Cuisine
Our chefs are ready to prepare
othe most delicious food for your 8
enjoyment.
TO ALL STUDENTS
i AND FACULTY"
o You will be served the fnest in
a . is

fill

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Information?
Vite Corner Jouie
S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
A block west of Rackham Bldg.--NO 8-6056

Every Saturday Night
.... ... . .........

--4

The GOLDEN APPLES
Restaurant ...

We're very proud of our modern kitchen at
Weber's. Here in a room of spotless tile and gleaming
atinless stel our chef smake their meal brebarations

features for your enjoyment
41T4 QrmI ,kA1r C

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v awdun

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