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April 22, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDN

ckham Offers Counseling

To Present 'Electra'

SWAMPS, JUNGLES:
Three Students To Cycle
Througoh Latin America

seling division, section of the Bu-
reau of ,Psychological Services of
the Institute for Human Adjust-
ment is located.
While the counseling division
offers help with a wide range of
psychologicaE.and emotional prob-
lems, the majority of their clien-
tele asks to be assisted in two
areas: solving academic problems
and aid in choosing a vocation.
Help Given
For students who "clutch on
blue-books," cannot seem to mas-
ter course material or are unable
to sustain concentrated study ef-
fort the counseling staff pro-
vides methods of solving individ-
ual problems.- However, help gen-
erally begins when "technical me-
chanical aid" has been exhausted.
Many students who suffer from
reading difficulties and similar
study problems which, in turn,
effect exam taking prowess, find
that the reading improvement
service is extremely beneficial. But
to those who know the efficient
DIAL NO 8-6416
Ending Thursday
CECIL RDEMILLES ,

methods but still can't apply
them, the counselors provide a
further source of help.
Essentially, the staff, in private
interviews, attempts to make a
student spell out his problem. Re-
alizing his difficulty, an individ-
ual can be helped to stop actions
which *have hampered his aca-
demic functioning.
Uses Interview
To solve the question of "what;
to do" the division uses the same
interview, exchange idea tech-
nique. Talking briefly during a
first interview, the staff counselor
determines just what type of
problems are confronting a stu-
dent. Solution may be found in
talking out a difficulty, testing an
individual or referring him to vo-
cational information which the
division keeps on file.
Running an individual through
a battery of tests designed for all
students isn't the standard means
of helping a person who comes for
help. The division relies on staff
flexibility to adjust to particular
cases.
Dating complications, home-
sickness and roommate conflicts
are also brought into the counsel-
ing office but on a lesser scale.
The majority of problems occur in
two areas and are brought out by
students coming in for help.
Send Students
Reference by faculty, academic
counselors, residence hall advisors
bring in other students. In some
cases, the staff will refer "admin-
istrative-legal =problems" to the
offices of the Dean of Men or Wo-
men.,
When a counselor feels that
help which only these offices can
contribute is needed, he will refer
the case to the Dean of Men or
Women. Serious cases which in-
volve medical complications will
go to Health Service since the
staff is neither legally nor medi-
cally qualified in -these areas.-

-Daily-Robert Kaplan
"ELECTRA" SET-Sophocles' "Electra" will be presented at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow, Friday and
Saturday at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. The speech department's Playbill production is directed
by Prof. William Halstead and will star Lorraine Small (far right) in the title role. Others in the
cast include (left to right) Howard Green as Aegisthus, Nancy Enggass as Clyemnestra and Howard
Poyourow as Orestes. A few tickets are available for tomorrow's performance only and may be
purchased after noon at the theatre box office.
CITY COUNCIL:
Approves State Street Traffic Islands'

By NORMA SUE WOLFE
Wil Porter, Grad.; Bob Mancell,
'59, and Dick McElroy, '60, are
three University students who
met a month ago through an ad-
vertisement in the personal col-
umn and will travel an estimated
15,000 miles together via motor-
cycle through the villages and un-
penetrated jungles of Latin Amer-
ica this summer.-
The ad simply read: "Adven-
ture -- Tired of the everyday
grind? Two grad students plan-
ning expedition through S. Amer-
ica, room for two more. Live out-
doros, travel by motorcycle. June
through Sept. Net cost about
$300."
"I conceived the idea last De-
cember," Porter admitted, "but
original plans did not materialize.
I ran the ad in The Daily and for-
tunately found two other students
with similar interests and objec-
tives," he added.
Adventurers Specialize
Each of the adventurers has
something to offer, he said. Man-
cell, who is majoring in geography
and has a special interest in Latin
America, will unroll maps and
knowledge as they travel.
McElroy, a journalism student,
is going to write a book of their
adventures. And Porter is a me-
chanical engineer.
Attached to the back of each
motorcycle will be carriers for the
equipment they plan to take: pis-
tols, tape recorders, panchos,
jungle hammocks, cameras and
machetes to clear their way
through the jungle.
Area Unexplored
Two hundred of the 15,000 miles
are unexplored, according to geog-
raphist Mancell. The boys antici-
pate stringing their cycles along
cliffs with block and tackle, ford-
ing rivers and clearing their own
paths.
"All the way down there are,
good roads until we hit a 25-mile
gap in Guatemala," Porter said.
"We'll probably be able to make
it through."

"We're not supposed to make it
through there. A road won't be
built until 1961. But our motor-
cycles have oversized tires for rid-
ing through mud and along rail-
road beds."
The Darien Gap, 200 miles of
trackless jungle, is the third ,ob-
stacle. Porter described it as "the
least known area in the entire
Western Hemisphere."
The Automobile Association of
America has predicted that there
is "absolutely no possibility of
getting through."
Establish First
"If we can't penetrate Darien,
we may hitch a ride on a banana
boat," Porter said. "But this would
be defeating the entire plan of es-
tablishing a first by land," he
added.
He plans to supplement K-
ration meals in Darien with wild
bananas and other food from the
area.
"We'll have mess kits - just got
to know what we're, doing with
jungle food," Porter, who has been
planning the trip for four months,
said.
Around World
Porter hopes to work his way
around the wo'rld in a matter of
years. Past experiences. include
traveling by car "all over the
West."
Mancell spent two summers in
Mexico and the West. McElroy
described his experience in trayel
as "from Lynwood to Bay City and
back."
And how about reaction of par-
ents?
Calls Home
McElroy said,+ he called home,
briefly discussed his contemplated
tour through Latin America with
his mother, and hung up.
One-half hour later, she called
back. McElroy began his story
again.
"Actually, this is more than a
trip for adventure or fun," he em-
phasized. "Although we have no
purpose, you could say that we're
going to 'broaden our horizons'."

11

t

CHARiJ YOE ANNt WARDGQ
ETON-"BRYNNER-"BAXTER-ROBIN5ON
YVONC OtBRA JOHN
DE CARLO-PAGET-DEREK
SCieC NINA IfA A w JUTH vnCNT
tIARDWCKE- fOCH-'SCOTT-ANDERSON- PRICE
A PARAMOVNT PICTURE " TECHNICQ",QV)
ONE SHOW DAILY AT 7:30
Adults $1.00
al m DE u D 111= MI 1 "'II -

The Ann Arbor City Council
Monday night accepted a bid for
building four permanent traffic
islands in the State St. business
area.
They will be, located at State
and William, State and Liberty,
Liberty and Maynard and May-
nard and William Sts. They will
Pianist Garner

ORIENTATION, LEADER
INTERVIEWS
April 27-May 1 .L. . from 3-5
Male Students Sign Up at
Union Student Offices This Week

To Play Here
Jazz pianist Erroll Garner will
be featured in Greek Week-1959,
co-chairman Mike Sklar, '60, an-
nounced yesterday.
Garner will appear May 15 at
Hill Aud., topping a round of acti-
vities which will open with the
Inter-Fraternity Council Sing
May 11.
Garner is presently playing to
"packed houses" in New York, and
will return there after his Ann Ar-
" bor performance, Sklar said.
Order forms for block tickets
will be sent out early next week.
{ General ticket sales will open
May 6.
- --- --

replace temporary islands now
there.
Made of concrete, they will be
built so that barberry bushes can
be planted inside them by' the
Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment. Electrical and other facili-
ties for Christmas displays, in
particular Christmas trees, may
also be included.
The bid accepted last night,
which did not include the latter
item, was for $2,391.
The low bid was $245 above a,
previous engineer's estimate, -but
City Administrator Guy C. Lar-
com said that the bid was low
enough to warrant that it be
accepted.
They also approved a study of
how large amounts of rain water
get into the sanitary sewer system.
The water adds considerably to
the volume the sewage-treatment
plant must treat. During rainy
periods the average the plant
treats approaches 17,000,000 gal-
lons a day, approximately its ca-'
pacity. The normal daily flow av-
erages 8,000,000 gallons.'
The Council approved contract-
ing with a local firm of consulting1

engineers for the study. Larcom
said a rough estimate of the cost
was $10,000 for as much as two
years' work.
Board Passes
Early School
Tax Allotment
The Tax Allocation Board Mon-
day tentatively allocated the Ann
Arbor school district nine and
one-half mills of the 15-mill
property tax.
It gave Washtenaw County the
other five and one-half mills.
The action was taken unusually
early. Board chairman Wiiliiam
F. Verner said it would give the
board more time to hear from the
various governmental agencies
under it and to decide on final al-
locations.
The Ann Arbor Board of Edu-
cation had submitted a budget
that required 15 mills from the
property tax, but it has authority
to levy 51/2 more mills. The coup-
ty asked for six mills.
The county budget for the year
totals $3,175,224 with $2,889,919 of
it to be collected from the prop-
erty tax.
Final allocations must be made
by June 1. A hearing on them will
be held May 26.
The meeting will be held to dis-
cuss the preliminary allocations.

t;

If

. . La ┬žon4 c
TOBACCONISTS SINCE 1898
Ann Arbor Representative
SY MANELLO

Whew!'

}

Our shipment of Heath Stoneware
finally arrived. So many of you
have inquired about it, and
we are tlad our stock
is good again.
JOHN LEIDY
me NO 8-6779 * 601 East Liberty

1317 WILMONT

fr.5
r

FREE PIPE TOOL given with
It
the purchase of any LaFond's Briar Pipes
especially made for us by G.B.D.
FREE SAMPLES
of our six private blends on request.
Phone NO 2-4786 for Classified Ads

NO 5-7653

BOURBON ST.
MISSION
uervices
Saturday Night
I-M Building

t

-Daily--Robert Dennis
LATIN AMERICA OR BUST-Wil Porter (far left) and. Dick
McElroy (right) discuss geographical difficulties with Bob Mancell.
The three University students hope to establish a first by land
when they motorcycle through Latin America this summer.

Phon

I

DIAL NO 2-2513
ENDING THURSDAY

More people are loyal to Camels than
any other'cigarette today. It stands to
reason: the best tobacco makes the
best smoke. The Camel blend of costly
tobaccos has never been equalled for
rich flavor and easygoing mildness. No
wonder Camel is the No. 1 cigarette
of all brands today!
Fads and fancy stuff are for the birds ...
Have a real
cigarette -
have a CAMEL

DIAL NO 2-3136
"Call it the most hilarious entertain-
ment of 'this or any year and you
come close to describing 'Some Like
It Hot' . . . Go and have yourself
a wonderful time."
-N.Y. Journal-American
ARILYNMOME
and her bosom companions
TONY CURTiS
JCk LEMoN
tn a BILLY WILDER production
LkE iT
Ho r

4

I

also TOM & JERRY

D

"WFRIDAY
"WARLOCK"

I

t

Read Daily Classi ieds

I.

HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.'

ID

v., IV%. "WAMIM,

I'

,~- 'r

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