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April 19, 1959 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-19
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7 -

y

MAGAZINE

Vol. V, No. 7

Sunday, April 19,

1959'

SPRING WEEKEND AGAIN
CRITICAL LOOK AT LIFE
By Donald Yates
MOST CONSERVATIVE OF
By David Tarr

Page Two

CONSERVAtIVES

. Page Two
Page Three'

Oplllloll
(Continued from Page 81)
that space, a more -rapid use- of
those resources is bound to effect
that standard. Statistics showI
how disproportionately well off we.
are when compared to the rest of
the world. The average'daily diet
in India (1,590 calories) is less
than half that in the United
States.
The United States per capita
consumption of energy is double
that of Britain and more than 20I
times - that of India. We use 80-
times more iron than India per
capita and nearly two and one-
half times more newsprint per
capita than Britain. Americans
use nearly two thirds of the world's
production of oil.
Still, the problem of overpopu-
lation in the United States is not
essentially an economic one, not a
matter of the quantity of our food,

would be an immense block of
houses stretching 50 miles from:
the center in all directions, he
may have been a bit pessimistic.
But in his description of the peo-
ple as "uniformly clad, municipally
lodged, governmentally forced in-
to schools'and training establish-
ments all of the same pattern," he
hit upon= a noral.
A mass society of countless but
numbered persons will probably
be much as Sir, Albert describes
it, much as Aldous Huxley pictured
it in his "Brave New World."
In such a society, man's soul,
that is his imaginative, his inflec-
tive and most human part, cut off
from nature and the possibility of
solitude, will become, through
lack of use, as vestigial as his little
toe. It' is doubtful whether any
degree of freedom, bound as it is
to the ideal of the importance of
the individual, could survive amid
such a faceless mass.
Can the United States do. any-
thing? Of course, as far as build-
ing goes-better use of the decay-
ing centers of towns, more and
larger parks, arts councils to en-

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OPERATION BOOTSTRAP
By Thomas Turner

Page Five

WORST ALONENESS-OF ALL
By David Lowe__ ______
ACADEMIC APPREHENSION
By Guy E. Swanson

Page Eight
Page Nine

Factories Dot the Countryside Today

Lyn q

Weekend ,'~am

A TREASURY OF ART

Page Twelve

t
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A PERSONAL TOUCH TO FOREIGN AID
By Charles Kozoll

clothing or shelter, but a matter
of the quality of our lives.
The great danger here is to our
very selves, our souls, if, you will,
and to the most precious ideals of
our society, And because this
threat is not yet dramatic, be-
cause Ann Arbor, for example, can
grow a great deal without effecting

our basic necessities, the problem
of population in America is gen-
erally thought to be a theoretical
one. But this is not true..
WHEN Sir Albert Richardson,
past president of Britain's
Royal Academy: recently predicted
that by the year 2000 London

Page Fourteen

MAGAZINE EDITOR - David Tarr
PHOTOS: Cover: University News Service; Page 2: top, bottom right-
University News Service, bottom left-Daily-John Hirtzel; Page
5: Puerto Rico Economic Development Administration; Page 6:
United Nations; Page 8: bottom right-State of New York, others
-Daily-Allan Winder; Page 9: University News Service; Page
11: University News Service; Page 12 and 13: Fred Anderegg;
Page 15: Daily-Allan Winder.
FOR THE NOVELIST:
Critical Look at Life

w0 NOVELS of recent date
make possible an observation
4 concerning the problems of the
p young writer engaged in his pro-
fession.
"The Dud Avocado" by Elaine
Dundy (Dutton, N.Y. 1958, 255
Pp., $3.50) is a first novel by and
° f about an American female who
Sspent some time in Paris "getting
educated."
A kindly and not over-protec-
M_ ntive uncle has subscribed to the
a " expenses of Sally Jane's educa-
tion abroad, and throughout her
adventures it is only to him that
Sally Jay feels the least bit ac-
countable for her behavior.
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HIRT ROBES-
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streetwear, <
lounging, .
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all-day wear
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The inhibiting influence of this
facto- is indeed slight - which,
the reader will conclude, is all for
the best. For Sally Jay is, quite
delightfully, a law unto herself.
THE STORY opens at a good
moment: the period of adjust-
ment and acquaintance is past;
she has been around for a while
and has accepted Paris student
life for what it is.'
With this background, she meets
once again a young American art-
ist whom she had known briefly
during her first days in Paris. To
the accompaniment of extravagant
physical responses, she falls in
love. This is the initiation of Sally
Jay's "vie amoureuse."
She is an irrepressible, liberal-
minded, uncommonly consistent,
and completely believable young
American girl. Her Paris esca-
pades, which lead up to her mar-
riage and settling down back in
the United States, could have
seemed immoral committed in the
person of anyone but Sally Jay..
In short, the novel is written in
terms of truth and understanding
that can only come from enlight-
ened observation of life itself.
ANOTHER matter is "A Legacy
of Love" by Edwin Daly (Scrib-
ners, N.Y., 1958, 310 pp., $3.95).
The promise of his first novel,
published in 1957 when he was 22,
has not been realized in the
second. The story deals with Susie
Churchill and Buddy Masters, two
college students who have been
dating, and Phil Doyle, another
college boy with whom Susie falls
in love.
A secondary romantic situation
is developed between Susie's fa-
ther, a high-school teacher, and
Buddy's mother, wife of the rich-
est man in the small Michigan
lakeside town..
The relationships of the younger
threesome are never well-estab-
lished. Susie and Buddy seem
vaguely believable, but Phil Doyle,
who dies, fails tot gain the stature
of characterization required by the
principal role he occupies. The af.
fair involving the grown-ups, al-
though treated frankly and in
adult terms, is seen as a fuzzy
movement of shadows backstage
to the young people's drama.
-The conviction of reality, which
a youthful writer of realism needs
so desperately in his early work,
is seriously lacking. The sense of
authentic experience was found in
the author's first work, on which
he labored for over five years.
Daly appears not to have lived
enough to have done, within a
relatively short time, a second
novel.
Through the varying degrees of
success of the two books reviewed
here, one may. perceive the vital
need, on the part of the novelist,
of critically observed life experi-
ence as a basis for his fiction.
-Donald A. Yates
ICHI(GAN DAILY MAGAZINE

Puerto Rico
(Continued from Page 5)
most industries, Moscoso explain-
ed.
The Development Company
sometimes makes loans, he said,
but most often this function is
carried out by the Deveopment
Bank.
By no means all of Fomento's
activity is confined to plant de-
velopment, Moscoso is quick to
point out. Extensive studies of
inter-related industries, such as
the various aspects of food pro-
duction or of chemical prpduction,
are carried out; new industries are
created (use of sugar-cane waste
as paper pulp is an example), and
local industry is stimulated. Ramey
Air Force Base and Roosevelt
Roads Naval Base cooperated, to
illustrate the latter point, in a
program to give them specially de-
signed new furniture, made in
Puerto Rico to their specifications.
PROBABLY the most spectacular
area of Fomento development,
at least to the visitor, is the tourist
business. Indeed, "ten years ago,"
as Fomento literature points out,
"Puerto Ricans never thought of
their land as a tourist center, and
certainly almost no one else did
either."
Fomento had no place to accom-
modate businessmen it brought to
the island after the war, and when
no one was willing to risk a hotel
project Fomento had the Develop-
ment Company build one.
The result was the plush Caribe
Hilton, 95 per cent Fomento-own-
ed, and one of the nation's finest
hotels. Instead of meeting the de-
mand, however, the Caribe stimu-
lated it; the San Juan Intercon-
tinental and La Concha hotels
have followed (among others),
the latter opening only this past
winter. In these Fomento owns a
lesser share, Moscoso notes, having
fulfilled its role by stimulating
growth.
STILL FURTHER afield from in-
dustrial growth is a project
administered under a wing of the
Development Company: Festival
Casals, Incorporated.
This Spring's Casals Festival
will; feature, in three weeks of
music from Vivaldi to Mendels-
sohn, musicians suc r- as Isaac
Stern, Eileen Farrell, Eugene Is-
tomin, Jesus Maria Sanroma, and
the Budapest String Quartet. And
of course Pablo Casals, the world's
greatest cellist, will play and con-
duct.
Concern with the island's cul-
ture marks more than further
stress on the already booming
tourist trade, according to Gov-
ernor Munoz.
In his opinion, a new concept of
the role of government in Puerto
Rico is emerging, and with it a
further justification of the Com-
monwealth status.
"We want every Puerto Rican
to -know that rising prosperity is-
not an end in itself. It is the
servant of a spiritual purpose. You
can see the signs already. After
little more than 10 years as a
Commonwealth, a new creative up-
surge is being felt in Puerto Rico.
Our people are no longer despond-
ent, They are proud."

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