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April 18, 1959 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-04-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

pring'-Classes Move Outdoors

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone NO 2-471
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday through Friday,and Saturday 9:30 'till 11:30 A.M.

OUTDOOR CLASSES - With the advent of Spring, and the first warm days, the University has
moved outdoors, girls to Palmer field, the social whirl to the Diag, and several classes to the trees,
after vain attempts by the professors ot keep student attention in the classroom.
University Station ToPresent
ro rams on American News

The University radio station,
WUOM, is producing a series con-
cerning the gathering and) dis-
semination of news for American
consumption.
Information on many facets of
news will be presented, beginning
in June, Ed Burrows, Assistant
Director of Broadcasting in charge.
of Radio, said.
He added he thought WUOM
would present the series entitled,
"News in 20th Century America,"
again next fall.
Burrows and Glen Phillips of
WUOM toured the North, Mid-
west and. South, spending a week
each in Washington and New
York, taking tape recorded inter-
views of members in all fields of
news, from daily and weekly
newspapers, magazines, r a d io,
television, press associations, and
foreign correspondents.
Professors Kenneth Stewert and
Leland Stowe of the journalism
department, are serving as con-
sultants for the series.
WUOM will produce a mini-
mum of 13 programs, but the
number should be around 20, Bur-
rows said. To aid in the produc-
tion of this series WUOM received
a grant in aid from the Educa-
tional Radio and Television Cen-
ter to do at least 13 programs.
The series will be distributed
to the member stations of the
National Association of Educa-
tional Broadcasters on a non-
commercial basis. It will also be
distributed to interested commer-
cial stations as a public service.
Ten Done ...

At
been

present 10 programs have
completed and others will be

7- 7
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)

shortly, Burrows said. Six of those
are The Foreign Correspondent,
The -News Magazine, Women in
Journalism, Reporting in the
United Nations, The Washington
Reporter, and Behind the Iron
Curtain,
Other programs will be con-
cerned with the wire services, the
columnist, the President and the
press, the responsibilities of ra-
dio, television and newspapers,
the interview as a news technique,
and pressures by advertisers.
Almost 70 interviews totalling
approximately 40 hours were tape
recorded. Newsmen such as David
Brinkley, Martin Agronsk and
John Daly were seen.
Interviewees discussed the prob-
lems of their; media and often
suggested remedies or criteria to
better conditions.
In The Foreign Correspondent,
most of the interviewees consid-
ered that there was poor inter-
national news coverage. One of
the main complaints being lack of
depth..
Marquis Childs, columnist and
Washington reporter, says that
correspondents have found that
there is no receptivity for much
of the news that they send back.
He reports that sometimes what
they send isn't even put into the
newspapers.
He said, "The American people
are too distracted, too busy, too
indifferent. They don't want it.
Or at least they never have given
any reason they should want it.
Prof. Stowe reports the "aver-
age newspaper among 105 import-
ant American dailies, publishes
barely four columns of foreign
news per issue."
Censorship...
Censorship was also considered
a big problem. Prof. Stowe called
censorship "a constant headache."
He reports, however, that "Ameri-
can ingenuity" has repeatedly
frustrated "censorships all over
the world" with the exception of
Soviet Russia.
"Ruses and codes of all sorts
are employed with remarkable
success," Prof. Stowe reported.
For the foreign correspondent,
news magazine writing is consid-
ered the least satisfactory for
some. One who believes this way
is Howard K. Smith, presently
with CBS news in Washington.
"So little of what You write is
published," he said. You get very
little pride of authorship in any-
thing you do."
"Frequently they don't use any-
thing you say and often they
change your story around com-
pletely to give the opposite im-
pression to the one you've given,
he :reported.
In another program on the
series, The News Magazine, a
question was raised concerning
straight reporting. Roy E. Larsen,
president of "Time" was asked if
"Time's" stories were straight re-
porting or reflecting an editorial
opinion.
No Objectivity .. .
Larson said he believed there
is "no such thing as complete ob-
jectivity in reporting." He men-
tioned the fact that "Time" has
never had an editorial page and
mentioned that the magazine was
and is printed with definite preju-
dices.
Some of the prejudices of
"Time" Larson mentioned are a
distrust of increasing interference

He says "Reporter" tries "to
give reporting more perspective
and more depth." "Reporter" Ca-
ter said, regards itself "as a
magazine with a fairly consistent
editorial outlook." "We're not pro-
posing that "Reporter" magazine
be an internal debating society.
There are other magazines which
carrykother , points of view," he
remarked.
Prof. Stewert in summarizing
the magazines says that "'Time,'
in a sharp and distinctive and
provocative manner, gives con-
tinuity to events. It showed that
news does not spurt; it flows."
Prof. Stewert mentioned that
" 'U. S. News and World Report'
gave added dimensions to reports
in depth on public issues." And
he reports that older journals of
opinion and some other like 'Re-
porter' offered voice to partisans
and wider range of debate.
He thinks that magazines like
newspapers face further adapta-
tion to "supplement one another
most effectively" and to satisfy
"the hunger in the land."
Washington , ,
Switching to The Washington
Reporter, Cater of 'Reporter' re-
ports the "press in Washington
plays a unique role in the con-
duct of government in the United
States, as compared to any other
governmental system in the
world."
He explains: "Publicity, the
publicizing of policy and acts, as
anyone who has lived or had any
experience in Washington knows,
is enormously important to the
evolution of policy into acts of
government."
As an example he gives the
Presidential news conference, the
reporter at the conference "de-
termines by his questions which
subjects, which areas of tension,
of conflict, of interest shall be
brought to the immediate atten-
tion of the President, and what
the priorities are."
A discussion of reporters from
other countries and their methods
in reporting factual news is giv-
en on WUOM's Reporting in the
United Nations.
Pierre J. Huss, of United Press
International, reports a reporter
"sent from Cairo, for example,
seems to concentrate and be in-
terested only, and his paper seems
to expect only, what we would call
slanted news in their favor."
He notes that their news be-
comes "political propaganda for
home consumption."
Concerning local coverage of
the UN, Pauline Fredericks, NBC
UN reporter, reports that the
only times when the United Na-
tions has been completely covered
by radio and television and the
press, have been times of conflict.
Iron Curtain .
Behind the Iron Curtain, an-
other program on the series,
shows that just trying to cover
news in these countries is diffi-
cult. Prof. Stowe mentions on the
program that once it took him
over three months just to get a
visa to get into Rumania.
He reports "after you get there,
it's almost impossible to see the
top government officials and
they're pretty skittish as a rule."
Prof. Stowe mentioned that all
quired to live in the same hotel,
because of, course all employes
there work for the police.
Robert Magidoff, former NBC
Moscow correspondent, reports

ALTERATIONS
JOHN'S TAILOR SHOP
"The Clothing Stores' Talor"
Alterations for Men and Women.
Pressing While You Wat
118)z' E. Washington NO 2-4617
(above Conlin and Wetherbee
Clothing Store)
)P
BARGAIN CORNER
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords - $7.25
socks 39c; shorts, 69c; military sup-
plies. Sam's Store. 122 E. Washington.
)WI
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
GUY CARI is now accepting applica-
tions in his newest beauty college.
Days, afternoons, and evening classes.
For student beauticiae. For more in-
formation write or call Ann Arbor
Beauty College, 4567 Wastenaw,
Ypsilanti or NO 5-7500. )CC1
BUSINESS SERVICES
MONEY burning a hole in your Robert
Halls'? Let Lumbards relieve you of
at least a substantial portion of your
long green burden. J68
WHY NOT amble over to our Kitchen
Hardware Department and furnish
your place with those kitchen utensils
which no modern kitchen can d
without. Casserole dishes, glassware
frying pans, sprinkling bottles, every
kind of dishware, and waste disposals
all at moderate prices.
RALPH'S MARKET-
(formerly Freeman's)
709 Packard NO 2-3175
W34
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop. 224 Nickels Arcade.
NO 24647.- )J4
Shop for
SEAFOOD SPECIALTIES
IMPORTED FOOD ITEMS,
AND
GOURMET SPECIALTIES
Washington Fish Market
208 E. Washington NO 2-2589
J6
TYPING WANTED. NO 8-8551. J65
SPRING GARDENERS: We can meet
all of your gardening needs. Grass
seed and fertilizers, lawn and fer-
tilizing carts, lawn rakes, pruning
shears and all other gardening tools.
MUEHLIG & LANPHEAR
311 S. Main St.
Phone NO 2-3277
J63
EXPERT TYPING. Theses, Papers. NO
8-6157. J67
Radio, Phono, T.V.
SERVICE
Fast Dependable Pick Up & Delivery
Ann Arbor Radio and TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
J61
LADIES BARBER SHOP"
1108 S. University
Only barber In town who is a
trained and licensed Ladies' Hair
Stylist."J17
ON-DAY SERVICE
and COMPLETE SERVICE at
SANFORD'S
Sh Repairing - Hat Cleaning
Tailoring - Pressinge L,
Shoe Shining
119 East Ann Street
(opposite court house)
NO 8-6966
32
Eddie's Paint Store
White paint........$1.98 per gal.
Colors ................ $2.48 per gal.
117 E. Ann NO 8-6966
)J15
PAPERS EDITED and Typed. Quick
Service. Spelling, punctuation need
correction? NO 8-6276. J30
FREE PICKUP and DELIVERY. Com-
plet service on Phonographs and
radios. Stereo conversions. Reasonable
prices. Duraco, NO 5-5111. )J32
MISCELLANEOUS
GOOD MEALS: Frat. five minutes from
Engineering Building. Reasonable.
Any Or all meals. Steward NO 3-2600.
)MI
FOX MOTEL
Room Phones
Free T V
2805 E. Michigan HU 2-2204
)M3
USED CARS
WANTED

We pay top dollars for good used cars.
GENE'S AUTO SALES
544 Detroit St. NO 3-8141
N2
1957 HILLMAN_ MINX. Attractive two
tone 4 door Sedan. In perfect condi-
tion. $1095. NO 2-7358. N51
1957 MERCURY
Turnpike Cruiser
2-door hardtop,
All Powe'-windows, seats,
steering, brakes,
16,000 mi. $2195
UNIVERSITY OLDS
907 N. Main NO 3-0507
N47

Klingler'

Used Car
BARGAI N
WEEK
1958 PONTIAC - Convertible, radio,
heater, Hydramatic, power steering
and power brakes.
1958 PONTIAC - 9-passenger station-
wagon, radio, heater, Hydramatic,
power steering and power brakes.
1957 CHEVROLET - Bel Air V-8 4-door
hardtop, radio, heater, automatic
transmission.I
TWO,1957 PONTIAC - Hardtop coupes,
radio, heater, Hydramatic, power
steering and power brakes.
1956 OLDS -- 4-door sedan, radio
heater, Hydramatic.-

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Modern, furnished three
room apartment, close to hospitals.
NO 3-7001. C122
LARGE CLEAN rooms for men, 1 blbck
from campus. Linens furnished, rooms
cleaned weekly. Reasonable rates. Re-
mainder of semester, summer and
fall. Call Floyd, NO 2-6652 or Rock,
NO 2-3179. Leave name and phone.
C119
HOME: 2 floors, 6 rooms, June on. Fur-
nished, very reasonable. Close to cam-
pus. Call NO 2-9181. C115
1ST FLOOR APT., 4 rms. partially fur-
nished, recently redecorated, bright
and cheerful; quiet west side neigh-
borhood. NO 2-4346 or NO 3-0820.
C113

MUSICAL MDSE,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Your Favorite Records
Classical, Popular
Values up to $5.98 Now $1.98.
Limited Quanity.
First Come, First Served.
GRINNEL BROS.
323 South Main NO 2-5667
X17
Come in and hear the latest
Capitol Portable Stereo
Fully Automatic.
Withonefree record --only $69.50
Rent a brand new piano with option
to buy. $10 per month plus cartage.
All payments apply on purchase.
GRINNELL BROS.
323 South Main NO 2-5667
X16
ANN ARBOR RADIO
SERVICE AND SALES
Fast - Reasonable Rates
We stock all types of diamond needles
RADIO-PHONO-TV
& TV SERVICE
1217 S. University NO 8-7943!
Across from Campus Theater
X14

USED CARS

1956 PONTIAC - 4-door sedan,
heater, Hydramatic.

radio, 1 2

RMS. FOR RENT. You take your
choice. Park free in my driveway.
Breakfast and privileges. NO 2-1279
or NO 2-7282. C114

1956 CHEVROLET - V-8 Delray 2-door
sedan, radio and heater.
High trade-ins
Easy financing
Kl1ingier-
Pontiac

25011 Ja mn Rd_

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

S

LINES
2
3
4

wt) ?4221

2ouu J ac sonKa . .Vu -jZZ
N53
FOR SALE: 1951 MG-TD. Rebuilt motor,
new top, new paint, good cond.,
reasonably priced. Steve Bow, NO
2-3169. N52
1953 FORD Conv. R & H, good cond.,
reasonable. NO 2-9381 after 6 P.M.
N48
1956 PLYMOUTH, 4-door Belvedere,
Power steering and brakes. Radio and
heater. $1095. University Olds, 907 N.
Main, NO 3-0507. N49
AUTOS FOR SALE: Alf a Romeo 1956
Aulietta, 4-door sedan. Economy with
room for the kids and luggage space.
Excellent condition. No corrosion -
19,000 miles. NO 3-7326. N50
MUST SELL immediately - Going in
service - '53 Blue Austin-Healey con-
vert., excel. cond., many extras, $1,300.
NO 3-4187-ask for Stu. N45
FOR SALE CAR '59 S.A.A.B. Gray, like
new, 10,000 miles, 1st owner. Call NO
3-7787. N44
1957 RENAULT Dauphine - good con-
dition. NO 8-7393, after six. N42
1949 'CHEVROLET convertible with
turn signals and safety belts-$98
NO 2-5024 after 5. N39
HILLMAN 1958 Four-door wagon heat-
er. Like newi HU 2-7140. N10
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSOR-ES
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sport Cars.
Lubrication $1.25
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
!S7
WHITE'S AUTO PAINT SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
!S2
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires,tbatteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
SI
FOR RENT
1813 DEXTER AVE. Twobedrooms, ap-
pliances furnished, $125 per month.
NO 2-6154. C121
HOUSE FOR RENT-Fenced backyard
and fireplace included with a fully
carpeted, gas 'heated 6 room house.
Inquire at 629 5th Street after 4:00.
C118

303 S. DIVISION. 2nd floor apartment.
Very well decorated. Bachelor apart-
ment. Would prefer Instructor dr
Professor. Available by April 15th.
Can be seen from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M.
Phone NO 3-5797, ask for Mrs. Kelly.
C111
LARGE ROOM in our house for rent.
Quiet Gentleman. Living and bedroom
furniture. Garage included. Phone
HU 3-1316. C110
MODERN APT, for summer near cam-
pus and hospitals for 3 or 4. NO
3-1318. C105
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS: House-
keeping room. 514 S. Forest. NO 2-
1443. C17
STUDY UNDISTURBED
Large quiet rooms for men. Near
campus. NO 3-4747. )C3
FOR SALE
EVERGREENS: For University folk.
Wholesale Prices. Locally Grown.
Juniper, Arborvitae, yews, pine. Call
M. Lee, Unix. Ext. 2318 except Monday.
B47
FROM BEAUTIFUL private home one
9x12 wool floral rug by Boxbury, $50,
like new. 10 cu. ft. Westinghouse ref.
cost $360. Will sell for $85. One red
leatherette platform rocker-$25. One
tapestry platform rocker-$15. One
green slip-covered chair-$15. Lovely,
honey-colored hard 'maple double
dresser and desk with glass tops-'
half of purchase price-$110. Single
box spring and mattress-$25. One
green cushioned porch glider-45.
Available May 1. NO 3-0148., B44
SIAMESE Kittens. Stud service. Cali
NO 2-9020. B23
35 FOOT 856 MARLETTE, excellent
condition, fully equipped, air con-
ditioned. Call NO 3-2294 after 5. B2
17' NATIONAL-ONE-design sailboat,
complete with trailer and sails. Make
an offer. Call GLenview 3-2156 for
details. . 40
HELP WANTED
Experienced
SECRETAR IES
Due to our continued expansion we
are seeking secretaries for several
responsible positions in our organi-
zation. Qualified persons selected
will find excellent working condi-
tions, opportunity for advancement,
salary and fringe benefits. All re-
plies will be held in confidence.
Apply in person mornings:
Mr. Lawrence Smiley
BENDIX
Systems Division
3300 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor
H
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST II-$5667-
$6387 (Effective June 29, 1959). Pres-
sent rate $5459-$6179. Citizenship,
not over 40. A.S.C.P. registered, 3
years experience. Promotional oppor-
tunities to higher grades having a
maximum $6866. Liberal fringe bene-
fits. Write: Wayne County Civil Serv-
ice Commission, 626 City County
Building, Detroit 26, Michigan, Wood
ward 5-2750. H23

COMPARE MAGNAVOX, RCA VICTOR,
WEBCOR, ADMIRAL
$109.95 and up

I DAY
.80h
.96
1.12

X12
RARL Violins & String Instrument
repairs, Pianos (Baldwin, Ivers &
Pond, Estey) and Organs (Baldwin,
Estey, Thomas) New and Used.
Terms.

PIANOS-ORGANS
Best offer Keyboard Service
WURLITZER SOHMER KIMBALL
Dealer
ANN ARBOR PIANO CO.
213 E. Washington, NO 3-3109
)X3

A WAXY CAST of a farmer's grain, a
gift of light but all in vain. In a den
of harpies shoulder high, somewhat
obscene in your discrete eye. Y.I.TB.
Panther. P184
ATTENTION: All freshmen interested
in committee chairmanship positions
for Block "M" come to S.A.B., Tues-
day, April 21, 3-5 P.M. F183
ONLY IN MICHIGAN . . . You can't
tell a Med-Student from a Good-
Humor Man. F182
SLEEP LATEand eat late. Pancake
breakfast served home style. Pan-
cakes with bacon; ham or sausage.
LUMBARD'S 1225 S. University
F36
INVESTIGATIVE WORK: All types in-
formation provided or developed on a
strictly confidential basis. NO 3-7455.
F154
LIKE TO SHOOT fish in a barrel?
Shrink heads? Poison neighbor's
barking dogs and children? Then
see Lumbard's at 1225 S. University.
F181

We have served the Faculty, Staff
and Students of the University of
Michigan in the field of Real Es-
tate and General Insurance. May
we serve you?
F. A.Sargeant Co

3 DAYS
2.00
2.40
2.80

6 DAYS
.2.96
3.55
4.14

REALTORS
401 E. Liberty St.

I NSI.

OC 2-

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11 :30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

PERSONAL
ONE WAY TICKET to Paris. Depa
N.Y. 6/23/'59 on Mich. Un~ion Airfligl
to Europe. Inquire immediately
Union Student Offices. Fl
UNCLE SWEN needs you. F1
NEW AIR-CONDITIONED 3-ROOM UT
furnished. Has stove, icebox, garba
disposal. Hardwood floors, All oth
facilities. Detroit near Gratiot ar
Outer Drive. $85 per month. NO
3392. George Zinn. Fi
ORDER YOUR block ticket snow
the Spring Week-end office, Unio
FE
Do you know all about
SPRING WEEK-END?
Picnic
Dance
Canoe Race
Balloons
Skit Night
Block Tickets
Yo-Yo's
Well, Find Out! Fi
Follow those balloons , . .
F1
BUSINESS PERSONAL
KNITTERS REJOICE!
Real imported Shetland yarn now
available for 65c an oz.; 25 colors
including heathers. NO 3-0877, ,
UNIQUE MOTHER'S DAY GIFT
Your portrait sketched at Cousin's
store. 309 S. State, Tuesdays only
FF1l
FRENCH tutoring by native Fr. teat
er. Call' NO 5-7516. FF
ALTERATIONS
One Week Service
Also 24 hour Specials
Call after 6 P.M. on Tuesdays
Mrs. Maloney Phone NO 2-8238
FF
GUITAR LESSONS:
Guitars, qualified instructor,
Call Maddy Music for details.
NO 3-3395 508 E. Willia
HAVE YOUR SWEATERS knitted, esp
cially for you, designed to fit you
actly. Choose colors, style. NO 3-92
WANTED TO RENT
FOR RENT modern furnished apa
ment on campus. Contact NO 3-65,
WANTED, a hall to rent for lector
on Psychology. Write ,Dr. Mar
Bloch, L-Hy, 240 Rivington St., N,
N.Y.
REAL ESTATE
REAL ESTATE: Lovely brick ran
6 rooms, three bedrooms. Full of livi
happiness. Fireplace, 2-car attach
garage, plus good sized lot. Drastica
reduced to sell at once. Don't pass
the opportunity. Call today for a
potntment to inspect.
GORDON L. LINDLAND REALTORI
NO 2-5683
BUILD YOUR DREAM HOUSE NEA
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Unusual opportunity to buy 54
acres situated 1%miles from it
limits. 'Beautiful building site
Garden soil. An ideal suburban es
tate for the price of a city 191
Leonard C. Horn, 5056 Park Road
Ann Arbor, NO 8-6249. W

Mass. Research Assistant. Position for
a young woman who will assist senior
members of the Research Dept. Bach's
Degree in Economics, Psych., or other
social science, or in Math. or English.
Rank in first third of class.
Delavan Mfg. Co., Des Moines, Iowa.
One research engineer, one project,
engr., and ,2 asst. project engrs.
Alco Products, Inc., Schenectady 5,
N.Y. Technical Editor, Publications
Engr., Head Reactoy Engr., Chief Pro-
ject Engr., and Head Plant Systems
Engr.,
New York state Civil Service listing
for new pay rates for state positions on
fileyat the Bureau of Appointments.
They are effective April, 1959.
Minnesota Civil Service. Institutions
Social Service Consultant, Accounting
Control Analyst, Aquatic Biologist, Re-
search Analysts, Veterinarians, and
Clinical Psychologists,
Nat'1 Rural Electric Coop. Assoc'
Management Consultant and Mgt. Spe-
cialist. For the Mgt. Spec.: B.A. degree
with major in Mgt., Bus. Ad., or Pub-
lic Ad. Experience desirable. Same de-
gree requirements for Mgt. Con.
Keiser & Co., Inc., Toledo, Ohio, Sales
Trainee. ,.5. in Chem. or Engrg. with
military service behind him.
Allied Chemical Corp., New York City
Person for Technical Sales. June grads
in Civil Engrg. with good scholastic
record, preferable with Highway op-
tion.
A. A. Institute 'of Tech., Wright-
Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Teach-
ing vacancy in Dept. of Electrical
Engrg. Ph.D. or soon to receive one,
but under certain conditions a person
with MS. would be considered.
Ford Motor Co., Detroit. Laboratory
Engrg. with Chem. Engrg. background.'
B,..in Ch.E. or equivalent in exp.
For further information concerning
any of the above positions, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4001 Admin.,
Ext. 3371.

ONLY IN MICHIGAN .
own Best Seller: "The
Treatment of Poison Ivy!"

We've our
Care and
F180

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST or Labora-
tory Assistant for hospital in im-
portant industrial town. Salary com-
mensurate with qualifications. Write
to box No. BB17, Michigan Daily, for
interview. H25
LOST AND FOUND
LOST Thursday $20 and $5 dollar bill
in the vicinity of Washington Street,
between State and Thayer. Call NO
5-7115. A39
FOUND: Brown leather glass-case on
State St., April 7. Dr. Trombelli on
case. Owner call NO 2-7320. A37
LOST: Gold, heart shaped locket, on
March 25, on or near S. U. Call Sonia
Kronizk, NO 2-3225. A33
Phone NO 2-4786
for Classified Advertising

corner state

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*J

1 ___

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